Plant ID forum: Maybe some sort of Buckeye?

Views: 503, Replies: 13 » Jump to the end
Name: Michelle
Cheyenne, WY (Zone 5a)
Salvias
Image
MrsBinWY
May 31, 2018 10:40 AM CST
Hello everyone,

This small tree (probably ~15' tall) is growing in Cheyenne, Wyoming, in the hospital's landscaping. When the flowers opened, they were creamy-yellow. The tree's form and palmate leaves remind me of what we call Ohio Buckeye, but I notice the leaflets on this this tree are much narrower. Does anyone know?

Thank you!

Thumb of 2018-05-31/MrsBinWY/56a845 Thumb of 2018-05-31/MrsBinWY/d68c2f

Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
May 31, 2018 5:38 PM CST
Could very well be Ohio Buckeye - Aesculus glabra - but could also be some other Aesculus species growing far from home. The growing conditions in Cheyenne, WY don't exactly match up well with eastern North America where Ohio Buckeye is native to, so altered leaf morphology could be expected in those generally drier conditions in the high country.

If you can take more pictures of the whole plant, then trunk, branches, etc. then perhaps we could offer a more solid opinion of this plant. Also, since it appears to have flowered well, stay with the observations and take pictures as seed begins to form where the flowers were. The characteristics of the reproductive parts are also good for determining which species you have there.
John
Name: Michelle
Cheyenne, WY (Zone 5a)
Salvias
Image
MrsBinWY
Jun 9, 2018 6:49 PM CST
Thank you John. I'm starting to wonder if I just happened to pick a branch of Aesculus glabra when the leaves were juvenile/newly emerged. The third pic kind of supports that theory *Blush* Sorry about the fire drill!

Thumb of 2018-06-10/MrsBinWY/8ebba2 Thumb of 2018-06-10/MrsBinWY/00f770 Thumb of 2018-06-10/MrsBinWY/a56e2c Thumb of 2018-06-10/MrsBinWY/0fb52b Thumb of 2018-06-10/MrsBinWY/09865a

Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Jun 10, 2018 9:28 AM CST
Those last two pictures of the trunk and basal flare offer interesting information.

It appears that this could be a grafted plant. If so, it is far more likely that you could have an Aesculus hippocastanum (European Horsechestnut) selection there.

It would have been great to see that plant in full flower. You captured images just before the flowers opened, and then these after-flowering pictures with seed forming.

Aesculus hippocastanum 'Baumannii' has double white flowers, quite distinctive from the native species of Buckeye. Also: you can separate most/all the non-North American Aesculus species by their sticky buds. Check for that next time you stroll by this specimen.

John
[Last edited by ViburnumValley - Oct 9, 2018 8:25 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1732528 (4)
Name: Michelle
Cheyenne, WY (Zone 5a)
Salvias
Image
MrsBinWY
Jun 11, 2018 9:23 PM CST
Well, this is getting interesting. Various sites show A. hippocastanum with more ovoid leaflets than those of A. glabra.

https://www.uwgb.edu/biodivers...
https://www.extension.umn.edu/...

I'll try to keep a better eye on the tree and watch for the fruits to mature later this year. Thank you for your help!
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Jun 12, 2018 4:01 PM CST
You are quite welcome.
John
Name: Michelle
Cheyenne, WY (Zone 5a)
Salvias
Image
MrsBinWY
Oct 6, 2018 8:42 PM CST
A couple more pictures of a seed I managed to pick. A helpful clue? Thank you!

Thumb of 2018-10-07/MrsBinWY/9fe9f7 Thumb of 2018-10-07/MrsBinWY/b86480 Thumb of 2018-10-07/MrsBinWY/a9cf5b
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Oct 6, 2018 11:04 PM CST
It looks like a Horse Chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum). There are a lot of them growing here in northern Nevada and southern Idaho. Very cold hearty and very pretty.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Michelle
Cheyenne, WY (Zone 5a)
Salvias
Image
MrsBinWY
Oct 7, 2018 8:16 PM CST
Thank you Daisy!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Oct 7, 2018 10:48 PM CST
Thumbs up
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Oct 9, 2018 8:34 AM CST
I agree with Daisy's summation.

Aesculus hippocastanum - European Horse-chestnut - is a non-native Buckeye equivalent. That quite spiny husk helps identify it, and separates this species from most of the North American species.

Did you remember to check the parent plant for sticky buds? That's another good way to ID, even when no leaves, flowers, fruit, or husks are evident.

Watch it next spring when it is in flower. I won't be surprised if you report that it has double flowers, since it appears to be a grafted plant.

John
Name: Michelle
Cheyenne, WY (Zone 5a)
Salvias
Image
MrsBinWY
Oct 9, 2018 10:38 AM CST
Thank you John. I'll watch for the buds and blooms next year. I haven't been able to check the parent for sticky buds, as the grounds keepers trimmed all the suckering shoots. The branches are pretty much beyond my reach, and I had to jump several times to pick the seed I did get Hilarious!

I sowed the one seed in a pot outside. Perhaps it'll germinate come spring (though I'm not expecting it to come true to 'Baumannii'). Hmmm. I just read on the Missouri Botanical Garden site that 'Baumannii' doesn't set seed. Maybe there's another double-flowered cultivar that does set seed.

Thanks ever so much everyone!
Name: Michelle
Cheyenne, WY (Zone 5a)
Salvias
Image
MrsBinWY
Jun 6, 2019 8:51 PM CST
Just to close the loop, here are pics of the seedling when it first germinated and with its first leaves. My camera has a hard time focusing on white and light yellow, but hopefully the last photo is clear enough to give an idea of how the flowers look.

Thumb of 2019-06-07/MrsBinWY/3b209d Thumb of 2019-06-07/MrsBinWY/59cbb6 Thumb of 2019-06-07/MrsBinWY/5a249f

Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Jun 8, 2019 11:30 AM CST
You still owe us a picture of the buds. Even if you can't reach them, you should be able to zoom in on one or several, and the evidence will be there. Additionally, that seedling will have buds as it goes into dormancy this fall.

Those are normal flowers for the genus Aesculus. If the parent tree is indeed Aesculus hippocastanum (or even 'Baumannii'), then the seedling will exhibit similar traits though double-flowered selections don't always produce double-flowered seedlings.
John

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Plant ID forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by bootandall and is called "cabbage leaves"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.