Roses forum→Disbudding to encourage better growth?

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Name: Shyam
San Francisco, CA (Zone 10b)
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Rose_Guy1127
Sep 4, 2018 8:22 PM CST
My DA Claire Austin is growing well and free of diseases and pest, so far. Lately, I observed increased sprouting of buds but no new cane/basal growth unlike its peers such as The Poet's Wife and Princess Alexandra of Kent. I had an inkling that this rose was a kind of rose that "bloomed to death." I went with my instinct, and from the knowledge, I've gained from reading online articles and books by Clayton Reddell, to disbud the side buds thereby leaving one terminal bud per stem. My rationale for doing so, correct me if I am wrong, was that with several buds sprouting, the plant would be directing all the nutrients on blooming instead of establishing a stronger root mass and overall top growth of the plant itself. I would like to hear everyone's thought on this.


Thumb of 2018-09-05/Rose_Guy1127/6d41bb
The buds were double in the number of what you see in the image. The image was taken after disbudding.

(Zone 9b)
roseseek
Sep 5, 2018 8:32 AM CST
Some will grow OR bloom, but not both. Any plant you wish to push to maturity faster will benefit from disbudding. We practice it in many ways. Exhibitors dis bud to push larger, but fewer flowers. When you plant young fruit trees, you prevent them from producing fruit to push them to maturity faster and to prevent limb damage from heavy fruit. Later, then you thin the produced fruit to form fewer but larger pieces of fruit and, again, limit any damage over production might result in. With roses, some will require dis budding to get any performance from. Some will produce what you want, faster, when dis budded. Some are sufficiently vigorous they don't require any such attention, but ALL will mature more quickly if you prevent them from flowering, or limit the amount of flowers they produce.

When you consider really "miffy" types, such as Church Mouse, Fantan, Grey Pearl and some others, if you don't prevent them from flowering to push growth, they WILL literally flower themselves to death. Perhaps they should have been allowed to throw themselves into oblivion, but we Humans are notorious for our "unnatural selection", keeping unsuccessful genetic combinations of all types in the gene pool which would otherwise have died out.
Name: Shyam
San Francisco, CA (Zone 10b)
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Rose_Guy1127
Sep 5, 2018 12:32 PM CST
@roseseek: That was educational, thanks! I will disbud a few more because I would like to push it to maturity. To me, an overall establishment of the rose takes precedence over the bloom factor.
Name: Kris Legault
Southern Oregon (Zone 8a)
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Kristinelego
Sep 5, 2018 12:40 PM CST
My new lady of Shallot is so young with so many buds, way too many.
I disbud all of the side buds and cut back the really puny canes. It will make it stronger in the long run.
You can't plant your new favorite rose if you are still watering your least favorite
Name: Bonnie
Texas
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RosesnTx
Sep 5, 2018 1:14 PM CST
How do you know when to stop disbudding a rose?
Name: Shyam
San Francisco, CA (Zone 10b)
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Rose_Guy1127
Sep 5, 2018 1:51 PM CST
@RosesnTx: That's a great question! I am guessing one disbuds until the rose has well matured. Now in terms of maturity, I guess that could be subjective as a rosarian's view of rose maturity might be different from another rosarian's view. @roseseek, what's your take on this?
(Zone 9b)
roseseek
Sep 5, 2018 3:43 PM CST
RosesnTx said:How do you know when to stop disbudding a rose?


When the plant before you is what you wanted/expected it to be. When you are to the point where you WILL enjoy some flowers or you don't want the plant. All of the above?

It depends upon why you are doing it. If it's a climber you want large enough to put into the ground, you keep doing it until the plant is big enough to safely let loose in the yard. With Grey Pearl, I continuously pull off flower buds to force the blamed things to grow so there will be new shoots with more buds to use for propagation. When I managed Limberlost Nursery in the San Fernando Valley, I would plant the yellow Tea Noisettes as bare roots in five gallon nursery cans to get them started, then upsize them into fifteens and start feeding and pushing them. Landscapers and people who wanted "instant garden" weren't interested in a one or two cane wonder, five gallon plant. They wanted an eight to ten foot tall, branched and flowering Cl Tea or Noisette. It only required two or three months in that heat, watering every other day and feeding weekly/weakly to produce that.

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