Roses forum: Hardy David Austin Roses

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Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan (Zone 5b)

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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frankrichards16
Nov 15, 2018 6:51 PM CST
I have grown David Austin roses in the past, they are all gone now. I really did like them...

I have researched and found that several of his roses might survive better in my usda zone of 5. Here is what I came up with:

Rosa 'Ausbord' GERTRUDE JEKYLL ®™, Rosa 'Auscrystal' James Galway®™, Rosa 'Ausdrawn' THE GENEROUS GARDENER ®™, Rosa 'Aushouse' HARLOW CARR ®™, Rosa 'Ausland' Scepter'd Isle ®™, Rosa 'Ausled' A SHROPSHIRE LAD ®™, Rosa 'Ausquirk' SUSAN WILLIAMS-ELLIS®™, Rosa 'Austilly' THE MAYFLOWER®™, Rosa 'Auswinter' CROWN PRINCESS MARGARETA®™

Any recommendations on a good source? Bare root, potted, when???

Any additional David Austin roses that I should consider?



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JHeirloomSeeds
Nov 15, 2018 8:11 PM CST
I'm not a rose expert by any means, but I do love the David Austin roses. I planted the "Crocus Rose" a couple of years ago but it didn't survive last winter. When I bought it, it was said to be hardy to zone 4, but the next year's catalog said zone 5! Shrug!
The official US David Austin site has a page just of roses hardy to zones 4 and 5:
http://www.davidaustinroses.co...
My blog: https://yeflowerlovers.blogspo...
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Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan (Zone 5b)

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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frankrichards16
Nov 16, 2018 12:19 PM CST
Davidaustin.com roses offers bare root and 2 quart pots. Anyone have an opinion?

where do they ship from?
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
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vaporvac
Nov 16, 2018 1:34 PM CST
I've gotten great bare-roots directly from DA, but some are virused apparently. Palentine in Canada is supposed to have wonderful plants grafted on Multiflora rootstock instead of Dr. Huey, which probably does really well in MI. They have huge rootstock. I'll look up other roses in P. Scneider's book, 'Right Rose, Right Place'. All his recommendations are at least root hardy to zone 5. It's a wonderful book if you don't already have it. Perhaps your library carries it.
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
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zuzu
Nov 16, 2018 1:49 PM CST

Moderator

Palatine stopped selling Austin roses a few years ago, so it isn't an option in this case. Regan nursery resells Austins that it receives from David Austin Roses in Texas, and its prices were once lower than the Texas nursery's because its markup wasn't as high. I'm not sure that's still the case. A few years ago I read that all but a few of the Austin roses are hardy at least to zone 5 and some are even hardy to zone 4. The few that are hardy only to zone 6 are Dove, Jubilee Celebration, and The Endeavour.
Northern MO (Zone 6a)
ac91z6
Nov 16, 2018 4:50 PM CST
Hortico has some Austins available, and they are grafted onto Multiflora. I got 'The Wedgewood Rose' from them just this year, so I cant' tell you much about it. Are you 5a or 5b? I think that half-zone of difference really makes or breaks a rose's survival, once you get past z7. How much snow cover do you usually get? That makes a difference too.
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan (Zone 5b)

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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frankrichards16
Nov 16, 2018 5:05 PM CST
@ac91z6

I am in 5b, however I am rural and it seems like I get higher winds or something.

So, I usually try to buy plants that survive zone 4.

Most plants that I buy that are rated at zone 5 do not survive.
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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zuzu
Nov 16, 2018 5:18 PM CST

Moderator

Here are the Austins in our database that are hardy to zone 4:

https://tinyurl.com/yb2hx8yk
SW Ohio River Valley (Zone 6b)
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vaporvac
Nov 16, 2018 7:02 PM CST
I think I was confusing Palatine with Hortico. One of them (it must be Hortico) just had a lot of rare and old Austin budwood sent to them, so there will be even more available in the future. I've never ordered from either.
Northern MO (Zone 6a)
ac91z6
Nov 16, 2018 7:07 PM CST
I'm just a cold z6a (20 minutes from 5b) so I can't help much with z4 rated roses. I know we've got a few that grow roses in that zones, or microclimates that get that cold, so hopefully they'll see that and chime in @frankrichards16

The only thing I really feel I can say with any certainty is you probably want grafted roses - the grafts will give them a boost before winter hits, so they'll be more likely to survive. And bury the grafts, but I'm sure you already know that. Hilarious!
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan (Zone 5b)

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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frankrichards16
Nov 16, 2018 7:11 PM CST
@ac91z6

I always thought that own root roses would be better?
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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zuzu
Nov 16, 2018 7:18 PM CST

Moderator

In your zone they might be better, Frank. Many roses are grafted onto Dr. Huey, which is hardy only to zone 6.
Name: Amanda
KC metro area, Missouri (Zone 6a)
Roses Zinnias Region: Missouri Cat Lover Dog Lover Bookworm
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pepper23
Nov 16, 2018 7:53 PM CST
I prefer own root myself here. I'm down in a holler and am 5b/6a but it can get brutal during winter and most roses I've bought grafted always died to the graft and I had to mess with getting rid of the root stock. I still have one Dr. Huey left and I can't kill it since it's entwined with a clematis. Sighing!

