Daylilies forum: Do My Daylilies Need Dividing?

Page 1 of 2 • 1 2
Views: 301, Replies: 21 » Jump to the end
Name: Connie
Edmonton, Alberta area (Canada (Zone 3a)
Cat Lover Butterflies Foliage Fan Enjoys or suffers cold winters Daylilies Plays in the sandbox
Dragonflies Ferns Region: Canadian Peonies Bookworm Clematis
Image
conniepr27
Aug 9, 2018 5:54 AM CST
Question for you guys. Everything in my gardens are doing well except for my daylilies. Do they really have to be lifted and separated every three years in order to thrive? Cause that's the only thing I can think of that I'm not doing for them. The ones I'm watching have been getting smaller and smaller these past two years and they have been in place for 3-5 years without disturbing them.
Name: Stan
Florida Panhandle (Defuniak Sp (Zone 8b)
Region: Florida Region: Gulf Coast Enjoys or suffers hot summers Daylilies Lilies Keeps Horses
Dog Lover Garden Photography Butterflies Hummingbirder Birds Bee Lover
Image
GaNinFl
Aug 9, 2018 6:06 AM CST
Teresa, you can load pictures from your phone, the same as from you hom pc or laptop.

Connie, a lot smarter folks than I, should have some opinions regard lifting, division etc...
I've not lifted nor divided mine. I fertilize spring and again in fall and during bloom season the get water daily. I have some dormants that are dwindling and a few others. Dormants are expected to fade away here in Florida. But some of the other Evergreens and Semievergreens are planted to close to trees. They are suffering due to the roots choking them out.
Stan
(Georgia Native in Florida)
http://garden.org/blogs/view/G...
Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
There's a place of quiet rest !
Image
Hazelcrestmikeb
Aug 9, 2018 6:09 AM CST
Teresa You can send pics from your phone to G.O
That's what I do most of the time. Are you using a Android or iPhone
Android is anything other than a iPhone.
Connie it could be your zone. Some cultivars can't handle that extreme well. Are the clumps large ? Sometimes I have to relocate daylilies to another section of the garden for whatever reason due to performance.
Maybe we can get @Admmad to weigh in here. Are these dormant/decidious or evergreen ?
robinseeds.com
"Life as short as it is, is amazing isn't it ?" Michael Burton
"Be your best you".
Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
There's a place of quiet rest !
Image
Hazelcrestmikeb
Aug 9, 2018 6:14 AM CST
Stan we cross posted. I haven't divided much. I believe division is only needed if performance decrease or for personal reasons like being too big for the location etc.
robinseeds.com
"Life as short as it is, is amazing isn't it ?" Michael Burton
"Be your best you".
Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
There's a place of quiet rest !
Image
Hazelcrestmikeb
Aug 9, 2018 6:18 AM CST
We should also ask @Sooby, Sue since she lives one zone over and is extremely knowledgeable on daylilies.
robinseeds.com
"Life as short as it is, is amazing isn't it ?" Michael Burton
"Be your best you".
Name: Ginny G
Central Iowa (Zone 5a)
Plant Addict!!
Daylilies Peonies Enjoys or suffers cold winters Irises Hibiscus Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Bee Lover Native Plants and Wildflowers Lilies Garden Art Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Miniature Gardening
Image
Legalily
Aug 9, 2018 6:34 AM CST
Teresa my pictures are all from my iPhone or iPad. Works great.
Connie I only divide mine when they get too big. I do add some compost or fertilizer to them every year. I agree on asking someone in your zone but I would definitely add some organic matter.
Be a person that makes others feel special.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Aug 9, 2018 1:43 PM CST
Hazelcrestmikeb said:We should also ask @ Sooby, Sue since she lives one zone over and is extremely knowledgeable on daylilies.


Connie's question about dividing? Here it depends on the cultivar (or species). Some do seem to dwindle (and they aren't big enough clumps to need dividing) others just keep going with the same treatment. I have seen a species type that spread into a large area almost stop flowering whereas a piece of it moved somewhere else flowers enthusiastically so it can happen.

