Ask a Question forum→Question about English Walnut Trees

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Louisiana
Boomanchu
Jun 3, 2018 6:33 AM CST
Hello, I'm in need of some advise- Last year I planted 3 English Walnut seedlings. They were about a foot tall when I planted them and all 3 grew to about 4 feet tall and looked great. I live in Louisiana and we had a really bad cold snap during the winter. Not normal at all for around here. Well, by the end of the winter all 3 trees looked like 3 poles sticking out of the ground. I lost all limbs. I thought they were dead; however around April they started to sprout new growth at the bottom only. Well now 2 months later all 3 trees are taller then last year, however just the sprouts from the bottom growing. It doesn't appear that the main trunk of the tree is growing. My question is, will the trunk grow to make a tree or will it just bush out from the bottom and not become a tree?
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Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Jun 3, 2018 7:42 AM CST
They can be trained into trees.
First thing is, I believe they are graphed to a wild rootstock, so you want no branch that is growing from below graph.
If all branches are growing below graph, cut them all off, it may force top to grow.
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 3, 2018 9:48 AM CST
Did you grow these trees from nuts? Or purchase them from a grower? If they are grafted (and if they are from a grower, they should be) you can see the graft a couple inches above the soil line - there will be a little bend in the tree trunk and a visible joint.

Do the scratch test on the original trunks (scratch the bark with your finger nail. If the tissue under is green, the tree is alive). If the tops are dead, pruning off the sprouts from the roots won't change the fact that the tree is dead. The roots will grow a black walnut type tree. If you want to keep the rootstock tree, choose one new 'trunk' and pull (not cut) the extra stems off.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Jun 3, 2018 10:57 AM CST
The leaves on those branches do not look like black walnut to me, they look closer to English walnut.
Louisiana
Boomanchu
Jun 3, 2018 1:01 PM CST
I don't think they were grafted. I purchased these from a grower, however the purchase order just says walnut seedlings. I looked on their website and they offer grafted and not. I did notice a bend at the bottom on one of the plants, but the sprouts start at ground level and come up about 12" up the main trunk. I did the scratch test and the main truck is dead all the way down to the first sprout. (About 12" from ground level. )
Louisiana
Boomanchu
Jun 3, 2018 1:55 PM CST
Here is a close up of the leaves- everything I can tell, they look like English walnut. I did find out it is grafted. I noticed the "bend" about 12" up the truck.
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 3, 2018 2:22 PM CST
English Walnuts are grafted because they aren't resistant to soil pathogens and diseases. The rootstock chosen is one that is the most resistant to pathogens in an area.

In California, that is the native blackwalnut (Juglans hindsii) or a hybrid of J. hindsii and an English Walnut. I don't know what the grower of your particular English Walnut is using for rootstock but it may very well look a lot like an English Walnut.

If you truly found a graft on the trunk of your tree, anything below that graft is from the root. I think its time to ask the grower what the name of the rootstock is. If you know the name of his nursery or the variety of walnut you bought, you might find that information on line. When you find that information, you can decide if you are going to keep the rootstock trees or replace them.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org

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