Roses forum: Good rebloomers

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Name: Mary Voss
Marshfield, Missouri (Zone 6a)
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MaryinLa
Apr 29, 2012 11:38 AM CST
We all know the Knockouts are good rebloomers, but what about others? I would like to hear what people consider their best rebloomers.

I will start with Lavender Simplicity. This rose bloomed it's head off for me last year, right up through winter and freezes, etc. No die back, and wasn't without flowers for very long.


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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
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porkpal
Apr 29, 2012 1:08 PM CST
My first thoughts are: Teasing Georgia, Red cascade, Europeana, Climbing Pinkie, Buff Beauty and Lafter. I'm sure I'm leaving out several,
Porkpal
Name: Cindi
Wichita, Kansas (Zone 7a)
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CindiKS
Apr 29, 2012 8:04 PM CST
Home Run, Pink Home Run, Rainbow Sorbet, Carefree Wonder, Cape Diamond, Fourth of July, Sophy's Rose. All absolutely non stop bloomers. and I'll second all that Porkpal listed except Lafter, because I don't have that one. Need to look into that!
I know there's more...
Remember that children, marriages, and flower gardens reflect the kind of care they get.
H. Jackson Brown, Jr.
Name: Toni
Denver Metro (Zone 5a)
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.
Charter ATP Member Irises Salvias Xeriscape Birds I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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Skiekitty
Apr 29, 2012 8:14 PM CST
Golden Masterpiece, Mardi Gras, Blue Girl, Europeana, Ruby Ruby, Mr. Lincoln, Blue Bayou, Heirloom, Sunsprite, Sonja, Shockwave, Pure Perfume.. those are the ones off the top of my head that I can think of that bloomed for me constantly all season last year.
Roses are one of my passions! Just opened, my Etsy shop (to fund my rose hobby)! http://www.etsy.com/shop/TweetsnTreats
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
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Steve812
May 4, 2012 5:13 PM CST
In my garden the difference between roses that bloom once per year and roses that are said to repeat has generally been that roses that bloom once go whole hog and produce a flurry of flowers in early summer whereas the repeat bloomers make one flower in the early summer, then they proceed to die. Amazingly this has never completely convinced me to give up trying to grow remontant roses. Occasionally a remontant rose will put on a good spring show for me. I've never had a good fall show from any rose. So this is an interesting topic to me.

Last year:
- La Ville Bruxelles bloomed once and had dozens of tiny neat flowers. Ditto Ipahan.
- Crocus rose put on a good show in spring, but skipped making roses in the fall.
- Falstaff, in its third year then made six roses in spring, none in fall.
- Abe Darby, also three years old and three feet in each direction was too busy making foliage all year to make more than a token bloom.
- Baronne Prevost bore a total of two flowers: one in spring and one in fall.
- Rainbow Sorbet was the star of the remontant roses in my garden with three in spring and two in fall. I was so impressed that this year I bought two more!
- Amatsu Otone, a hybrid tea rose, made one blossom. But it is still alive, miraculously.
- Nicole was purchased as a number one grafted rose and is starting her third season. Nicole has not reached six inches tall and has not yet bloomed. The fact that she is not dead testifies to the fact that in terms of health and durability she is in the top 20% of roses. And that she is a remontant rose.

Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
May 4, 2012 9:11 PM CST
Wow, Steve, I admire your persistence!
Porkpal
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
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Steve812
May 4, 2012 10:14 PM CST
I intend to do what is required to give the roses I've now planted a chance to establish. That will probably be a few more years. I imagine that some of the shy ones will be more productive after a good pruning, which I never do before a rose is at least three years old and growing well. Only Abe Darby would have qualified for that this spring. I'm guessing that Hermosa, Crocus Rose, Tess of the d'Ubervilles and perhaps one or two other roses will be at that point next spring. It took a while to really understand how to avoid losing roses to spring and fall frosts, so almost all of my roses are less than two full seasons old. If I get six years out and am still having years like last year the roses will get ripped out and more xeric plants will take their places.