If the clumps are not huge, perhaps they are borderline hardy in zone 3? Do you get fluctuating winter temperatures like Calgary there? Can you name the cultivars that are dwindling in case we know what they do elsewhere?

Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
There's a place of quiet rest !
Image
Hazelcrestmikeb
Aug 10, 2018 5:24 AM CST
@Sooby, Sue thanks for chiming in I tip my hat to you.
robinseeds.com
"Life as short as it is, is amazing isn't it ?" Michael Burton
"Be your best you".
Name: Mary
Crown Point, Indiana (Zone 5b)
josieskid
Aug 10, 2018 7:52 AM CST
Would someone elaborate on the subject of sending pics from your phone? I have a samsung note 3.
Name: Maurice
Grey County, Ontario (Zone 4b)
Image
admmad
Aug 10, 2018 7:57 AM CST
conniepr27 said:Do they really have to be lifted and separated every three years in order to thrive? Cause that's the only thing I can think of that I'm not doing for them. The ones I'm watching have been getting smaller and smaller these past two years and they have been in place for 3-5 years without disturbing them.


As far as I know daylilies do not routinely needed to be divided every three years. How often they need to be divided depends on how fast they grow in their location and growing conditions. In Florida one hybridizer indicated that they divided their daylilies every autumn otherwise there was a noticeable effect. That was a commercial hybridizer who needed the highest rate of new fan production possible and the largest size fans possible. In other locations and under other growing conditions daylilies should not need dividing very often.

Is it possible that the daylilies that are dwindling have been affected by "spring sickness". Here, in my growing conditions, daylilies that have spring sickness suffer quite severely. They are usually much smaller fans after they recover, some of the fans die and it may take several years for them to grow large enough to bloom again. Daylilies that have suffered spring sickness here sometimes produce a clump of grassy-sized new fans when they recover.

Maurice
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Region: Alabama
Image
Seedfork
Aug 10, 2018 10:43 AM CST
@admmad,
I know there are more than one reason daylilies produce grassy looking foliage. I read that sometimes being grown in a cold climate and then being shipped to a warm climate will cause grassy foliage. I have read that the cure for that is to dig up the clump and replant each individual fan. I have tried that a few times and it seems to work, 'Taj Mahal' and 'Prairie Blue Eyes' are a couple I remember off hand. Does that work for plants with grassy foliage as a result from spring sickness?
Name: Maurice
Grey County, Ontario (Zone 4b)
Image
admmad
Aug 10, 2018 12:17 PM CST
Seedfork said: I know there are more than one reason daylilies produce grassy looking foliage. I read that sometimes being grown in a cold climate and then being shipped to a warm climate will cause grassy foliage. I have read that the cure for that is to dig up the clump and replant each individual fan. I have tried that a few times and it seems to work, 'Taj Mahal' and 'Prairie Blue Eyes' are a couple I remember off hand. Does that work for plants with grassy foliage as a result from spring sickness?


When a large fan is replaced by several much smaller fans (grassy) the logical conclusion is that the original growing point was killed by something and because of that loss of control several axillary growing points were released and grew into new small fans. The individual fans in a grassy clump will grow into larger fans with the passage of time - there should be no need to dig them up and separate them. Leaving them together will cause them to compete with each other but that is no different than the situation in any clump. There is no reason why it should not work with grassy foliage that was caused by spring sickness but there is also no obvious reason why it should be necessary. The catch with spring sickness is that the plant can have spring sickness repeatedly year after year or it can come and go with sometimes many years in between attacks of spring sickness.

Would 'warm' climate be defined by temperatures above 95F, above 100F, etc.?

