Cactus and Succulents forum: Pachypodium Lamerei propagation, repotting

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almamons
Sep 9, 2018 9:51 AM CST
Few weeks ago I bought Pachypodium Lamerei a.k.a. Madagascar palm. From the pictures below you can see that it desperately needs repotting. I have no problem with repotting, but should I do propagation too? Is it necessary at this point? I'm afraid that if I don't divide the main plant and the two smaller ones, they won't grow properly. It's the first time I own this plant and there's a big chance I'll mess something up while dividing them. Youtube wasn't helpful at all.

Bonus question, does it look healthy? I see that tpis on some leaves are drying.

Thank you!
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Name: Stefan
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skopjecollection
Sep 9, 2018 11:11 AM CST
Id like to point out a few things:
Its not a lamerii, its pachypodium geayi, it has thinner leaves
Madagascar Palm (Pachypodium geayi)
Pachypodium doesnt make offshoots, and from what i can see, the parts are conjoined. This means that they are branches, and you shouldnt split them.
Leaf tips drying out is perfectly normal, even losing them too. Sometimes the plant can go dormant if kept dry and lose all its leaves. Rot will be different....
Finally, it might need coarser less organic soil, because it likes frequent watering...
[Last edited by skopjecollection - Sep 9, 2018 11:21 AM (+)]
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almamons
Sep 9, 2018 11:35 AM CST
skopjecollection said:Id like to point out a few things:
Its not a lamerii, its pachypodium geayi, it has thinner leaves
Madagascar Palm (Pachypodium geayi)
Pachypodium doesnt make offshoots, and from what i can see, the parts are conjoined. This means that they are branches, and you shouldnt split them.
Leaf tips drying out is perfectly normal, even losing them too. Sometimes the plant can go dormant if kept dry and lose all its leaves. Rot will be different....
Finally, it might need coarser less organic soil, because it likes frequent watering...


Thank you for that clarification. It was sold to me as Lamerii (name sticker) in local flower shop. So I guess is not good idea to split them after all.
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Sep 9, 2018 11:42 AM CST

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I think it could be P. geayi, but that difference doesn't matter at all as far as how fast they grow or what kind of care they require. Where those 2 species differ most is in flowering size, which is related to branching. Pachypdium geayi flowers much later in life, at a taller size, and thus has fewer branches for its size.

The basal branches (which can be removed with a blade) can be used to start new plants if you so choose. I would never do that personally, because a multi-stemmed plant looks better than a single stemmed plant at maturity. I would view it as a net loss, not a net gain, to have 3 single-stemmed plants instead of 1 triple-stemmed one.

Almamons, your plant is rocketing forward at this point. The most obvious evidence of that is the green color of the stem on the branches (a sure sign they are brand new) and the overall leafiness. Leaves have been retained almost all the way to the base of the plant.

Take a look at this general background page on the genus

The Pachypodiums Database

You can expect 2 seasons for the plant: a season of active growth usually from late spring through late summer, and a season of rest during late fall and winter. It is perfectly normal for a Pachypodium to lose all its leaves in winter when temperatures dip and light is low. That is a sign to back off on the watering until new leaves emerge perhaps weeks or months later. As a general rule, water more often when the plant is in leaf (for me, in our mild climate, that means twice a week) and less often when it starts to go leafless (maybe every 2-3 weeks when it has no leaves).

Use fast draining soil (like 50% pumice, perlite, or equivalent) and be sure the new container has a hole at the bottom. Provide as much light as possible if the plant will be indoors (like right by your sunniest window in Novi Sad).
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Sep 9, 2018 11:46 AM (+)]
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Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
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skopjecollection
Sep 9, 2018 11:43 AM CST
You wont be the only fooled by a label. Unless its an expert high end nursery, pretty much all labels are kind of redundant. Some give out ambiguous common names,some give genus(which may have lots of species), and some are just silly....
Нема проблем.
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Garden Procrastinator Bulbs Foliage Fan
Purslane Bromeliad Container Gardener Houseplants Sedums Sempervivums
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skopjecollection
Sep 9, 2018 11:44 AM CST
Baja, i looked up info on how to tell them apart
https://davesgarden.com/commun...,

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almamons
Sep 9, 2018 11:57 AM CST
Baja_Costero said:I think it could be P. geayi, but that difference doesn't matter at all as far as how fast they grow or what kind of care they require. Where those 2 species differ most is in flowering size, which is related to branching. Pachypdium geayi flowers much later in life, at a taller size, and thus has fewer branches for its size.

The basal branches (which can be removed with a blade) can be used to start new plants if you so choose. I would never do that personally, because a multi-stemmed plant looks better than a single stemmed plant at maturity. I would view it as a net loss, not a net gain, to have 3 single-stemmed plants instead of 1 triple-stemmed one.

Almamons, your plant is rocketing forward at this point. The most obvious evidence of that is the green color of the stem on the branches (a sure sign they are brand new) and the overall leafiness. Leaves have been retained almost all the way to the base of the plant.

Take a look at this general background page on the genus

The Pachypodiums Database

You can expect 2 seasons for the plant: a season of active growth usually from late spring through late summer, and a season of rest during late fall and winter. It is perfectly normal for a Pachypodium to lose all its leaves in winter when temperatures dip and light is low. That is a sign to back off on the watering until new leaves emerge perhaps weeks or months later. As a general rule, water more often when the plant is in leaf (for me, in our mild climate, that means twice a week) and less often when it starts to go leafless (maybe every 2-3 weeks when it has no leaves).

Use fast draining soil (like 50% pumice, perlite, or equivalent) and be sure the new container has a hole at the bottom. Provide as much light as possible if the plant will be indoors (like right by your sunniest window in Novi Sad).


Thank you for your answer, it helped me to understand the plant far better. I already made a mixture of soil that proved to be excellent with my other succulents. Also, it is placed near southern window at the house and I don't use tap water when watering. I use water from my aquariums. It would be a waste to throw it away with all the nutrients. Smiling

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almamons
Aug 13, 2020 12:54 AM CST
After two years and one repotting, we're doing well. I hope the torns on two smaller parts won't cause problems.
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