When I grew many dozens of cultivars successfully in NJ I frequently had a glorious spring garden, but I remember never having more than a token blossom or two in the fall. Most of the remontant roses had been either permanently destroyed by blackspot, or set back too far to bloom. I'm sure they were under-watered and under-fertilized: even the iron-clad HT's like Midas Touch and Electron did not repeat. It was roses like City of York, Constance Spry, Rosa Mundi, and Great Maiden's Blush that did much of the heavy lifting in the garden year after year. A few DA roses pitched in generously during spring, too. Still, spring was glorious enough in the garden to warrant growing roses. To get back to the topic at hand, Knockout was a superlative performer for a number of years, though I'm not sure it repeated for me there, either.
Name: Cindi
Wichita, Kansas (Zone 7a)
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CindiKS
May 5, 2012 1:53 PM CST
Oh Steve I am so sorry. Is it the hot climate? Are your nights too cold? i saw beautiful roses growing in rocks in Las Vegas, so I thought for sure roses would grow anywhere.
Why do they struggle so?
Confused Crying
Remember that children, marriages, and flower gardens reflect the kind of care they get.
H. Jackson Brown, Jr.
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
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Steve812
May 5, 2012 2:54 PM CST
Perhaps I have just not been a very good rose gardener. Or perhaps I have not chosen the right roses for the location. Or the right location for growing roses. I'm sure it's a combination of many things. Until last year I consistently underestimated how much water roses need to do well. I also have used little fertilizer. Here in Prescott yo-yo weather has killed a lot of roses. It's only been during the last two years that I've had the knowledge to minimize its damage.

I've started to notice fattening buds on more and more of the plants that have been established for a few years. Right now I think there is a chance that some of my roses might not get deadheaded by deer before they bloom. That will be a great leap forward.

I remember long ago growing roses in Austin, TX. I believe maybe Sun Flare bloomed for much of the summer.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
May 5, 2012 5:35 PM CST
Maybe your roses really are trying to rebloom but the deer always beat them to it.

If success with roses were a matter of fertilizer, water and diligent care, I would have no blooms. It must be the predators and the climate that are almost defeating your plants.
Porkpal
Name: Cindi
Wichita, Kansas (Zone 7a)
Charter ATP Member Plant and/or Seed Trader Permaculture Roses Ponds Peonies
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CindiKS
May 5, 2012 6:36 PM CST
Steve, I just read your post on another thread about your extreme freeze thaw cycles.
Late freezes are my #1 killer of roses. I am certain that is what is happening to you. They break dormancy too early and then have no defense to the cold in those late freezes.
One year I lost 50 out of 52 roses. I was so depressed I sold that house. That was just the final sign that things weren't right.
Wasn't until a few years later that someone explained the effects of the freeze/thaw cycle to me.
Remember that children, marriages, and flower gardens reflect the kind of care they get.
H. Jackson Brown, Jr.
Name: Toni
Denver Metro (Zone 5a)
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.
Charter ATP Member Irises Salvias Xeriscape Birds I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Procrastinator The WITWIT Badge Region: Colorado Enjoys or suffers cold winters Cat Lover
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Skiekitty
May 5, 2012 9:09 PM CST
That's what always kills my roses.. the late freezes. I've learned that I have to be patient and to not uncover the roses. In fact, this spring, I saw leaves emerging on the roses above my mulch and so I piled even MORE mulch on them. I didn't do that with all the roses, and the ones I did are far stronger than the ones I didn't pile more mulch on. One rose I was EXTREMELY worried about, English Perfume (Rose (Rosa 'English Perfume')), as it was a VERY small own-root from RU, I made sure that it was completely and utterly BURIED in mulch. Right now it's about a foot tall with brand-new canes growing like a weed. I also moved my Dolly Parton from one section of my yard to about 15 feet away. I now know why she was never a strong rose. I completely and utterly planted her 100% wrong. I planted her like you plant a tree, with the union about an inch above the ground. It's only because of the mulch that she has survived for as long as she has!! I now have her about 3" below ground level and then buried her up to her eyeballs (well, almost to the top of the green cane that survived) in mulch. And another positive thing I've found, especially this year, is that everyone is SOOOO full of buds because of the soil. My soil here is crap. Crap Crap Crap. What's not extreme clay is sand. Bleh. No happy medium. But, since I've been using soooooo much mulch, the soil has been improved a gazillion-fold. There are literally hundreds of worms in every hole I've dug, the soil is pebbly & not compact.. I can't believe the difference it's made from the mulch breaking down & putting the nutrients back into the soil. That's why some of my roses, my older ones that I've mulched since day one, are huge & happy. Austrian Copper & Theresa Bugnet are in bloom right now and there are very very few roses that are not with buds. It's not because I fed generously last year.. I didn't. I was sorely neglectful of them last year. But, I feel that this year, they're in much better straits because of the soil being so much better due to the mulch!
Roses are one of my passions! Just opened, my Etsy shop (to fund my rose hobby)! http://www.etsy.com/shop/TweetsnTreats
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
May 5, 2012 10:23 PM CST
Toni I agree about the mulch. I don't need it for frost protection, but it has done wonders to improve my soil which is very sandy and will not hold moisture long. It is also the only source of added nutrients I provide the roses and they do okay.
Porkpal
Name: Cindi
Wichita, Kansas (Zone 7a)
Charter ATP Member Plant and/or Seed Trader Permaculture Roses Ponds Peonies
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CindiKS
May 6, 2012 12:39 PM CST
And I''ll agree with porkpal's agreement.
The mulch here is more for summer protection, to keep the soil from drying out, or from compaction from driving rains.
Cotton burr compost is something I add when I plant new roses. Sometimes it goes in the hole, but usually it's just top dressing. My soil is fabulous, but I add bags of manure or mushroom compost if it's a HT or something that's zone 7, like Dolly Parton. Every other year, I order an 18 ton load of 3 year old shredded compost. It's a mixture of alfalfa and horse poop, basically horse stall cleanings. This entrepreneur near me gets paid to clean out stalls from all the ritzy horse farms around here. He takes it and runs it through a big shredding machine and lets it sit for a minimum of 2 years, then shreds it again. My husband buys me the truckload for my birthday in June. So romantic. It takes me all year to use the whole pile. I won't get it this year because I'm asking for garden benches instead. i'll get several big truckloads of wood mulch, though. They are free and this year the tree companies will be glad to bring it to me because they are still cleaning up trees damaged by the tornado.
It's a shame to see people taking downed trees to the landfill when they could be shredded and used to improve soil. I have some weeds where I need mulch--better give the tree company a call tomorrow, don't know why they haven't been by here yet! I sure don't want to have to pay for mulch!
The mountain I had last year is gone.
Remember that children, marriages, and flower gardens reflect the kind of care they get.
H. Jackson Brown, Jr.
Name: Mary Voss
Marshfield, Missouri (Zone 6a)
Birds Butterflies Roses Irises Plant and/or Seed Trader
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MaryinLa
May 6, 2012 6:46 PM CST
Does anybody know if The Fairy Climber blooms as continuously as the shrub version? It is not rated as high on HMF for bloom frequency as the shrub version.

