Ask a Question forum→Can I bury a bent seedling deeper to help it grow?

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West Palm Beach, FL (Zone 10b)
MaestroDT
Nov 29, 2018 11:46 AM CST
Sorry if this is a newb question, but I am a newb gardener. I have a tiny little seedling that randomly started growing next to my basil. When I repotted my basil a couple weeks ago, I took the seedling out and put it in its own tiny pot just to let it grow and find out what it is. It was growing decently until but one morning the stem bent over, the leaves were touching the dirt, and I thought it was dead... but it is now growing up from the spot where the leaves hit the dirt. Basically, the stem comes out of the soil, makes a 90 degree turn for half an inch, then turns 90 degrees again and grows upward. I'm pretty certain if it gets much bigger, the wind will just break it. Can I cover the bent part of the stem with more soil?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Nov 29, 2018 11:55 AM CST
Welcome!

That depends upon what kind of plant the seedling is. If you don't know, maybe you could post a photo.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
West Palm Beach, FL (Zone 10b)
MaestroDT
Nov 29, 2018 12:00 PM CST
Certainly can do that. Just didn't think you could really tell until it had gotten a little bigger — but again, I know very little.
Thumb of 2018-11-29/MaestroDT/f99216
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Nov 29, 2018 12:14 PM CST
You are right, I can't tell what it is (cilantro?). But, I can tell you its not the type of plant that you can bury.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
West Palm Beach, FL (Zone 10b)
MaestroDT
Nov 29, 2018 12:16 PM CST
DaisyI said:You are right, I can't tell what it is (cilantro?). But, I can tell you its not the type of plant that you can bury.


I guess it could be cilantro that never sprouted a few months ago, some of the seeds may have gotten recycled around in my soil mixes. Out of curiosity, why *can't* I cover it with more dirt? What happens to the plant if I do?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Nov 29, 2018 12:22 PM CST
The stem will rot from coming into contact with the soil. Plants with stems you can bury, like tomatoes, grow air roots on the stems.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
West Palm Beach, FL (Zone 10b)
MaestroDT
Nov 29, 2018 12:30 PM CST
DaisyI said:The stem will rot from coming into contact with the soil. Plants with stems you can bury, like tomatoes, grow air roots on the stems.


Ah. Ok. Thanks!

So basically, if this seedling dies, it dies. It's pretty much up to nature at this point?
[Last edited by MaestroDT - Nov 29, 2018 12:30 PM (+)]
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Nov 29, 2018 1:20 PM CST
Yes, but, plants are very resilient so it may just survive with a bent stem. If it is cilantro (rub a leaf and smell your fingers), its days are numbered anyway as they are annuals.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
West Palm Beach, FL (Zone 10b)
MaestroDT
Nov 29, 2018 1:49 PM CST
DaisyI said:Yes, but, plants are very resilient so it may just survive with a bent stem. If it is cilantro (rub a leaf and smell your fingers), its days are numbered anyway as they are annuals.


Well, I do have cilantro in another pot, but rubbing the leaves on this seedling, I get no cilantro smell. Would it still smell like cilantro this young?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Nov 29, 2018 3:38 PM CST
Maybe not. How do its looks compare to your other cilantro?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
West Palm Beach, FL (Zone 10b)
MaestroDT
Nov 29, 2018 4:00 PM CST
My other cilantro is fine. I bought it already sprouted over and month ago and it's pretty big. Here's the thing... I went through several phases of seed packets before I figured out how to actually plant and water seedlings... it was about three months of either nothing sprouting or things sprouting and then dying within a week because I wasn't watering them properly. I really *dont* know for sure if I tried planting a whole failed round of cilantro or not, but it's possible it was in one of those mixed bag of herb garden seed collections I had.

So here's a pot with some seedlings where I specifically planted echinacea (purple coneflower) and these look nothing like the images of purple coneflower that I find online.

Thumb of 2018-11-29/MaestroDT/0eef2d

And here is a pot of parsley that is definitely all parsley.

Thumb of 2018-11-29/MaestroDT/70bb7d

To be honest, they all look the same to me and it looks like a cilantro baby based on the leaves.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Nov 29, 2018 5:15 PM CST
You are right, those are not Echinacea. It really looks like more Cilantro. Smiling

Parsley and Cilantro look a lot alike as seedlings but parsley has a slightly thicker leaf.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: seil
St Clair Shores, MI (Zone 6a)
Roses Garden Photography Region: Michigan
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seilMI
Nov 29, 2018 5:18 PM CST
I do that all the time. many of my rose seedlings grow crooked because i start them in the house under lights. when they're ready to pot i just put them in the soil a little crooked to straighten them up. neveer had any problems with it. i've even done it with a bareroot rose that was grafted crooked. just dig a wider hole and plant with the roots slanted and the canes upright. the rosee grew just fine.

sorry about the typing. i'm one handed today due to carpel tunnel surgery.
West Palm Beach, FL (Zone 10b)
MaestroDT
Nov 29, 2018 5:20 PM CST
Ah, so dig it up and rebury it again at an angle? I'm not sure if that would help with this one since it already has a 90 degree angle, but I will keep that in mind for my future babies. Thanks for all your help y'all.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Nov 29, 2018 5:47 PM CST
No, don't dig it up and straighten it. Seil suggested you straighten it up if/when you transplant to your yard.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org
[Last edited by DaisyI - Dec 2, 2018 10:46 AM (+)]
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Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Houseplants Butterflies Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Region: Maryland
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sallyg
Dec 2, 2018 7:53 AM CST
i'd guess it is parsley.
i'm pretty OK today, how are you? ;^)
West Palm Beach, FL (Zone 10b)
MaestroDT
Dec 2, 2018 7:54 AM CST
sallyg said:i'd guess it is parsley.


It's a lot taller than the rest of my parsley (which I started around the same time) but it's totally possible

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