Roses forum→New Evelyn own root problem

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(Zone 6b)
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WitchyWV
Jun 18, 2018 11:49 AM CST
I got an Evelyn from Roses Unlimited a couple weeks ago. It had 2 nice tall canes. One of them looked kind of funky and sad. It was getting worse, and when I went to put it in the ground yesterday, I saw the black bottom. It became clear why the cane looked so bad compared to the other. Instead of watching it deteriorate, I chopped it off as close as I could while I still had it in the pot. I now have a one cane Evelyn. Did I do the right thing? Did giving it the big chop help encourage it to maybe throw up a new cane, or should I have left those leaves to feed the plant? I was afraid it would kill the whole plant based on how sorry that cane looked. I had been wanting Evelyn for a long time, and now I'm worried about my poor one cane.
Name: Patty W
La Salle Illinois (Zone 5a)
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Pattyw5
Jun 18, 2018 12:59 PM CST
Witchy, for what it's worth I think you did. The black part was not good cane. So leaving it on could have caused it to spread to your good cane and that part was not good anyway.
By the time roses go on sale they aren't the cream of the crop obviously. But rose are tough cookies isn't it surprising how they can survive sometimes?
Name: Krista
Upstate NY (Zone 5a)
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Krista_5NY
Jun 18, 2018 1:09 PM CST
I've found Evelyn to be a sturdy rose, and I think it should be OK to start growing with just one cane.
It's an awesome rose, an amazing bloomer with good repeat.
(Zone 6b)
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WitchyWV
Jun 18, 2018 1:10 PM CST
I got it before the sale. I figured it wouldn't be around for the sale. Hilarious! It looks ok so far. I have some still in pots, and I'm afraid they are going to cook. It's probably too hot to be planting them, so I'll wait until the beginning of Sept. I guess I should put them in bigger pots. The potting soil in those dries out super quick. I'm finding new canes wilting over. I have pots in a spot where they get afternoon shade, but it's just too hot. Went out barefooted and burned my feet on the concrete. I had to come back and find flip flops before watering them. D'Oh!
(Zone 6b)
Cat Lover Moon Gardener
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WitchyWV
Jun 18, 2018 8:07 PM CST
I got Wollerton Old Hall in a 2gal pot that came from ARE. That one was the one getting droopy the fastest, so I did it first. I'll do some more tomorrow, but not in the middle of these heat wave days. It cooled off with enough daylight for me to do one. I think I've got 4 left in the RU 1gal pots.
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Jun 18, 2018 8:33 PM CST
Witchy ...

The root mass is probably not large enough to support the top growth and that's why you are seeing wilting canes.

Even once you get it into the ground and the rose spreads it's roots, you may still see wilting canes. In a way, they are just young plants. You can have plenty of moisture in the root zone, but they haven't developed enough to work efficiently.

When I transplanted a rose in triple digit temps, I cut back the top growth so that it was no larger than the root mass. Then I shaded it by putting a table over the rose and a sheet on the table. I had one part of the sheet sticking in a bucket of water next to the rose to wick. This kept the sheet moist and helped create a moister and somewhat cooler environment for the newly planted rose. Another NGA member suggested a tweak that I will use next time and that is to put a small container of water under the table with the rose to enhance humidity.

The reason for more humidity is that roses do take moisture in through their foliage.

As the rose gets settled in and grows more roots, you can remove the shade you are providing during the cooler parts of the day.
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
(Zone 6b)
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WitchyWV
Jun 18, 2018 8:58 PM CST
That is a good idea. I was thinking about putting a lawn chair or something over them. When I took it out of the pot, it had visible roots all over the bottom. I could string the sheet between two chairs. It perked up pretty fast after I watered it. I'll try the sheet thing, and the one in the ground will get a chair for a while.
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Jun 18, 2018 9:14 PM CST
I usually hose down the sheet before I stick a piece of it into the bucket of water.

My summer temps create a very hot, dry climate. I have found that in my garden, it takes a rose about four years to come into its own.

Starting the rose this way, once the spring humidity drops, seems to mitigate the heat stress for a young plant.
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.

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