I had a Graham Thomas but it never took off and died on me this past winter so I can't speak on David Austin yet. But once we have a good list to go off of I might try one again if it's hardy enough.
Name: Shyam
San Francisco, CA (Zone 10b)
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Rose_Guy1127
Nov 17, 2018 12:13 AM CST
Frank,

In my experience, the roses from DA have performed well so far, both in the ground and in containers. However, they are all hardy against mildew and rust to a certain limit. For instance, in SF weather, growing roses is a challenge, and DA roses are no exception. I spray my roses every two weeks to keep them free of diseases.

The following DA link has roses suitable for zone 5:

https://www.davidaustinroses.c...

If you look to the left side of the webpage you have a list of filter options that you could use to sort roses that fits your preference such as rose type, color, height, fragrance, disease resistance, specific situation, challenging location, etc. In regards to own root and bare-root, it's merely a personal choice for I have roses of own root and bare-root that are growing and blooming well. Own root takes a while to get established, unlike bare-root. And DA only ships roses during the planting season suitable to your planting zone thereby ensuring the survival of the rose once planted. Clicking on a rose in the website will direct you to the product page where it will indicate if the particular rose is available in a 2-quart pot or as bare-root. Hope this helps.

Zone 9, Sunset Zone 9 (Zone 9b)
Roses
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Mustbnuts
Nov 17, 2018 8:49 AM CST
I am not in your zone so I have no experience growing roses there, however, I have received DA own root roses in the past from DA in Texas and they were all extremely healthy and very big when I got them.
Northern MO (Zone 6a)
ac91z6
Nov 17, 2018 11:04 AM CST
Ok, the website just ate my reply! Grumbling But the gist of it - If a rose is hardy enough, and big enough to start with, own-root is fine. Some may need the graft for that extra 'oomph' to get through that first growing season. Besides those @zuzu listed, HelpMeFind has 'Princess Alexandra of Kent' listed as hardy to z4b! Someone growing it specifically said -30 degrees in a caption on a photo from their garden. I don't know how big it would get in zones that cold, or what (if any) winter protection they use. That site also listed 'Gentle Hermione' and 'St. Cecilia', which our database put in z5.
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan (Zone 5b)

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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frankrichards16
Nov 17, 2018 3:26 PM CST
did a web chat with David Austin roses.

Their bare root plants are 2 years old, while the potted cuttings are 8 months. Both are own root.

they are in Tyler TX. Their roses are grown in California and Arizona.

they ship bare root to MI 49236 in April. Potted in late May.

I was impressed with quality of my chat! I believe her name was Jody (not sure)

Also, I noted on the website that they have a 5 year guarantee!

Most of the roses I have been looking at are priced at $28.50. Shipping was $25 for orders over $100

Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
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seilMI
Nov 17, 2018 6:07 PM CST
Hi, I'm new here but I'm in SE MI on Lake St. Clair (zone 6). The lake affects my weather a great deal.
Fall is warmer until the lake cools down but springs are much cooler until the lake thaws and begins to warm. I've bought several DA roses from their US site over the years. I've had Golden Celebration for going on 30 years and Graham Thomas for about 15 years. Both are very good winter survivors for me. A lot of years they are green to the tips come spring. Even in the worst winters they do very well. Two years ago I bought Queen of Sweden and Jubilee Celebration as bare roots and so far, although they are still small plants compared to the other two, they've both been good winter survivors too.

As for whether bare root or potted are better, the choice is yours. The bare roots are two year old plants so you're starting out ahead on the growth scale. The potted rooted cuttings will be very small and will take time to grow into a bush of any size. Since they are both own root plants I go for the bigger plant immediately because the season here is short and I don't feel the small rooted cuttings have enough time to establish enough root ball to withstand a Michigan winter that first year.

When you're buying own root plants it doesn't matter as much if you bury the knot. There is no graft to protect like you'd have on a budded rose.
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan (Zone 5b)

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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frankrichards16
Nov 19, 2018 9:02 AM CST
I do have one English rose, Austin's first.

Rosa 'Constance Spry', Common Name: Climbing Rose, Size: 10ft., Pink, Breeder: (Austin), USDA Hardiness Zone 5, Michigan Bloom Month 6b

Introduced by Shropshire farmer David Austin in 1961. Planted this on the west slope several years (~20) ago. Spring cleaning in 2013 revealed a healthy rose, it still had a tag. It was surrounded by several large shrubs which I removed this year. I am interested to see how it will do now that it is exposed.

Name: John
Helensville, New Zealand
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S124AB
Nov 21, 2018 3:00 AM CST
Constance Spry was bred from a Gallica (Belle Isis- 1845) and a Floribunda (Dainty Maid) 1940.

The old rose parentage and the original habitat being most of Europe, and east towards Russia and Turkey tell me it's likely to be tolerant of the cold and a hardy rose.

I have had C.S. for 25 plus years, and do very little to it, apart from thin a few dead canes out.
As it spreads by sending up small shoots like a rush plant , mine now covers 1-2 square yards in size.

It's never got to 10 ft tall, 5-6 at most, although I do train some canes onto a wire that runs along a fence.

I think you should be ok with the cold and wind.

The only disappointment is the once in spring flowering.
[Last edited by S124AB - Nov 21, 2018 3:03 AM (+)]
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