Roses forum: Rose leaves

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7b
Tkhan
Aug 29, 2018 7:26 AM CST
Hi all
Some pics of my PAOK leaves
What is it ?

Thumb of 2018-08-29/Tkhan/b1c9a2
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Thumb of 2018-08-29/Tkhan/95b119
Thumb of 2018-08-29/Tkhan/471dab
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Thumb of 2018-08-29/Tkhan/36a883
Thumb of 2018-08-29/Tkhan/f34323

Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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porkpal
Aug 29, 2018 9:20 AM CST
Some sort of fungus, but not quite typical of Black Spot.
Porkpal
Name: Jim
Central Pa. (Zone 6a)
Image
jim1961
Aug 29, 2018 9:32 AM CST
I see insect damage in that second pic... Other pics look like porkpal said, some type of leaf fungus...
As the end of the season draws near leaves can do some funky things...Whats your general location? Thanks!
(Zone 9b)
roseseek
Aug 29, 2018 9:33 AM CST
It looks like old foliage, rather than new. It could be any number of "spotting" type diseases. If this is the older foliage, lower on the plant, I would consider simply pulling it off and letting Nature take its course. If it's most of the plant or newer foliage, I will let those who spray suggest what to use. Knowing hold old the plant is, how much of the foliage is affected like this and whether it's lower, older leaves or newer or most of it, will help.
7b
Tkhan
Aug 29, 2018 10:21 AM CST
Ok so I'm located zone 7
Brooklyn NY extreme heat wave
This was planted this year in MARCH OR APRIL Gorgeous huge flowers and lovely foliage and suddenly in 2 days this is what I saw
My England's rose had black spot and I had to get rid of most of the foliage It was planted the same time
they are both in containers These leaves appeared different from the typical black spot
Very hot and humid here
Name: John
Helensville, New Zealand
Image
S124AB
Aug 29, 2018 1:05 PM CST
Some of my older ones do this. I think it's a mixture of end of season leaves (possibly aggravated by drought), along with a couple of black spot features and one of the many types of rose mosaic viruses. Just collect the leaves when they fall or are about to, and burn or dispose of.
Name: Paul
Utah (Zone 5b)
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Paul2032
Aug 29, 2018 1:08 PM CST
Rose Mosaic....I agree with S124AB.
Paul Smith Pleasant Grove, Utah
7b
Tkhan
Aug 29, 2018 1:11 PM CST
This is a pic of the roses WC Iin the back (that's my survivor)
PAOK in the middle and England's rose in front


Thumb of 2018-08-29/Tkhan/5f43d5


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Thumb of 2018-08-29/Tkhan/f03c7c
Thumb of 2018-08-29/Tkhan/4063a7

7b
Tkhan
Aug 29, 2018 1:13 PM CST
ROSE MOSAIC
WHAT DO I DO ?
Name: Mike Stewart
Lower Hudson Valley, NY (Zone 6b)
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Mike
Aug 29, 2018 1:35 PM CST
That doesn't look like rose mosaic virus to me. RMV typically shows mosaic-shaped yellow designs in an otherwise green leaf; in other words, there's typically more green then yellow in the leaf. In your case you have the opposite. But even if it were RMV, there's nothing you can do, and there's really nothing to worry about. It can't spread from one plant to another. Some claim that RMV can shorten the life of a rose in cold climates like New York's, but even so, a rose can last for years with RMV. I take a rather cavalier attitude toward RMV, and find the designs interesting when they look like this:

Thumb of 2018-08-29/Mike/3f10ad

[Last edited by Mike - Aug 29, 2018 1:36 PM (+)]
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7b
Tkhan
Aug 29, 2018 2:53 PM CST
Thanks
I might leave them alone
I learned from my WC that if the rose is a fighter it will survive
Let's see what happens and let nature take its course
Name: Mike Stewart
Lower Hudson Valley, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Photography I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Roses Seed Starter Container Gardener Bulbs
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Mike
Aug 29, 2018 3:40 PM CST
I think what you have is common black spot, although to Porkpal's point, black spot fungus can appear in different patterns. Sometimes you will have actual spots; other times it looks more spread out and "feathery" on the edges. Its appearance can change with time, and depending on how far advanced it has become on a given leaf. I would remove your infected leaves. Also, try to water your plant at ground level rather than "overhead". In other words, try not to have water running and dripping through the leaves - that is how black spot is spread.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Aug 29, 2018 3:44 PM CST
Is black spot actually a specific disease or is it a generic term for any spotty black fungus on roses?
Porkpal
Name: Mike Stewart
Lower Hudson Valley, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Photography I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Roses Seed Starter Container Gardener Bulbs
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Mike
Aug 29, 2018 3:46 PM CST
Black spot is caused by the Diplocarpon rosae fungus, of which there are different strains. The appearance and effects can vary, depending on the rose variety and the strain of the fungus, so you may see different symptoms:

Typically, a rapidly enlarging purplish or black patch appears on the upper leaf surface, with diffuse and radiating strands of the fungus sometimes visible. The sixth photo is a good example of where an initial black spot has spread out in a feathery pattern, which you can see on the edges.

Sometimes the leaf may turn yellow around the spots (as seen above), and the leaf often drops.

At other times, the yellow color does not appear, but infected leaves may still drop.

Sometimes, the spots remain relatively small and the leaf does not drop.

Small, black, scabby lesions may also appear on young stems.
[Last edited by Mike - Aug 29, 2018 4:10 PM (+)]
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7b
Tkhan
Aug 29, 2018 6:39 PM CST
Thank you
I hate using chemical sprays This year I have avoided them altogether except for some insecticidal soap spray on my Gaillardia and one of my jasmine
Should I worry that the fungus will destroy the roses ?
And I used a mild baking soda spray for the England's rose which was in very bad shape within the black spot !!!
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member Dog Lover Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry Keeps Horses I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Plant Identifier Raises cows Roses Farmer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
porkpal
Aug 29, 2018 6:44 PM CST
Thanks, Mike. I have often wondered whether there were different fungi or just different symptoms.
Porkpal
Name: Mike Stewart
Lower Hudson Valley, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Photography I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Roses Seed Starter Container Gardener Bulbs
Peonies Clematis Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Dog Lover Cat Lover Birds
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Mike
Aug 29, 2018 6:51 PM CST
Black spot doesn't destroy roses, per se. Rather, it weakens them through loss of foliage, because leaves produce food for the plant through photosynthesis. Interestingly, some roses will still bloom after the loss of a lot of their leaves (for a while, anyway), presumably because roots can still send up nutrients (especially phosphorous) needed for blooms, and carbohydrates are stored in the canes. But ultimately, you need healthy foliage for a healthy plant. Most fungicides are preventive in nature, meaning they help to prevent the fungus from infecting a plant or prevent it from spreading to uninfected leaves. But few fungicides (with the exception of Pentathlon, for example) will kill the fungus on contact.
7b
Tkhan
Aug 29, 2018 9:05 PM CST
Thank you Mike
(Zone 5b)
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Tisha
Aug 30, 2018 9:03 AM CST
What does baking soda do?
Simple on a Schedule
7b
Tkhan
Aug 30, 2018 10:13 AM CST
Tisha it works by changing the pH It's more of a preventative solution
I called up David Austin roses and asked them and they recommended 1 tbs with few drops of dish soap in one gallon of water
But to kill the fungus they said to use Bayer fungicide

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