Cactus and Succulents forum: Identification help and is it a lost cause?

Page 1 of 2 • 1 2
Views: 887, Replies: 25 » Jump to the end
Name: Erica
Ohio (Zone 6a)
Houseplants
Image
OpieDoodle
Oct 28, 2018 8:23 AM CST
So I am a big sucker for clearance plants and I got a few succulents from lowes on the clearance rack yesterday (most were $0.50 each!). The small ones all look fine and I don't think I'll have a problem with. This one however looks like it may be struggling and upon further inspection it looks like something may have taken some nibbles out of the stem.

It was labeled as "Flap Jacks" (Kalanchoe Luciae). Is this the correct identification for this plant?

So far I have not repotted it as I wanted to get advice on what the best steps are to rescue it. The soil is super wet and compacted and it was on the bottom shelf of a cart towards the back so I doubt it was getting a lot of light.

Thumb of 2018-10-28/OpieDoodle/eb0947
Thumb of 2018-10-28/OpieDoodle/d15282
Thumb of 2018-10-28/OpieDoodle/d063f2
Thumb of 2018-10-28/OpieDoodle/73c437

Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Image
skopjecollection
Oct 28, 2018 8:33 AM CST
Amputate about half to an inch above the rot, remove lower leaves, let callous, and place in fresh soil, and water less....
Name: Erica
Ohio (Zone 6a)
Houseplants
Image
OpieDoodle
Oct 28, 2018 8:37 AM CST
skopjecollection said:Amputate about half to an inch above the rot, remove lower leaves, let callous, and place in fresh soil, and water less....


Oh my goodness, so basically make it a naked nub? That won't kill it?

Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Image
skopjecollection
Oct 28, 2018 8:47 AM CST
Just remove the lowermost 3-4 pair of leaves....
Ive had succulents survive far worse...
At least you saw this in time...
Name: Erica
Ohio (Zone 6a)
Houseplants
Image
OpieDoodle
Oct 28, 2018 9:00 AM CST
Oh okay I completely had read that wrong the first time! I am glad I clarified!
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
Image
needrain
Oct 28, 2018 9:00 AM CST
If you want some visuals for propagating, you can search YouTube for 'Flapjack Plant', 'Paddle Plant' and find some videos. They can be started using only a leaf, so you might want to take a healthy leaf and try one that way. I've only done it with offsets and tiny little plantlets or whatever they would be called that formed on the bloom stalk when mine bloomed. Those little things all made little plants that I gave away, but they started without any roots. It seemed and seems a plant eager to re-establish itself vegetatively. Some of these started out tiny and they still turned into plants.
Thumb of 2018-10-28/needrain/7c7895

This was the source. I had cut off and disposed of the upper half of the stalk before I decided to try the little growths.
Thumb of 2018-10-28/needrain/aaa5dd

Donald
Name: Erica
Ohio (Zone 6a)
Houseplants
Image
OpieDoodle
Oct 28, 2018 9:01 AM CST
That's a great idea to try to propagate it as well! Might as well make an attempt rather than tossing all the extra leaves I cut off
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
Image
needrain
Oct 28, 2018 9:06 AM CST
Just let them dry a bit first. I've found this plant to have low water requirements. I suspect unless where the leaf is detached has thoroughly dried at the attachment point, it may develop rot. I set the little plantlets in a dish on a very warm porch for 3-4 weeks before they got pushed in the soil medium. After that they survived some neglect and abuse on my part and still were happy to grow.
Donald
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Image
skopjecollection
Oct 28, 2018 9:08 AM CST
Low...but not as low as some...mine tends to end up dehydrated often....
[Last edited by skopjecollection - Oct 28, 2018 9:13 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1844936 (9)
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
Image
needrain
Oct 28, 2018 9:35 AM CST
skopjecollection said:Low...but not as low as some...mine tends to end up dehydrated often....


Yes. That is correct. Under my conditions and carelessness I have let it go too long without water and ended up losing some lower leaves. It always recovers nicely, but if I don't manage to pay more attention there will be more stalk than would be my preference.

