Lilies forum→Tulip Color Breaking Virus?

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Name: Anthony Weeding
Rosetta,Tasmania,Australia (Zone 7b)
idont havemuch-but ihave everything
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Australia Lilies Seed Starter Bulbs
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gwhizz
Oct 2, 2012 9:33 PM CST
You are right on the money there Lorn, white spots[blotches] and little brown dots on the broadleaf seedlings..I hav'nt used a funguside for 2 years[as it resulted in what you described],.,.It is quite warm here now and we've had incredible winds for many days,.,Ive got buds on my Arabian reds, Pink giants ,and the ones we decided werent pink giant[Pearl Jessica]sort of thing.Everything is nosing up like crazy-Anthony Thumbs up
lily freaks are not geeks!
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Oct 3, 2012 5:31 AM CST
Those little baby seedlings seem especially sensitive to copper base fungicides, even at 20% recommended mix. Even insecticides can be harmful. A couple years ago, after weekend vacation, I returned to find that tiny little green leafhoppers by the dozens were in them. So, I grabbed a can of house and patio plant insecticide that my wife uses just to chase them out of there and very, very cautiously fogged the pots from a good distance even. It chased the leafhoppers out but I could tell the plants didn't care for it.

But, as far as usage on a mature bed of adult lilies, I spray full recommended strength in mid/late March right over the top of my winter mulch and then let the spring rains soak it in--that's well before any have emerged. I won't use it again until temperatures warm into the 70s and 80s and the plants are well on their way. But with growing plants too, I've seen spotting if I sprayed when the temps are in the 40s and 50s so I avoid proactive spraying then.
Name: Anthony Weeding
Rosetta,Tasmania,Australia (Zone 7b)
idont havemuch-but ihave everything
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Australia Lilies Seed Starter Bulbs
Plant and/or Seed Trader Hellebores Birds Seller of Garden Stuff Garden Art Cat Lover
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gwhizz
Oct 4, 2012 3:19 AM CST
Im listening I'm all ears!
lily freaks are not geeks!
Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Leftwood
Oct 8, 2013 9:08 AM CST
Viruses can be oh-so-beautiful....
http://www.srgc.net/forum/inde...

But even with this crocus, the world renown crocus expert, Jānis Rukšāns, recommends digging and burning.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Oct 8, 2013 6:27 PM CST
And crocus, too. Huh! I had a group of three Purple Prince that all showed symptoms their second year here. I replanted them at a remote garden in isolation for observation. I kept them for 4 or 5 years because my wife thought they were beautiful and I have to agree, Purple Prince looked good that way. But--this year, they had to go, pretty or not. Even though they were a good 300 feet away from my lily beds, the very thought of them being even that close bothered me at night.
Name: Anthony Weeding
Rosetta,Tasmania,Australia (Zone 7b)
idont havemuch-but ihave everything
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Australia Lilies Seed Starter Bulbs
Plant and/or Seed Trader Hellebores Birds Seller of Garden Stuff Garden Art Cat Lover
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gwhizz
Oct 9, 2013 2:22 AM CST
They aren't keen on 'the froth' of 'White King' bleach, either[long story] Thumbs down
lily freaks are not geeks!
Name: Peter
Europe (Zone 9a)
The only scarce resource is time
Dahlias Hybridizer Dog Lover Bee Lover Cottage Gardener Roses
Bulbs Seed Starter Lilies Irises Garden Ideas: Level 2
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Cantillon
Nov 11, 2013 10:56 AM CST
I have found that spraying lilies with any of the recommended bug killers results in the flowers being very damaged and the leaves sullen, hostile, and looking like they have been attacked by hippies tie dying them.

Now I don't spray, but just fret and try to grow them as well as possible. What fertilizes them?, I have yet to see bees do anything with them other than hide in them sometimes if it rains. Hoverflies are sometimes present, which I really like to see.

Any way here are a few Lilies from the garden. I have also moved them from full beds to mixed planting, for I think they are less vulnerable to all coming down with the same issues at the same time.


Thumb of 2013-11-11/Cantillon/15d2e9
Lilium Regale ( maybe golden regale)

Thumb of 2013-11-11/Cantillon/afa1fe
Lilium Golden Splendour

[Thumb of 2013-11-11/Cantillon/dd68f8
Lilium Black Beauty

Thumb of 2013-11-11/Cantillon/7eaa71
Lilium Black Beauty close up


Lilium African Queen
Lincoln, NE
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Miniature Gardening Butterflies
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Moby
Nov 12, 2013 7:10 AM CST
Hi Peter Welcome! Beautiful lilies!
Where are we going, and why am I in this hand-basket?
Name: Polly Kinsman
Hannibal, NY (Zone 6a)

Charter ATP Member Region: United States of America I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises Lilies
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PollyK
Nov 17, 2013 9:09 AM CST
Peter, welcome! Beautiful lilies and a beautiful setting.
Name: Peter
Europe (Zone 9a)
The only scarce resource is time
Dahlias Hybridizer Dog Lover Bee Lover Cottage Gardener Roses
Bulbs Seed Starter Lilies Irises Garden Ideas: Level 2
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Cantillon
Nov 20, 2013 3:33 PM CST

Hi Lilyfolk,

Thanks for the welcome,

Peter
Name: Jo Ann Gentle
Pittsford NY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cat Lover Heucheras Hellebores Container Gardener
Birds Region: New York Irises Garden Ideas: Master Level Avid Green Pages Reviewer Lilies
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ge1836
Dec 15, 2013 3:55 AM CST
I confess to not reading this entire thread but want to know if it is possible to plant new lilies where virused lilies have been removed.?
Its early in the morning and I was looking at threads and came across this one.
I had a scare last summer.My Robinas were believed to have TBV so I dug them. Awhile later there was an opinion that heat stress produced the same symptoms so I replanted the bulbs and will wait to see how they behave this year.
After reading about TBV online I believe I have a virus elsewhere as I noticed a variety starting to bloom but buds were contorted .

