Daylilies forum: Time to cull?

Views: 664, Replies: 18 » Jump to the end
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan (Zone 5b)

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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frankrichards16
Sep 2, 2018 11:24 AM CST
I have a line of Daylilies that I purchased in 2013. They look ok, but...

Most are yellow.

Hemerocallis 'Carolyn Criswell', Hemerocallis 'Geo. Caleb Bingham', Hemerocallis 'Ginger Whip', Hemerocallis 'Mountain Snow', Hemerocallis 'Optimism', Hemerocallis 'Organdy Eve', Hemerocallis 'Patio Parade', Hemerocallis 'Polly Posy', Hemerocallis 'Saucy Flourish', Hemerocallis 'Silver Fan', Hemerocallis 'Summer Wine', Hemerocallis 'Washington Park', Hemerocallis 'Yellowstone'

I like patio parade, Saucy Flourish and Summer Wine.

Any opinions on the others?

Thumb of 2018-09-02/frankrichards16/30595e

Name: Tina
Greenup, Ky (Zone 6b)
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beenthere
Sep 2, 2018 12:43 PM CST
I don't have any advice on the others, having no experience with those CV's. But, from one gardener to another, keep what you love, cull what you don't. I culled some wonderful plants this year that just were not going to work on my hill. 45 degree slope, large flowers and one day not deadheading, and the scapes started leaning. A lot. Not your situation, obviously. But those daylilies would have become a burden, a chore that would have taken away from my enjoyment of gardening. If it doesn't bring a smile to my face, each and every day, it's gone. Life's too short and there are so, so many other daylilies to choose from.
Name: Tim
West Chicago, IL (Zone 5a)
Daylilies Native Plants and Wildflowers Vegetable Grower
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Lyshack
Sep 2, 2018 6:09 PM CST
I don't envy your position.

I would try to make a process out of reducing them. I'd pick a low percentage, like 5-10% and say "OK, I'm only going to keep this many". Then I'd note their branching, bloom counts, rebloom, eye/watermark or other desired characteristics, and I'd pick the "best ones", by objective stats. Those plants would be the most likely to help you advance your goals.

But that's me. If I didn't make a process out of it and break it down statistically, I'd have a hard time deciding what to cull.
Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
There's a place of quiet rest !
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Hazelcrestmikeb
Sep 3, 2018 6:43 AM CST
A family friend want some plants. She said that she would take any thing nodding
I have a few noids and multiple of others that I am sooo willing to part with due to a upcoming major front garden remake and new seedling bed addition.
robinseeds.com
"Life as short as it is, is amazing isn't it ?" Michael Burton
"Be your best you".
Name: Vickie
Elberfeld, Indiana, USA (Zone 6b)
Bee Lover Garden Photography Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Region: United States of America
Region: Indiana Garden Art Annuals Clematis Cottage Gardener Garden Ideas: Level 2
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blue23rose
Sep 3, 2018 7:32 AM CST
I don't have any of those cv's either, so don't know about those.

I agree with @lyshack, Tim's method. I have given away about 50-60 daylilies in the last two years because I have run out of room. If I didn't absolutely love it, I dug it, and it gets easier the more I do it. Just 3 years ago, I could not do it.
Vickie
May all your weeds be wildflowers. ~Author Unknown
Name: Diana
Lincoln, NE (Zone 5b)
Daylilies Region: Nebraska Organic Gardener Dog Lover Bookworm
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ShakespearesGarden
Sep 3, 2018 7:45 AM CST
I'm about to hit that "don't love it, so it's gotta go" spot. There are some that won't replant this fall (I have to re-do three beds), I have too many seeds, too many others I'd rather keep (and buy) and I know exactly which ones I won't miss. My cull list is short and sweet...
Scout's motto: Be Prepared...
Name: Sue Petruske
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
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petruske
Sep 3, 2018 8:52 AM CST
beenthere said:If it doesn't bring a smile to my face, each and every day, it's gone.


Thank you for this statement. I'll remember it when I'm trying to make "breathing" room in the gardens. I tossed out most of a NOID iris and it felt so good after I did it. That surprised me. Hurray!
Name: Mary
Crown Point, Indiana (Zone 5b)
josieskid
Sep 6, 2018 11:49 AM CST
Tim, sounds like a very good method Thumbs up It should work!
Name: Nancy
Bowling Green Kentucky (Zone 6b)
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alilyfan
Sep 6, 2018 7:56 PM CST
I like Tim's method. I have kept a lot of daylilies, I have the space, but now find I don't have the energy to take care of this many. I am slowly working on getting rid of those I am tired of, or just don't perform that well. I want to get a collection of really good, long blooming daylilies. Problem is, I really do like almost all of them.
Name: Mary
Crown Point, Indiana (Zone 5b)
josieskid
Sep 7, 2018 6:14 AM CST
Yeah, energy. I just started hybridizing daylilies last year, so I'm gonna try not to get overrun. With all the ugly seedlings I've produced so far, that might not be so hard!
Name: Nancy
Bowling Green Kentucky (Zone 6b)
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alilyfan
Sep 7, 2018 7:01 AM CST
Oh yes, I try a bit of simple hybridizing, lots of ugly ducklings, but every year seems like I get more keepers. This could end up being a major problem.
Name: Davi (Judy) Davisson
Sherrills Ford, NC (Zone 7a)
Davi
Sep 8, 2018 3:00 AM CST
Back in the day when I was trying to "collect them all", I found my garden overrun by yellow daylilies because yellow seemed to be the "bonus plant" of choice on every order that I received. There is a reason for that. Yellow just doesn't sell well online because it is hard to tell the differences from an online photo....many yellows look pretty much the same unless you can locate a "whole plant" photo. One year, I decided to clear the garden of all the yellows. Then the next year, my garden was a boring disaster without all those pops of yellow that draw your eye to them. So make sure you save the ones that draw your eye to them from clear across the yard, Frank....or you'll miss them! I cull based on what I no longer look at and admire in my walks around the garden.