On the other hand, my Kalanchoe tomatosa 'Chocolate Soldier' only gets water when it rains. Sadly some of the leaves that had naturally fallen and formed little plants sometimes don't survive that lack of water, but when I first was growing it I killed it with too much water, so I just quit several years ago. I probably should try and rescue those small plants and put them in a separate container and hope I could re-home them at some point. I worry about the K. tomatosa if we get a period of rain that lingers for a few days, but it seems to manage rainfall better than supplemental water. Nearly all my plants do.

There just isn't a one size fits all when it comes to plants, even when they are similar.
Donald
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Image
skopjecollection
Oct 28, 2018 10:14 AM CST
...Ive not lost a lot of plants there recently...there was this problematic sinocrassula and and that one aloe....but weekly and biweekly watering satisfies most of them.....
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
Image
needrain
Oct 28, 2018 11:19 AM CST
skopjecollection said:...Ive not lost a lot of plants there recently...there was this problematic sinocrassula and and that one aloe....but weekly and biweekly watering satisfies most of them.....


I don't have ANY plants that qualify for the 'Cactus and Tender Succulents' forum that receive supplemental water that frequently. Less is certainly more when it comes to giving those types of plants water. I have tropical type plants that are happy with it once - or even twice - daily. Not in this category, though. Over time, they have to teach me they benefit from more. If they sit there looking well and healthy, I leave them alone. During the warm months all my plants of any type are outside. Natural rain and humidity are beyond my control. There some plants that manage well no matter what I do. With the plants this forum covers, most of my really bad experiences have been too much water or thinking they had more resistance to frost and it proved otherwise. Here I've found when the natural temps outside get above 100F, it's better to let them suffer. I've killed more than one providing water when those conditions are present, even if I was careful to give that water in the hours with lower temps. It seems to be different for other people. Anything that comes with the description 'Alpine' is a risk.
Donald
Name: Stefan
SE europe(balkans) (Zone 6b)
Image
skopjecollection
Oct 28, 2018 11:24 AM CST
Its how and how much you water important too..
I dont soak my plants,(like people often suggest) i just give em a sip or two and thats usually enough, just moistening the soil a bit...Ive not lost a plant to wet rot in a long while...
Bugs, not so much....
Humidity and wateing.... maybe one or two...
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Oct 28, 2018 11:42 AM CST

Moderator

This back and forth sort of reminds me that any fixed watering interval, like every week or whatever, might work well for someone and terribly for someone else... I water my succulents (the ones bigger than small seedlings) once a week year round, with a few exceptions. But I would not recommend that care to anyone who didn't have a climate as mild as ours. If your daytime highs are in the 60s and 70sF for 10 or 11 months of the year, go for it. Otherwise, a better goal or target for the original poster would be whatever time interval is required for the soil to go dry, not much more and not much less. With the caveat that Donald mentioned that watering when it's super hot (or cold) tends to be risky for some plants.

Erica's plant will do well with a cycle of properly wet soil (saturated, until water comes out the holes in the bottom) and properly dry soil (maybe not bone dry but close to it). There is no advantage to watering short of completion, except maybe when temps are very high or very low. There is no advantage to watering before the soil is mostly dry (in fact there is an increased risk of rot, especially with low light and low temps). There is no advantage to leaving the soil bone dry for any extended period. Within those guidelines, and given strong light and mild temperatures, your plant will thrive. The actual amount of time required for the soil to dry out will depend on environmental conditions that vary over the course of a year, like light, temperature, and air flow.

