Irises forum: Transplanting Iris

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Name: Karen Kidd
Fish Creek Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
karengardens
Oct 22, 2018 7:40 AM CST
I just started digging up and dividing Iris, and was interrupted by other commitments that kept me out of the garden.
Problem is we are having unseasonably cold weather here on our Door County Peninsula with hard frosts.
Can I still plant the rhizomes or should I store them and hold off till Spring? Best method for storing suggestions?
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Oct 22, 2018 3:26 PM CST
Hmmm...
What kind of iris?

I'm going to figure bearded.
While you probably could store them like potatoes, I would plant them.
Still plenty of time for root growth before the ground freezes...

Next time, try moving them in August... October in the deep south.
[Last edited by stone - Oct 22, 2018 3:28 PM (+)]
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Name: daphne
san diego county, ca (Zone 10a)
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shizen
Oct 22, 2018 5:01 PM CST
Welcome! karen

in this forum @karengardens, look at the thread "what to do with this box..." by kimmer. there have been quite a few replies to the same query that you have. hope this helps.
Name: Evelyn
Northern CA Sierra foothills - (Zone 8a)
Region: United States of America Region: California Annuals Bulbs Butterflies Cat Lover
Foliage Fan Irises Organic Gardener Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
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evelyninthegarden
Oct 22, 2018 8:13 PM CST
Welcome! Karen! Hurray!

“It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold, when it is summer in the light and winter in the shade.” ~Charles Dickens
Name: Evelyn
Northern CA Sierra foothills - (Zone 8a)
Region: United States of America Region: California Annuals Bulbs Butterflies Cat Lover
Foliage Fan Irises Organic Gardener Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
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evelyninthegarden
Oct 22, 2018 8:14 PM CST
shizen said: Welcome! karen

in this forum @karengardens, look at the thread "what to do with this box..." by kimmer. there have been quite a few replies to the same query that you have. hope this helps.


Karen I agree

“It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold, when it is summer in the light and winter in the shade.” ~Charles Dickens
Name: Arlyn
Whiteside County, Illinois (Zone 5a)
Irises Beekeeper Region: Illinois Celebrating Gardening: 2015
crowrita1
Oct 23, 2018 5:14 AM CST
Welcome!
Name: Monty Riggles
Henry County, Virginia (Zone 7a)
Oops. The weeds took over!
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UndyingLight
Oct 23, 2018 2:08 PM CST
Welcome, Karen! Welcome!

I have just finished transplanting irises and I may still have another box coming in. Assuming I got everything ready in two days, it'd be almost November before that iris box arrived! Hilarious!
I've planted irises (bearded) as late as late October (Might have been November, but I can't remember) and planted as early as January, and both occasions, the transplanted irises did well.

I am not experienced, but I am guessing you are roughly around zone 5b, so if you decide to plant your irises, I suggest you do that quickly before any really hard freezes come around. Hopefully, your transplants, if you decide to plant them or store them, do well once they're in the ground. Thumbs up
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Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
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tveguy3
Oct 24, 2018 12:51 PM CST
I have planted irises this late in the past, and they all lived, but didn't bloom the next year, of course. If you decide to plant them this late, be sure to put a brick on the rhizome or a bent wire to hold them in the ground, otherwise they may heave out of the ground over winter. Good luck, and Welcome!
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Name: Evelyn
Northern CA Sierra foothills - (Zone 8a)
Region: United States of America Region: California Annuals Bulbs Butterflies Cat Lover
Foliage Fan Irises Organic Gardener Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
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evelyninthegarden
Oct 24, 2018 1:42 PM CST
Karen ~ If it is too cold or too wet to plant outside, you can always pot them up and put them in a sheltered space. A garage, shed, or outside covered with branches...then when it warms up in spring, they can be planted, after the frost leaves.

“It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold, when it is summer in the light and winter in the shade.” ~Charles Dickens
Name: Karen Kidd
Fish Creek Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
karengardens
Oct 24, 2018 1:58 PM CST
Some good advice. Thank you all for posting. I especially like the idea of holding the rhizomes down from heaving. I have earth stables and I think they should do the trick.

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