Ask a Question forum→What are these lines on my young watermelon plant?

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North Texas
Mommygardener
Jun 1, 2018 9:13 AM CST
Hi everyone! I am a new gardener and thought I would start off with watermelons and pumpkins. My pumpkins are doing great. My watermelons are growing very slowly and I noticed black and brown lines on the leaves. Can anybody identify these and suggest ways to help them?
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jun 1, 2018 1:59 PM CST
Welcome!

It looks like mechanical damage, not insect damage. It seems to be confined to the seed leaves (the round leaves that grew first) and could be as simple as the shell of the seed got stuck there.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
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North Texas
Mommygardener
Jun 9, 2018 5:55 AM CST
Thank you. I will check on that to see if it helps. I got to this message late, they have slowly been getting worse. My pumpkins are doing the same now.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Jun 9, 2018 6:00 AM CST
The wiggly lines could be leafminer. When you say it is getting worse, is it on the "true leaves" now rather than just the cotyledons? Maybe you could post a new picture, or compare with these pictures if it's happening on other leaves now:.

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North Texas
Mommygardener
Jun 10, 2018 7:06 AM CST
When I was looking into the problem before posting on here, I thought the soil was too acidic because I added some coffee grounds. Not knowing I shouldn't have added them so early. So I watered them with a little water and baking soda. The pumpkins seemed to get a little better (maybe just in my head) and the watermelons didn't. I will post pictures today. Thank you for y'alls help!
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Jun 10, 2018 7:11 AM CST
Coffee grounds aren't necessarily acidic. Often they are not and in fact can be quite the opposite. The baking soda would not be a good idea but would depend how strong you made it and what the pH of the mix is. What are they growing in, in the pictures it looks like some kind of bark mix with fairly large particles?
North Texas
Mommygardener
Jun 11, 2018 10:18 AM CST
They were in a half milk jug in some organic potting mix. I have been working on an in ground garden and just planted them in mounds. I took pictures before I put them in ground.
Out of desperation a few days ago, I removed the black and wilted leaves. They look like this now. I noticed the pumpkins look like they are trying to flower..
The 2 small ones are the watermelon. The rest are pumpkin. Is it normal for watermelon to progress slowly? I planted them at the same time (may 14)
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Jun 11, 2018 10:49 AM CST
The problem with adding things willy nilly without soil tests is that if you change the pH too much, you can make nutrients inaccessible to plants. You can also overdose them on one nutrient while undosing on others - also bad. Its always best to stick with a commercially made potting mix and a commercially made fertilizer.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
North Texas
Mommygardener
Jul 2, 2018 2:21 PM CST
Hello! I have an update and a question. So I planted my pumpkins in hills and they grew so much! Too much that they are too crowded.. Are there any tips to separating the plants safely? This is an old picture but it gives an idea.
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Name: Big Bill
Livonia, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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BigBill
Jul 2, 2018 3:35 PM CST
Those first 2 leaves are the cotyledons.. Their purpose, since they are thick and fleshy, is to protect the additional sets of leaves that will soon follow. The second set of leaves, and all those going forward will look normal like typical watermelon or pumpkin leaves. They are probably fleshy and blunt to push through the soil as they germinate.
These cotyledons are simple leaves, often with pronounced and visible veins. Those are the "lines" you are seeing. There is nothing wrong, no disease, no problems, just totally normal! Plus they do not last very long quickly turning yellow and they shrivel and fall off.
Rodney Wilcox Jones, my idol!
Businessman, Orchid grower, hybridizer, lived to 107!
[Last edited by BigBill - Jul 2, 2018 3:37 PM (+)]
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