As for repotting, maybe reconsider repotting at this time. In your climate, with the plant indoors for the winter, it's probably not going to need a lot more space. And with a bigger pot where the roots have not yet tapped the bottom, you have a bigger risk of the soil staying wet down there and causing rot complications. I'd say wait until the spring to move the plant up a size. And at that time look for a pot that's wider than tall, not much more than an inch or two wider than the current one. These plants will fill a 3-5 gallon pot when they reach full (flowering) size but they do better with a pot that matches the size of the roots along the way.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Oct 28, 2018 11:56 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1845004 (14)
Name: Erica
Ohio (Zone 6a)
Houseplants
Image
OpieDoodle
Oct 28, 2018 12:03 PM CST
I was more considering repotting just to get it in a better soil rather than because it needed a bigger pot. Like I bought it yesterday probably about noon and my house is really dry from having the heat on (thanks ohio weather), and the soil is still drenched. It looks like moss has been growing on it as well. So I was more considering the repot as a way to improve the soil and I generally keep my succulents in terra cotta to help with drainage as well

I am just not wanting to do too much but I also don't want to do too little.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Oct 28, 2018 12:09 PM CST

Moderator

I hear you. When you do replace the soil (which would be a bigger intervention than just moving the plant up a size) be sure not to water right afterwards. Wait a week or two (more time for more damage to the roots). In the weeks after soil replacement, be sure to allow plenty of time for the soil to dry out in between watering. An unglazed clay pot will definitely help with that.
Name: Erica
Ohio (Zone 6a)
Houseplants
Image
OpieDoodle
Oct 28, 2018 12:31 PM CST
Baja_Costero said:I hear you. When you do replace the soil (which would be a bigger intervention than just moving the plant up a size) be sure not to water right afterwards. Wait a week or two (more time for more damage to the roots). In the weeks after soil replacement, be sure to allow plenty of time for the soil to dry out in between watering. An unglazed clay pot will definitely help with that.


Yeah I have a couple plain ole terra cotta pots I was considering. I just worry that big of a change would kill it since its clearly already struggling. I feel like its a double edge sword here, do I leave it as is to avoid the stress but the crappy soil its in could have negative impacts or do I just go all in and change the soil out as much as I can to improve quality and drainage?

What would be your course of action if this were your plant?

Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Oct 28, 2018 12:54 PM CST

Moderator

Maybe gently remove the excess soil around the edges of the rootball, without completely bare-rooting the plant. Shake it a little, see what falls off, massage around the edges, but don't remove all the soil. Get rid of what you can while trying not to manhandle the roots more than possible. Try to use a pot that's not a whole lot larger than the rootball (for now). And in the future try to perform this type of maintenance in the spring, so that the plant will have the bright/warm months to recover and grow.

If you've got the heat going during winter and it's warm and dry inside, keep an eye on the plants in unglazed terra cotta pots, which will dry out really fast under those conditions.
Name: Erica
Ohio (Zone 6a)
Houseplants
Image
OpieDoodle
Oct 28, 2018 7:09 PM CST
Baja_Costero said:Maybe gently remove the excess soil around the edges of the rootball, without completely bare-rooting the plant. Shake it a little, see what falls off, massage around the edges, but don't remove all the soil. Get rid of what you can while trying not to manhandle the roots more than possible. Try to use a pot that's not a whole lot larger than the rootball (for now). And in the future try to perform this type of maintenance in the spring, so that the plant will have the bright/warm months to recover and grow.

If you've got the heat going during winter and it's warm and dry inside, keep an eye on the plants in unglazed terra cotta pots, which will dry out really fast under those conditions.


Thanks! I have been watching all of them as I really like terra cotta Lovey dubby I may start running a humidifier as well. I always get really bad bloody noses in the winter thanks to how dry it gets so not only would it help the plants but it may help me too. Dual purpose means the husband can't say no!

Its still super wet today so hopefully tomorrow I can repot it. Would you behead it as others have mentioned? I've gotten that advice from quite a few people now but my anxiety doesn't want to let me do it!

Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Oct 28, 2018 7:11 PM CST

Moderator

Only if the stem is clearly soft, discolored, and rotten at the base (which I am not convinced is the case).

Now if you want to make more of it and see beheading as a way to force branches, then that's a fine way to go, but this is not the right time of year to do it.

Page 1 of 2 • 1 2

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Cactus and Succulents forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by Whitebeard and is called "Yucca with gaillardia, a happy group"

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.