I want to get some new climbers, but I want real good rebloom, preferably without having to deadhead.
Name: Cindi
Wichita, Kansas (Zone 7a)
Charter ATP Member Plant and/or Seed Trader Permaculture Roses Ponds Peonies
Lilies Irises Daylilies Dog Lover Beekeeper Garden Ideas: Master Level
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CindiKS
May 6, 2012 7:06 PM CST
climbing Pinkie is a pretty good rebloomer. Radler put out a couple last year that I bought and they did bloom as advertised, but it was kind of a boring bloom. Autumn Sunset stays in bloom most of the summer, into fall. Dublin Bay isn't bad, Candyland is good too.
All of them are free from disease here. i have same temps as you but you're just a bit more humid. i have family in Marshfield and Mansfield!
Remember that children, marriages, and flower gardens reflect the kind of care they get.
H. Jackson Brown, Jr.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
May 6, 2012 8:46 PM CST
I have both The Fairy and the Climbing Fairy. I'd say they are about equally good at reblooming. The Climbing Fairy grew really fast for a climber too.
Porkpal
Name: Mary Voss
Marshfield, Missouri (Zone 6a)
Birds Butterflies Roses Irises Plant and/or Seed Trader
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MaryinLa
May 8, 2012 8:59 PM CST
Thanks
Name: Carey
Austin, TX (Zone 8b)
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careyana
May 9, 2012 12:16 PM CST
My favorite rebloomer is Caldwell Pink. Not only does it rebloom prolifically, it did so last summer during our 110 degree days in the middle of the second worst drought in recorded history.
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
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Steve812
May 9, 2012 4:47 PM CST
Caldwell Pink. I am agog with its ability to grow and prosper in totally worthless soil. And at the beauty of its red leaves in fall. And of what a nice even, densely branched shrub it makes. It has grown like mad this year and is in a pretty even contest with nepeta Walker's Low (Next spring the nepeta gets moved one foot away from the rose bed..) to see who can crowd out whom. Mine are just entering their second year and they only made a token number of blooms last year. But they were of such perfect form. If it were deliciously fragrant it would be a shoe-in to be my cnoice for the "if you could only have one rose" game. It has buds now. Looking forward to see if it will repeat this year.

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