Roses forum: Climbing rose

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Name: Margy Stinson
Huntington, IN - near Fort Way (Zone 5b)
help moving an established peony
Margy
Sep 9, 2018 6:54 AM CST
I am confused how to train a climbing rose. If I tie it to the trellis that means that compacts the stems. On rose bushes we are told to leave them open so air can move through them. However, I've read that climbing roses need to be helped to climb on the trellis. I do have a problem with black spot and have had minimal blooms on my climbing rose which is several years old.
Thanks.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Sep 9, 2018 7:07 AM CST
If you can use a trellis that allows you to train the rose horizontally (out rather than up) it will get better air circulation and bloom a lot more.
Porkpal
Name: Anna Z.
Monroe, WI
Charter ATP Member Greenhouse Cat Lover Raises cows Region: Wisconsin
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AnnaZ
Sep 9, 2018 9:20 AM CST
I bought a rose at Menards that was labeled "climbing".............hah! If that is a climbing rose I'll run a marathon. Someone forgot to tell the rose it was supposed to climb, not huddle to the ground. I may dig it up and next year put a couple of hyacinth bean seeds there to climb. We know how THOSE can scamper up a trellis. It was supposed to climb on a portion of the south side of my pergola; I was going to put something up when it started to make shoots. Not gonna happen. But it will for hyacinth beans.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Sep 9, 2018 11:23 AM CST
Poor rose must not have read its label.
Porkpal
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Sep 9, 2018 12:46 PM CST
AnnaZ said:I bought a rose at Menards that was labeled "climbing".............hah! If that is a climbing rose I'll run a marathon. Someone forgot to tell the rose it was supposed to climb, not huddle to the ground. I may dig it up and next year put a couple of hyacinth bean seeds there to climb. We know how THOSE can scamper up a trellis. It was supposed to climb on a portion of the south side of my pergola; I was going to put something up when it started to make shoots. Not gonna happen. But it will for hyacinth beans.


How long ago did you plant the rose ?

Roses grow their roots first. If a rose is genetically programmed to be a large rose like a climbing rose, it will need to create a larger root mass to support the top growth.

The saying, "First year, they sleep. Second year, they creep. Third year, they leap." is especially true for climbing roses ... Smiling

I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Sep 9, 2018 1:41 PM CST
Roses don't have "tendrils" to help them climb. I don't know if your rose is establishing itself (root wise) or if it needs to be tied to the trellis (or whatever you have for it to climb on). I know my climbers took a bit to get established before they finally started growing taller. Part of it was me and how I tied it to my arch and part is that they are own root and take a bit to become established.

Here is a video on climbing roses. Paul can be a bit much but it still informative nonetheless.
https://youtu.be/DR4BIPOG7kM
Name: Anna Z.
Monroe, WI
Charter ATP Member Greenhouse Cat Lover Raises cows Region: Wisconsin
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AnnaZ
Sep 9, 2018 2:22 PM CST
Just planted it this spring. Maybe give it another year???
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Sep 9, 2018 2:23 PM CST
Yes, by all means. I assumed you had it much longer.
Porkpal
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Sep 9, 2018 7:22 PM CST
Oh yea. I find my roses take at least three years to become established and some took as long as five.
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
Sep 9, 2018 8:29 PM CST
In my lousy soil and high summer temps, I think it takes any rose about four years to become established.

Years ago, I read that photosynthesis slows down in high temps, so even tho' my roses do not go summer dormant, I do think this slows down their development.
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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zuzu
Sep 9, 2018 9:34 PM CST

Moderator

Margy said:I am confused how to train a climbing rose. If I tie it to the trellis that means that compacts the stems.


Tie the canes to the trellis with velcro garden tape. It's easy to adjust or reposition the tape if the stems are getting compacted.

Here's an article I once wrote for this site on training climbing roses. Maybe it will be helpful.

https://garden.org/ideas/view/...
Name: Margy Stinson
Huntington, IN - near Fort Way (Zone 5b)
help moving an established peony
Margy
Sep 10, 2018 7:52 AM CST
OK - I've looked at the uTube by Paul at Perkins and Roses - very helpful. My problem is that my climbing rose is several years old and I have been cutting it back - ALL of it every fall, even the main stems. I'm concerned how to go from here to revive this established climber.
Thanks for all the helps.
Thanks.
Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Sep 10, 2018 1:24 PM CST
Paul will answer your question at about the 4 minute mark
https://www.youtube.com/watch?...

You will need to choose some canes from the base to start as your main cane and go from there. Here is another nice video on training and pruning climbers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?...
Name: Margy Stinson
Huntington, IN - near Fort Way (Zone 5b)
help moving an established peony
Margy
Sep 11, 2018 7:18 AM CST
Excellent advice - especially in the youtube videos? Thanks so much.
Thanks.

Toolbelt68
Sep 11, 2018 3:45 PM CST
My experience, which is very limited because I only have 3 or 4 types of climbers, is that they don't wind around things as they go upward. They just produce long canes that tend to go upward -- like a tree. Rose bushes are just that, bushes. Climbers are not bushes. So, tie them to any structure that you have, keeping in mind that some of the climbers produce very strong canes almost from the get-go. Those strong canes will not take bending so do it early on!! Think of a fly rod and how it bends. Strong at the bottom, flimsy at the top.
Climbers bloom at the top, so if you want a ton of blooms start the bending right away up to about 3 feet then go horizontal. Along the top of a fence for example. The canes will then produce more canes (laterals) that will try to upward. Thus you end up with a ton of canes with blooms all over them.
As for starting over, it has been suggested to me (I have the same problem -- old canes) that I just cut them back all the way, right down to the base. Then ask the good Lord to cause them to produce some new canes ( I think they are called Balsa canes). Follow the above with the new canes and you should have good results. It says here in the fine print, at the bottom of the page.... lol
Something like this:

Thumb of 2018-09-11/Toolbelt68/339395

[Last edited by Toolbelt68 - Sep 11, 2018 3:57 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1815720 (15)
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Sep 11, 2018 4:25 PM CST
Your rose is spectacular. Toolbelt. Which one is it?
Porkpal

Toolbelt68
Sep 11, 2018 5:49 PM CST
Porkpal, They are Zephirine Drouhin a Bourbon rose. Two cover the gate entrance trellis with another on each side. I have about 60 of them around the place. Most are close to 20 years old.
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Sep 11, 2018 6:16 PM CST
60? Oh my goodness! It must be a beautiful site to behold. Thanks for sharing your experience with climbers and that very, very pretty photo.
Coastal Southern California (Zone 13a)
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jerijen
Sep 13, 2018 6:37 PM CST
The better climbers are those that were BRED as climbers. They're usually better quantity bloomers than climbing sports of bush roses. We (long ago) grew the climbing sport of 'Peace' for 5 years . . . for a total of about 5 blooms.

OTOH, 'Fourth of July' (LCl) blooms like a house afire, and has since it was introduced in 1999.
http://www.helpmefind.com/rose...
Thumb of 2018-09-14/jerijen/1e10c9

Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Sep 14, 2018 4:35 PM CST
Jeri, how was the heirloom expo?

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