Culling is one of the most difficult things to learn as a hybridizer, but if you don't learn to be ruthless and let go of some things, you will quickly run out of space. I find it easier to pick the good stuff!!! Here's my routine:
Year 1: plant seedlings 6" apart in a new seedling bed

Year 2: pick the best of what blooms and move those seedlings to a hole of their own where they have space to clump up and develop. Selections should be made based on your goals as a hybridizer.

Year 3: the bed is now a "last chance bed"....pick anything you missed (there won't be many) and move anything that looks great to a hole of its own. Then clear out everything that is left in that bed in the fall and prepare the bed for next year's seeds. Do NOT look at cross markers while you are clearing the bed or you will second guess what "should" have looked good.
Name: Vickie
Elberfeld, Indiana, USA (Zone 6b)
Bee Lover Garden Photography Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Region: United States of America
Region: Indiana Garden Art Annuals Clematis Cottage Gardener Garden Ideas: Level 2
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blue23rose
Sep 8, 2018 6:04 AM CST
Great advice Judy!

How does a person make sure they have sufficiently cleared out an area to make room for new seedlings? I cleared out an area of some seedlings last year, but found that I must have left a few tiny pieces behind, because now I have a few NOID seedlings coming up. I almost hate to put anything back in that part of the garden for fear of getting things mixed up. I need to be more careful when culling D'Oh!

I also have a working area where I clean and separate my daylilies and found a daylily growing out of the mulch. It sure doesn't take much for them to start growing again.
Vickie
May all your weeds be wildflowers. ~Author Unknown
Name: Mary
Crown Point, Indiana (Zone 5b)
josieskid
Sep 8, 2018 7:31 AM CST
Thank's Judy, for your words of wisdom. I've always found it hard to incorporate yellows because all the ones sold locally look so alike to me. I see some I would like to have online, but they can be pricey! If they're big, I'd like them. I have Spider Miracle and it's really nice.

Name: Davi (Judy) Davisson
Sherrills Ford, NC (Zone 7a)
Davi
Sep 8, 2018 10:33 AM CST
Vickie
Once my last chance seedling bed is dug and cleared, I usually put it to use again with fresh compost added to plant some cold weather veggies...lettuce, spinach, broccoli, kale, etc. So the bed gets dug a second time when I remove the veggies. Then it gets turned again with additives for the seedlings in early spring. Turning the bed more than once disrupts the life cycle of bug larvae, too. We have a very long growing season here so if anything remains from digging the daylilies, it will usually sprout before the new seedlings are planted out in April. The worst mistake I ever made was planting some of those tiny Yukon Gold potatoes in the veggie garden as I left bits and pieces of potatoes in the bed that were a bugger to get out when they sprouted!
Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
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CaliFlowers
Sep 8, 2018 11:27 AM CST
Just from the picture, and from what I've seen in the database, I'd definitely keep that big yellow near the middle. (Patio Parade?)

With a large property, I'd concentrate on taller, robust plants that stand up to be noticed as part of the overall view. Then I'd look for the most sunfast of the rich colors. Visiting daylily gardens is really the only practical way to find out what will look the best throughout the day. It's not usually the most expensive or the fanciest.

When I started collecting daylilies, I wasn't all that knowledgeable or discriminating, I think that's the way most people get started. Also, there were no nearby places to view a wide range of daylilies in garden situations. As a result, I bought a lot of plants by their catalog descriptions and images which turned out to be "also-rans". (at least in my climate)

Through attrition and a little culling, the numbers were pared down somewhat, but it can be difficult to toss a daylily, particularly if it wasn't cheap. I share quite a bit with friends and interested passers-by, but I won't share the "dogs", because that's no way to generate interest in daylilies. When I get a new plant, or divide one, I'll set aside a fan or two in 1-gallon pots just for gifts or trades.

My favorite plants to share are Vintage Bordeaux, Custard Candy, Caprician Fiesta, Bold Encounter, Walnut Creek, Quick Results, Cameroons, Cameroon Night, and Boney Maroney. They increase decently, so I always have plenty, they open well here, put on a good show, and hold up well in the afternoons. If someone wants a tall plant, I'll give them a piece of Notify Ground Crew.

I have a couple of favorite "landscaper" seedlings that go out occasionally too. A big tall purple UF from Thin Man x Cameroon Night, and a big, wide-open, sunfast tropical pink from Frank Gladney x Serena Sunburst that I probably should have named in the late 80s. (Oh, well...)
Name: Mike
Hazel Crest, IL (Zone 5b)
There's a place of quiet rest !
Image
Hazelcrestmikeb
Sep 8, 2018 2:25 PM CST
Stan you play the horses ? "Also ran"
Whistling
I love the big yellows also.
robinseeds.com
"Life as short as it is, is amazing isn't it ?" Michael Burton
"Be your best you".
Name: Mary
Crown Point, Indiana (Zone 5b)
josieskid
Sep 8, 2018 2:30 PM CST
Ken, very interesting! And how nice of you not to stick friends and family with "daylily dogs"!
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Sep 10, 2018 7:31 AM CST
blue23rose,
Thanks for asking that question.
Davie thanks for the answer. I have a couple of beds I am going to have to dig and was concerned about how to prevent new seedlings from generating from the old ones. I had critters dig one bed for me, they dug up plants and tags. So I had a huge open spot in the bed, but after several months I was surprised to see how many seedlings popped back up.
[Last edited by Seedfork - Sep 10, 2018 2:55 PM (+)]
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