Post a reply

Image
Apr 15, 2021 3:36 PM CST
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
If the leaves were drooping more than normal, then it was probably underwatered but did not need a larger pot. It appears that it is now in a very large pot and that is an invitation to potential overwatering and root suffocation.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Avatar for riannenrings
Apr 21, 2021 7:00 PM CST

CPPgardener said:The soil is not the problem. In fact, there is no problem. That's just the way they grow in deep shade. If they REALLY droop, like straight down, THEN you have a problem. If it gets that little sun and in that size pot, you probably are giving it too much water. It should be dry down about 3" before you water it again and make sure some water comes out the bottom.


Thank you!! This is a great reference for watering. I'll adjust.
Avatar for riannenrings
Apr 21, 2021 7:01 PM CST

WillC said:If the leaves were drooping more than normal, then it was probably underwatered but did not need a larger pot. It appears that it is now in a very large pot and that is an invitation to potential overwatering and root suffocation.


Thanks for your feedback. Do you think it is worth trying to repot it into a smaller pot, or should I leave it at this point?
Avatar for CPPgardener
Apr 21, 2021 10:30 PM CST
Name: John
Pomona/Riverside CA (Zone 9a)
Since it hasn't been that long, repotting shouldn't stress it too much. A pot close to the size it was in when you got it would be good for at least a year. Try to keep the original root-ball together when you remove it from the pot.
Now you need to find a plant in a big container like the one you're emptying! Hilarious! Rolling on the floor laughing
“That which is, is.That which happens, happens.” Douglas Adams
Image
Apr 22, 2021 7:08 AM CST
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Prof. plant consultant & educator
If the original rootball is mostly intact and the excess soil added can be removed easily without disturbing the roots, then downsizing is an option.

I am often called on to maintain overpotted plants so it can de be done. Remove some of the excess soil that was added on top of the original rootball when it was repotted. That excess soil keeps oxygen from penetrating into the root zone properly. The uppermost roots should be barely covered. After removing the excess soil, let the top half-inch of the remaining soil get dry to your finger probe before watering it just enough that it reaches that same level of dryness again in about one week to 10 days.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Avatar for riannenrings
Apr 23, 2021 9:41 AM CST

CPPgardener said:Since it hasn't been that long, repotting shouldn't stress it too much. A pot close to the size it was in when you got it would be good for at least a year. Try to keep the original root-ball together when you remove it from the pot.
Now you need to find a plant in a big container like the one you're emptying! Hilarious! Rolling on the floor laughing


Yes! What fun though Smiling thank you for the help, I am loving this plant and want it to be happy!
Avatar for riannenrings
Apr 23, 2021 9:42 AM CST

WillC said:If the original rootball is mostly intact and the excess soil added can be removed easily without disturbing the roots, then downsizing is an option.

I am often called on to maintain overpotted plants so it can de be done. Remove some of the excess soil that was added on top of the original rootball when it was repotted. That excess soil keeps oxygen from penetrating into the root zone properly. The uppermost roots should be barely covered. After removing the excess soil, let the top half-inch of the remaining soil get dry to your finger probe before watering it just enough that it reaches that same level of dryness again in about one week to 10 days.


Thank you for these great details! I'll give it a try and hopefully he will be much happier Smiling
Avatar for riannenrings
Oct 31, 2021 1:49 PM CST

I need some help. My plant has little white bugs and it's making it sick and discolored. I've tried treating with Neem oil several times but they come back. Any ideas?
Thumb of 2021-10-31/riannenrings/af6d57


Thumb of 2021-10-31/riannenrings/4365aa
Avatar for CPPgardener
Oct 31, 2021 10:44 PM CST
Name: John
Pomona/Riverside CA (Zone 9a)
You have mealybugs. They are a type of soft scale insect. They can be very difficult to get rid of. Either lots of physical removal with Neem, alcohol, or just plain cotton swabs or....... a quick spray or granule application of systemic insecticide. One gets rid of bugs and the other makes you feel like an old-time blue-ribbon gardener. Go with the systemic.
“That which is, is.That which happens, happens.” Douglas Adams
Image
Nov 13, 2021 9:01 PM CST
Name: PotterK
Seattle, WA
Fatsia leaves are normally chaotic. We have two plants, growing outdoors in deep shade. They are each over six feet tall. Some leaves grow straight up, but they are always small and come out at the very top of the plant. Most leaves grow outward, some with very long stems, making a fine profile curve with that big lobed leaf at the end. And there are leaves that grow straight downward, sometimes to the point where they hug the main stem. Those leaves are smaller but still alive.

I find that fatsia's chaotic appearance can be tempered by judicially pruning out the leaves that overcrowd or cross or just don't look right. The plant doesn't mind heavy leaf pruning. Put some negative space among those leaves and Fatsia's chaos can be made very elegant.

Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.
  • Started by: greencode
  • Replies: 29, views: 33,549
Member Login:

( No account? Join now! )

Today's site banner is by dave and is called "Sunroots"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.