Roses forum→Which order to plant these roses in?

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Name: Lola
Tasmania
Keeps Sheep Roses Cottage Gardener Garden Photography Birds Farmer
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LolaTasmania
Jul 5, 2018 4:08 AM CST
I am about to plant the last of the roses for my new border. I have Sharifa Asma and Ambridge at either end and have three roses to plant in between them. I have Jubilee Celebration, Boscobel and Windermere and am going to put Windermere between JC and Boscobel. Should I put them :SA-JC-W-Bosc-Amb, or SA-Bosc-W-JC-Amb? I am unsure of the warmth of the pinks and don't want them to clash with their neighbours. Lola.
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin (Zone 8a)
Roses Dahlias Irises Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
hampartsum
Jul 5, 2018 8:35 AM CST
Hi Lola, from your series it is clear to me that you are trying to alternate strong pinks with soft ones. In my view Boscobel seems identical to JC.
and . I only have JC in my garden. It is very floriferous and keeps putting flowers all season. Colorwise it is a strong orange pink. It will contrast with the soft pink of SA. I can't speak about Boscobel, so if it behaves similarly then both options would be indistinguishable in the long run. Jc is a rather short shrub here. Not more than 80 cm high ( second year after planting). Windermere in the centre is neutral. I'm assuming that it will act pivotally. Is that what you are looking for?. Of course all other considerations ( final size, greenery, textures, still apply).Hope it helps.
Arturo
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin (Zone 8a)
Roses Dahlias Irises Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
hampartsum
Jul 5, 2018 10:15 AM CST
Lola, as an addendum. I gave myself some thought about what is underlying under your idea of colour clash. If you mean if it will be contrasting, it will certainly be! but if you are worried that they might be discordant, then my above post is still valid: I don't think so. However it also depends what else will be growing behind or front of those bushes. Can you grow in your place garden delphiniums? In my imagination I "saw" a group of towering light blue delphs behind, that would mellow the strong colours of J.C or Boscobel. In the front could be a row of light blue English lavenders. Also what kind of overall setting you are trying to achieve with these D.A.s? Perhaps an English cottage garden look? If so then mellowing the strong colours will be necessary in my modest view, with companion plantings. Other blues could be salvias and some of the catmints ( Nepeta).
Name: Lola
Tasmania
Keeps Sheep Roses Cottage Gardener Garden Photography Birds Farmer
Image
LolaTasmania
Jul 5, 2018 3:57 PM CST
Hi Arturo. How strange that you thought of delphiniums and lavender! I bought some delphiniums yesterday and have been digging up lavender seedlings from other areas just for that purpose. I think I will have to find something neutral to go between the roses to keep the pinks apart as I don't know how apricot/salmon/orange/peach each one will seem in my garden. I will try to find a white penstemon or something similarly spired, I think. I can't grow foxgloves because they seed everywhere and are becoming a problem in our native rainforest areas, otherwise they would be perfect.

I have to go back in to town next week so perhaps I can find something then. If I can find another small white/cream rose I will get it. Our new quarantine rules mean that plants are coming into the state in dribs and drabs rather than in large batches so I may stumble upon something that is perfect when I am not looking. Lola.
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin (Zone 8a)
Roses Dahlias Irises Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
hampartsum
Jul 5, 2018 4:53 PM CST
@LolaTasmania. I'm hesitant with Windermere in the centre because it is just too unpretending. My "view" is something very bold that will stand out and give character to the full group or on the contrary something relatively large but white so that it will break the possible excessive symetry. Do you grow Buddleya davidii there? There are white forms that might play that role. Also some of the Spiraeas. Please understand that my proposals are almost wild guesses because I really have very little understanding of your ultimate goals. Colour also is something related to the quality of light there. We both live aproximately at the same latitude south ( you at 41º 33 and me 41º 13), so therefore we enjoy long side lighting in relatively long sunsets and sunrises. This has great impact of how colour is seen. I don't know how bright are your skies in the growing season. Ours are very much so, so searching for a subdued pastel colouring is almost impossible for me, with most of rains concentrated now and later in early spring. But reading your average weather data you seem to have overcast weather in summer too, so my consideration might not apply there. Thus I indulge in bold colouring freely and keep away from pastel colouring (in spite on my great propension... Drooling ) in the summer garden.
I keep thinking .... alternatively from above, what about a tall growing D.A in the center boldly orange, but with old garden rose character i.e Grace/ Lady E Hamilton/ Crown Princess Marghareta or even Abraham Darby? These all will tend to merge JC and Boscobel into a warm center mellowing the ends with cooler soft pinks with SA on one end Ambridge the other.
Some of the many other species of Foxglove (Digitalis) could be an alternative, but I don't know what is available there. Common garden foxglove has been naturalized here and grows under our Southern beech forests (Nothofagus) which I know also grow in your state but I really wouldn't know which would not be invasive there. i.e Digitalis ferruginea

or


Yes, when you are not looking out for anything in particular the right plant pops to your sight! Hilarious! I wish you good luck in that sense Crossing Fingers!

Arturo
Name: Lola
Tasmania
Keeps Sheep Roses Cottage Gardener Garden Photography Birds Farmer
Image
LolaTasmania
Jul 5, 2018 5:42 PM CST
I think our light situations are the same. My house is painted a colour called Homestead which is a barn red colour but at different times of day and in different seasons it can be pink or brown as well. I think the idea of a white Spirea is great as I can keep it to a size that suits the situation. There is a white Buddleya that has a fragrance reminiscent of freesias that I may be able to get hold of as well. Both of these should look very good among my roses. Some days I yearn for brighter colours around the place but then the sun comes out in a way that makes strong colours scream. There is a fuschia I really admire but I know it will look terrible unless I create a separate garden for bright colours. Hmmm...maybe that is another project for the future. Lola.
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin (Zone 8a)
Roses Dahlias Irises Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
hampartsum
Jul 5, 2018 5:57 PM CST
Thank you Lola, I now get a better understanding of your present goals. Yes a Buddleya could be a very good alternative. They have bluish grey leaves and can be coppiced so they are always at the low shrub scale. Yes, the fragrance is also a good contribution. It will add texture to the rose bed.
Alternatively Spiraea Van Houttei has incredible warm fall colours which could bid a warm farewell towards the end of the growing season.
.
In late spring it is dressed like the photo! I grow both bushes here.

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