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Jun 1, 2018 8:38 AM CST
North-Central Texas
Not sure if it's a Pothos or philodendron. Someone gave me a cutting a few years ago and I kept it in a vase of water for all that time. Last week it got really long and only had leaves on the very end so I cut it in half and planted it. I added a miracle gro fertilizer spike. The original rooted stem is planted and I planted a cutting in the same pot, another part of the cutting is in a jar of water. What can I do to make this little guy thrive? I don't want to lose it after all these years.
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Last edited by Skye3 Jun 1, 2018 8:45 AM Icon for preview
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Jun 1, 2018 9:12 AM CST
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Not an ivy, looks like Satin Pothos (Scindapsus pictus 'Argyraeus')
Others will advise o care but it does look like it's in too large of a pot to begin with.
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Jun 1, 2018 9:16 AM CST
Name: Lin Vosbury
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Hi Skye3, Welcome!

Your plant appears to be Satin Pothos (Scindapsus pictus 'Argyraeus') and the container looks quite large for the size of cuttings and the soil looks quite dry.

I've always had difficulty and little success acclimating water rooted plants to soil conditions but I know many people do it without any problem. The stems should produce roots at each node along the bare stem as long as the nodes are in constant contact with the soil.
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Jun 1, 2018 9:22 AM CST
North-Central Texas
Last edited by Skye3 Jun 1, 2018 9:32 AM Icon for preview
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Jun 1, 2018 9:34 AM CST
North-Central Texas
Calif_Sue said:Not an ivy, looks like Satin Pothos (Scindapsus pictus 'Argyraeus')
Others will advise o care but it does look like it's in too large of a pot to begin with.


It never occurred to me that the pot could be too big. I assumed it needed room to grow since I put another cutting in with it. I am new to this. I also thought Pothos and philodendron were considered ivy since they are vining plants (like devils ivy is Pothos) anyway, I'm still learning. Although I hesitate to repot it because I don't want to shock it to death.

Thanks!
Avatar for Skye3
Jun 1, 2018 9:37 AM CST
North-Central Texas
plantladylin said:Hi Skye3, Welcome!

Your plant appears to be Satin Pothos (Scindapsus pictus 'Argyraeus') and the container looks quite large for the size of cuttings and the soil looks quite dry.

I've always had difficulty and little success acclimating water rooted plants to soil conditions but I know many people do it without any problem. The stems should produce roots at each node along the bare stem as long as the nodes are in constant contact with the soil.



Thanks! It never occurred to me that the pot could be too big since I put the original and a cutting in it. I assumed it needed room to grow. I am still learning. Also, I tend to over water and have killed many plants doing that so now It seems I overcompensate at times. I used to drown every plant I brought home (by accident of course) but now I have about 12 that are doing okay. I hope to eventually have many more!
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Jun 1, 2018 11:47 AM CST
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
The term "ivy" is used to describe a variety of different plants that are entirely unrelated. Ivy most commonly refers to Hedera Ivies whereas Potos is the common name for what you have. Both are vining plants but are otherwise unrelated.

Roots need only a little bit of room to grow. When given too much room, they are much more prone to root rot.

A single strand of your Pothis will never amount to much of a plant. Pothos look much better when there are many, many stems or vines potted all together in a single small pot.
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Avatar for Skye3
Jun 1, 2018 11:56 AM CST
North-Central Texas
I have planted all the cuttings I took off of the extremely legging one vine I started with into the same pot. It still may be too much room but i'm hoping it will fill out. I have a well draining pot with some rocks in the bottom so I hope it won't be prone to root rot but I probably under water it anyway. So hopefully it will pick up and fill out. I had no one teach me how to grow plants and have always been really bad at it until recently (every plant except this one died in the last 5 years at my house, usually within a month) so far I have many plants that are thriving. But this one sure needs help!
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