EDITING
It's half an hour later so I have been reading this post from the beginning.My question was answered by Lorne when he said viruses are a plant diseas not a soil disease.
I have so little room left and the supposedly diseased lilies are in such good places I was reluctant to leave a bare spot when removing virused ones.
[Last edited by ge1836 - Dec 15, 2013 4:36 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #526231 (11)
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Dec 15, 2013 7:17 AM CST
And Rick was the one that taught and convinced me of that!
Name: Jo Ann Gentle
Pittsford NY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cat Lover Heucheras Hellebores Container Gardener
Birds Region: New York Irises Garden Ideas: Master Level Avid Green Pages Reviewer Lilies
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ge1836
Dec 15, 2013 3:15 PM CST
It will just about kill me to dig the Robinas.June will be the telling time.
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Dec 15, 2013 7:49 PM CST
I never have been one to panic when I see something a little 'different' in appearance one year, especially in the flower and even more especially, if it is pink. I make a note of it and see if the plant has the same suspicious appearance the following year and if it still does, then I pull it. Usually, in the case of TBV or Tulip Breaking Virus it will show it's signs early in the foliage as streaks in the leaves so watch for that. If it turns out that you have to pull an infected plant, you can plant another in the same spot immediately, but you should be very careful to remove all remnants of the old plant and any little bulblets because the little bulblets would be virused too. And then, don't worry about the other remaining lilies too much; most all new hybrids are bred to be quite virus tolerant.

Of course, there are those who are ultra cautious and prefer to move the suspected plant immediately to another location. There's nothing wrong with being extra cautious either. Moving them right during blooming time can be done very successfully. Move as a whole plant, remove the flower head but leave all the stem and foliage.
Lincoln, NE
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Miniature Gardening Butterflies
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Moby
Dec 15, 2013 10:59 PM CST
Why remove the flowers?
Where are we going, and why am I in this hand-basket?
Name: Zhirair Basmajyan
Vanadzor, ARMENIA
Never say never
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Boyed
Dec 16, 2013 2:08 AM CST
ge1836 said:I confess to not reading this entire thread but want to know if it is possible to plant new lilies where virused lilies have been removed.?


Your question has been answered, so I just wanted give some further info, hoping it could be helpful. As it has been sad, virus doesn't function in the soil, it develops only in a sap. So, it is possible to plant a new one instead of the old virused one. But you should wait a bit until the remnants of the old plant (particle of the cut roots decay), because if the halthy bulb gets in contact with the damaged particles of the virused plant and it can catch virus.

I don't recomment to destroy the infected plants by digging, because in this case the infected sap goes into the digger and your hand, after that into your personal things, and virus is active for 4-5 days. In this case you should desinfect your working instruments. It is far better to apply aroundup into virused plant, cut it around 15-20 cm above soil level and put on a plastic bottle on it for isolation. The whole plant dies during 2 weeks.
Zhirair, Tulip collector, bulb enthusiast
http://vintagetulips.narod.ru/
Name: Jo Ann Gentle
Pittsford NY (Zone 6a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cat Lover Heucheras Hellebores Container Gardener
Birds Region: New York Irises Garden Ideas: Master Level Avid Green Pages Reviewer Lilies
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ge1836
Dec 16, 2013 4:22 AM CST
Thanks everyone for most helpful advise.
Name: Lorn (Roosterlorn)
S.E Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Lilies Seed Starter Pollen collector Bee Lover Region: Wisconsin
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Roosterlorn
Dec 16, 2013 9:04 AM CST
The next time I have an obviously virused plant, I'm going to try Zhirair's method with Round Up. And, especially if I'm working in a tight grouping of lilies. I remember the a situation I had back in 2010 or 2011 where I had a virused Maywood right in the middle of a tight grouping of several Rabinas and Visa-Versas and Maywoods. see photos. I removed that one immediately with a spade (because I didn't trust Round up back then). But it was a very difficult, undertaking without damaging the roots of the others. I was lucky. Knowing what I know now, I would have used Round Up in that situation.

Look at flower in upper right corner.

Thumb of 2013-12-16/Roosterlorn/918156 Next photo shows just how tight the group was--never a good idea to plant this tight. Only I would do something like that Rolling on the floor laughing One way to keep the weeds down. Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing


Thumb of 2013-12-16/Roosterlorn/c9db91

Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Hybridizer
Seed Starter Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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Leftwood
Dec 16, 2013 10:05 AM CST
With lilies, or anything with large bio mass organs (like a bulb), it is common to need to apply a second application of Round up. In the first application, the product is taken in and distributed throughout the plant. When there is a large biomass, the concentration of RU may become so diluted that the plant will not be killed, merely damaged. If this is the case, you will know, as the plant will seem to return to normal green in 2 weeks or so. This will be your cue for the second application.
When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the losers. - Socrates
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Tomato Heads Dahlias Houseplants Garden Ideas: Level 1 Photo Contest Winner: 2014
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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pirl
Dec 16, 2013 10:40 AM CST
That's exactly what happened when I sprayed a ditch daylily last year. It took at least two applications of Ortho's Poison Ivy Killer to eliminate it.

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