Maurice
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Region: Alabama
Image
Seedfork
Aug 10, 2018 12:28 PM CST
I guess the same could be asked of a cold climate, but the article did not state the temps for either, so I just assumed it meant from north to south. My plants had come from the north. I did not read the article until after a couple of years of the plants staying grassy, then I divided them and the next year in both cases they were back to normal. But, I do suppose that they might have returned to normal on their on that year, or maybe even the next. Maybe dividing them and spacing them further apart so they are not in such stiff competition with each other could help?
Name: Connie
Edmonton, Alberta area (Canada (Zone 3a)
Cat Lover Butterflies Foliage Fan Enjoys or suffers cold winters Daylilies Plays in the sandbox
Dragonflies Ferns Region: Canadian Peonies Bookworm Clematis
Image
conniepr27
Aug 11, 2018 6:49 AM CST
Scooby, you asked for the names of the cultivars that are involved. The one I'm really worried about is Jolyene Nichole. Bought in 2012. Did fine the first few years, though always stayed small and never had more than 5-6 blooms each year. The last two summers it has been increasingly smaller and this year had only two small blooms on it. This is it today, although we just went through a record breaking heat wave for our area. I'm sure that'sthe reason for all the brown leaves:

Thumb of 2018-08-11/conniepr27/46061c

Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Aug 11, 2018 7:09 AM CST
Have you tried just moving it to a different spot? I have 'Jolyene Nichole', it usually flowers although don't think it did this year but it is right under a tree that was small when I originally put the daylily there, so isn't in the best position. It did flower last year. It's been in the same place, undivided, since 2003 and I've had it several years longer than that so it's certainly hardy in zone 4.

On my list of plants with "spring sickness" it is listed as having none.

Have you fertilized it at all? Does it get watered - I see you have purslane growing there which usually likes dry spots?
Name: Connie
Edmonton, Alberta area (Canada (Zone 3a)
Cat Lover Butterflies Foliage Fan Enjoys or suffers cold winters Daylilies Plays in the sandbox
Dragonflies Ferns Region: Canadian Peonies Bookworm Clematis
Image
conniepr27
Aug 11, 2018 8:09 AM CST
Sooby, I will be moving it. That's the only thing I can think of to do for it. I feed it; not a lot, but I do. I top with manure once or twice a year; not a lot, maybe a cup or two sprinkled around it. I give it a bit extra water when I think of it.

I will dig it up today as the weather is going to be more reasonable for a few days, and examine the roots, and then place it in a better area, with better soil, and where I will see it every single day.

One person mentioned extra fans. Maybe, if there are more, I could separate them? Hope for more plants?
Name: Connie
Edmonton, Alberta area (Canada (Zone 3a)
Cat Lover Butterflies Foliage Fan Enjoys or suffers cold winters Daylilies Plays in the sandbox
Dragonflies Ferns Region: Canadian Peonies Bookworm Clematis
Image
conniepr27
Aug 11, 2018 8:13 AM CST
Sooby, I used to pull the purslane, but the past few years I decided to leave it and see if it is a decent groundcover. We are zone 3 so what some people call invasive weeds are not necessarily so here. Not sure with this one. What do you think?
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Aug 11, 2018 9:25 AM CST
Purslane is just about everywhere (apparently does not like mulched gardens though) and some people eat it. A plant is only a weed if you don't want it where it is growing so it's entirely your preference whether to classify it as a weed or groundcover.
Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
There's a place of quiet rest !
Image
Hazelcrestmikeb
Aug 11, 2018 11:54 AM CST
Purslane is a weed in my book Whistling it is hard to get rid of. I mainly see it by my mail box area. Comes back every year despite my weeding efforts. Next step is to paint it with something special Rolling on the floor laughing
robinseeds.com
"Life as short as it is, is amazing isn't it ?" Michael Burton
"Be your best you".
Name: Sharon
McGregor IA (Zone 4b)
caitlinsgarden
Aug 11, 2018 4:06 PM CST
The more often you divide your DLs, the easier it is. Often they will still bloom even if very densely packed, but they are the devil to divide and separate when they get like that.

Page 1 of 2 • 1 2

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Daylilies forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by krobra and is called "Red, White and Pink"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.