Lilies forum→Tulip Color Breaking Virus?

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Name: Anthony Weeding
Rosetta,Tasmania,Australia (Zone 7b)
idont havemuch-but ihave everything
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Australia Lilies Seed Starter Bulbs
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gwhizz
Jul 3, 2012 3:05 AM CST
1-read a how to grow lilies from seed thread on ATP
2-all sorts
3-just send me best wishes
4-about 38 in late Jan-early Feb
Hilarious!
lily freaks are not geeks!
Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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pardalinum
Jul 3, 2012 7:39 PM CST

Moderator

Finally, a good example of mosaic virus, not to be confused with those nutrition problems.

Thumb of 2012-07-04/pardalinum/4b1391
Name: barb allison
Fate, Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Seller of Garden Stuff Region: Texas Sempervivums
mamajack
Jul 4, 2012 11:07 AM CST
great picture pardalinum. can't get much clearer than that.

gwhizz..........so you get to 100 degrees in jan/feb...........which is your summer, right? the reason i am asking is that if you have lilies that will bloom in that kind of heat then they ought to bloom in texas. orientals don't grow so hot here. but asiatics do just fine. and are these lilies native plants in your australia? i ALWAYS wanted to go to australia. to see the kangaroos MAN!!! AND all the other critters yall have.
Name: Evan
Pioneer Valley south, MA, USA (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member Aroids Irises I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Tropicals Vermiculture
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eclayne
Jul 5, 2012 5:41 PM CST

Plants Admin Emeritus

Is it appropriate to have a dedicated page in the DB for virus images and info.?
Evan
Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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pardalinum
Jul 5, 2012 5:50 PM CST

Moderator

I think this would be covered in the parent plant area. Virus is just one disease of many. For example, for parent plant iris there would be an area for disease information. I think they have this already but photos would be helpful (example, pictures of borer, leaf spot, bacterial soft rot etc).

Sounds like something that would be up to the moderators to do.
Name: Polly Kinsman
Hannibal, NY (Zone 6a)

Charter ATP Member Region: United States of America I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises Lilies
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PollyK
Jul 5, 2012 6:22 PM CST
I think so, yes, but in each section. I think a general one would be too overwhelming.

Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
Forum moderator Hybridizer Region: Pacific Northwest Lilies Sempervivums Sedums
Pollen collector I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier
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pardalinum
Jul 5, 2012 6:39 PM CST

Moderator

Yes, different plants have different diseases. And I suppose virus can show different symptoms across the genera.

I have a few other photos of lily virus on my hard drive.
Name: Evan
Pioneer Valley south, MA, USA (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member Aroids Irises I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Tropicals Vermiculture
Foliage Fan Bulbs Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Composter Plant Database Moderator
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eclayne
Jul 5, 2012 8:23 PM CST

Plants Admin Emeritus

I was talking specifically to Lily virus' but could apply to other problems/pests in other genus. Currently a typical Parent Plant page isn't a very good place to document something like these virus' as the related images would get lost. An article could be written with some pictures I suppose but I was thinking of a dedicated page with a set of images that would be added to and edited. Essentially what's contained in this thread in a parent plant format.
Evan
Name: barb allison
Fate, Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Seller of Garden Stuff Region: Texas Sempervivums
mamajack
Jul 8, 2012 10:03 AM CST
that sounds doable and useful.

i haven't looked at the lily database yall have here very much. but i did look at the daylily database and GIRLS AND BOYS...........yall did a great job.
Name: Michael Norberry
Arcata, CA Zone 9 or 17 suns (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Dog Lover Region: California Seed Starter Ponds
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mnorberry
Aug 11, 2012 2:31 PM CST
Question, If you find a lily that has or you think is virus, dig it up and what about the soil next to the bulb. Do you replace all soil in 12" or so with new?
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
I'm always on my way out the door..
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chelle
Aug 11, 2012 3:20 PM CST
Good question, Michael.

I didn't because I had healthy ones planted in the same clump. I'll be I'm all ears! for suggestions as well.
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Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
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Leftwood
Aug 11, 2012 5:23 PM CST
If all the live suspect material is gone, there would be no need to remove any soil. This would include any bulblets you may have missed, or broken scales from the bulb left in the soil that may produce new plants that would still be infected.

edited to add
There are some nematodes that live in the soil that can transmit virus. Zone 4, and maybe zone 5, areas need not worry as these nematodes do not survive the winters.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
[Last edited by Leftwood - Dec 30, 2018 12:51 PM (+)]
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Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
I'm always on my way out the door..
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Forum moderator Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Dog Lover Cottage Gardener
Native Plants and Wildflowers Plant Identifier Organic Gardener Keeps Horses Hummingbirder Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
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chelle
Aug 11, 2012 5:25 PM CST
Thank you, Rick.
Cottage Gardening

Newest Interest: Rock Gardens


Name: Anthony Weeding
Rosetta,Tasmania,Australia (Zone 7b)
idont havemuch-but ihave everything
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Australia Lilies Seed Starter Bulbs
Plant and/or Seed Trader Hellebores Birds Seller of Garden Stuff Garden Art Cat Lover
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gwhizz
Aug 12, 2012 5:09 AM CST
I think this is brilliant that ''many'' people are taking notice of all the ATP threads, and getting''the best''-and you have to be serious- this is the best advice you can get, from people who really know the product[lets not go the full hog and call them experts]- but extremely familiar with whats happening and why!!,.I absolutely appreciate popping in here each day, for a squizzy[look that one up Rick]..[aus slang]- and often i learn something new Thumbs up Anthony
lily freaks are not geeks!
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Aug 12, 2012 6:45 AM CST
Mike and Chelle: I second what Rick said 100%. Virus is a plant 'disease', not a soil 'disease'. I personally take the 'go slow approach' unless it's blatantly obvious, just to be more sure it isn't a symptom of something else, like environment, weather, nutrition, etc. And if the affected plant is in a pretty tight group, I wait until late, late fall to make sure all the stem roots of adjacent plants are dead. Then I'll go in and remove the plant in a clump with as much dirt intact as possible and try my darndest not to tear any stem bublets loose. I've been pretty fortunate in not having many viruses, especially this year with the hot dry weather and lack of insects--especially ants.

There are some older books written by Jan De Graaff that say viruses can live in the soil for two or three years but I don't think anyone subscribes to that thinking today. I don't!



Name: Anthony Weeding
Rosetta,Tasmania,Australia (Zone 7b)
idont havemuch-but ihave everything
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Australia Lilies Seed Starter Bulbs
Plant and/or Seed Trader Hellebores Birds Seller of Garden Stuff Garden Art Cat Lover
Image
gwhizz
Oct 2, 2012 4:36 AM CST
I have spent the last week pondering, what I thought was a foliage virus, both in seedlings and 5-6 yo pots,..,and came up with an answer.,Temperatures here have been up and down like a pr...itutes pants, 25 one day, 6 the next..rain on and off for 5 weeks.,,.spotted seedlings and shrivelled new growth.,I sat back and worked out from the pattern of problems,..,"I have over fertilised'-too much and too strong, unless it has been buried with the bulb during potting top laying fertiliser[npk mix] has caused a problem.. would love to hear of anyone else who may have experienced the same thing Shrug! -Anthony
lily freaks are not geeks!
Name: Polly Kinsman
Hannibal, NY (Zone 6a)

Charter ATP Member Region: United States of America I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises Lilies
Seller of Garden Stuff
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PollyK
Oct 2, 2012 6:27 AM CST
Never had, but Anthony you made me spit coffee this morning.
Lincoln, NE
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Miniature Gardening Butterflies
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Moby
Oct 2, 2012 6:42 AM CST
I agree
Where are we going, and why am I in this hand-basket?
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Oct 2, 2012 8:25 AM CST
I think Mother Nature threw you a curve ball, which when you get caught up in that situation, have no choice but to grow thru it. When we do everything right based on our knowledge, experience and the assumption that average weather will occur, things will turn out pretty good. But in the last two years, the usual 6 week weather cycles/periods have been extreme. The 'cool, moist' cycles have been more like 'cold, wet' and 'warm/dry' cycles have become more like 'hot/arrid' cycles. The transition time frame between cycles is very extreme. And this plays havoc with lilies because they can't adjust their growth rate quickly enough in response to those quick, drastic changes, one way or the other. They don't know whether to speed up or slow down is one way to put it (tho technically not correct) which I know from personnal experience causes irregular growth. Especially, if I fertilized with time release fertilizer a little late and then it's followed by a dryer than average late Summer/Fall season, followed by a cold/wet-hot/dry up and down Spring.

I'm notorious for 'pushing' it to the limits, And, up till a couple years ago, I got away with it , with only occasion distortion and fasciation. But I think I've seen enough recently to where I really cut back on the fertilizer. This past summer, I didn't fertilize at all because the hot, dry weather held on too long, in my judgement.

So, in your case, Anthony, it's not that you over fertilized, necessarily, but that Mother Nature didn't cooperate. That's my opinion. One good thing is that warmer weather is coming and your plants will grow out of it. But there is a good lesson here still, and that is that too little fertilizer is far better that too much fertilizer in any adverse environment.
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Oct 2, 2012 9:22 AM CST
Anthony--those spots, are they little white spots, purple spots or brown spots? Just thinking here without seeing pictures. Don't know if you've been spraying with copper base fungicide as a proactive measure for botrytis----but you have to be very conscious and careful when using copper based fungicides in cool damp weather because it can cause phytotoxicity (copper toxicity) wherever a small drop evaporates. It starts out as a tiny purple or whit/ tan spots that turn brown in a few days. Usually not life threatening, but certainly not something we like to see happen either.

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