Houseplants forum: Question - House plant that will continue to grow for at least a year?

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curiousnewbiehere
Dec 6, 2018 8:29 AM CST
Hello everyone, I am really new to the whole gardening and growing plants and everything, but I am thinking about getting a plant to grow indoors, but I am hoping to find something that I can buy that will show continued growth for at least a year, if I buy them from the store and start taking care of it. I just tried to google it, but didn't get much back in results, so I am hoping to get some advice from the members of this forum if possible.
Thank you!

Name: Rj
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crawgarden
Dec 6, 2018 11:45 AM CST
I may be misreading your question, but it seems like you want something that will grow easy and difficult to kill.

A Sansevieria Trifasciata, common name: Snake Plant or Mother in laws tongue are pretty bullet proof.
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Name: Gene Staver
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gasrocks
Dec 6, 2018 1:36 PM CST
My oldest house plant is over 75. I have dozens that are over 45. By the time get down to 20, I would not want to count them all. Most house plants will last a year, at least, given proper care and conditions. Google: most popular house plants? Pick something that you like and mentions conditions similar to yours. As Rj mentioned, Sans. are easy but they grow slowly. I sense you are looking for more feedback than one of those might give you. Gene
[Last edited by gasrocks - Dec 6, 2018 2:07 PM (+)]
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SarahCND
Dec 6, 2018 2:09 PM CST
Pothos in my case... nearly impossible to kill :D
Name: Gene Staver
Portage WI 53901 (Zone 5a)
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gasrocks
Dec 6, 2018 2:13 PM CST
Perhaps. Wasn't there just a post here from someone who's Photos is not doing well?
Name: Will Creed
NYC
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WillC
Dec 6, 2018 3:20 PM CST
To have success you have to have a good match between the light requirements of a particular plant species and the light that is available in the location you put it in. If you don't get a good match, then nothing else you do or anyone recommends will matter.

If you could describe in detail the exact location you have in mind for your plant or can post a photo that shows the location, we could probably make some recommendations that would work for you.

An easy plant for one person may not be at all easy for someone else. There are no "bullet-proof" or "impossible to kill" plants.
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curiousnewbiehere
Dec 6, 2018 4:50 PM CST
Hi guys, thanks a lot for the feedback.

Just to clarify though, I am looking for something that I can buy, I guess, then I can water it grow in a year. So, I guess something that I don't have to start from the scratch, but maybe just budding plant that you can buy from local store, but you can actually see clear growth from when you buy it from month to month. I am like new at this, but thinking about maybe giving it a go, but want to get one that you could see it growing like you might if you were to buy a puppy, but something that grows fast enough I guess over a year

curiousnewbiehere
Dec 6, 2018 6:57 PM CST
crawgarden said:I may be misreading your question, but it seems like you want something that will grow easy and difficult to kill.

A Sansevieria Trifasciata, common name: Snake Plant or Mother in laws tongue are pretty bullet proof.


Actually more like something I can water and grow, and it will show its growth at least for a first year. I wasn't thinking about it dying or anything i guess

curiousnewbiehere
Dec 6, 2018 6:58 PM CST
gasrocks said:My oldest house plant is over 75. I have dozens that are over 45. By the time get down to 20, I would not want to count them all. Most house plants will last a year, at least, given proper care and conditions. Google: most popular house plants? Pick something that you like and mentions conditions similar to yours. As Rj mentioned, Sans. are easy but they grow slowly. I sense you are looking for more feedback than one of those might give you. Gene


I am hoping to find something that will show evident growth at least for a first year before it peaks out. So that from the moment that i buy it, it will show growth

curiousnewbiehere
Dec 6, 2018 6:59 PM CST
WillC said:To have success you have to have a good match between the light requirements of a particular plant species and the light that is available in the location you put it in. If you don't get a good match, then nothing else you do or anyone recommends will matter.

If you could describe in detail the exact location you have in mind for your plant or can post a photo that shows the location, we could probably make some recommendations that would work for you.

An easy plant for one person may not be at all easy for someone else. There are no "bullet-proof" or "impossible to kill" plants.


Probably by the window, I'm looking for a small plant, I guess. Nothing too fancy. But something that's not going to look a carbon copy in a year's time, but will grow as I water it, at least for a first year
Name: Gene Staver
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gasrocks
Dec 6, 2018 8:15 PM CST
Have you ever put the top of a carrot in a dish of water?
Name: Sally
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sallyg
Dec 6, 2018 9:14 PM CST
Or an avocado pit in a glass of water?
Lemon seeds seem pretty easy to sprout.

Big box stores sell some plants in 3-4 inch small pots. As Will said, if you don't get a good match of plant to location, it will not do well. But a Pothos in a small starter, in an average, not too dim or too bright, place.. will only have a few leaves to start and you'll probably notice as it grows and is a fairly common not too picky plant.
Or a Lucky bamboo...

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Name: Cassie
SW Missouri US (Zone 6b)
Crofton09
Dec 6, 2018 9:50 PM CST
Hi, Newbie! I think I understand your question after your analogy of a puppy.

I am rather new too and my most enjoyable plant to watch grow and is fairly easy is my pothos (which others have suggested). It's very cheap at big box stores or local nurseries and comes in many variations (some more expensive than others). I got mine as cuttings from a friend about 14 months ago and some of the vines hang about 3 feet now. You also take cuttings and fill every window if you wanted.

Your options are limited to what direction the window is facing that you would like to put it in and if it is blocked by a tree or another structure. I've found a good way to decide if I have enough light for a certain plant is by downloading a light meter app on my phone. By realizing your limitations, you avoid the disappointment of watching your puppy slowly starve and die. Hilarious!
Name: Sue Taylor
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kniphofia
Dec 6, 2018 11:31 PM CST
Tradescantia or inch plant make decent growth and there are some nice variegated ones available. But as Will says, the location and amount of light available is more important than anything else when buying a houseplant.
Name: Frenchy
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Frenchy21
Dec 6, 2018 11:49 PM CST
Another plant that grows fairly fast is Baby Rubber Plant (Peperomia obtusifolia). There is also a variegated version. They are a bit less demanding of bright light.
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purpleinopp
Dec 7, 2018 5:44 AM CST
HI & welcome! It sounds like you want one of the plants that grow very quickly.

Cane Begonias grow very quickly, don't need to be in the most sunny spot in the house, and offer the added bonus of blooms.

A few of my favs:
Begonia 'Castaway'
Begonia 'Corallina de Lucerna'
Dwarf Trout Leaf Begonia (Begonia 'Medora')

Wax Begonia doesn't get enough credit for being a great houseplant:
Dwarf Trout Leaf Begonia (Begonia 'Medora')

This plant usually needs to be obtained from sharing, not usually in stores, and grows SO fast.
Basket Plant (Callisia fragrans)

This plant has the added bonus of scented foliage Variegated Cuban Oregano (Coleus amboinicus 'Variegatus')

Ti plants grow quickly, and come in many different colors of leaf. I like this red one Ti Plant (Cordyline fruticosa 'Red Sister')

Another vote for Pothos Pothos (Epipremnum aureum)

Heart-leaf vine is similar to Pothos Heart Leaf Vine (Philodendron hederaceum var. oxycardium)

Swedish ivy Swedish Ivy (Plectranthus verticillatus)

If you have a sunny windowsill where a plant can be right by the window, these grow really fast Milk Bush (Euphorbia tirucalli)
Devil's Backbone (Euphorbia tithymaloides)

These like tons of sun, grow quickly, bloom over winter:
Flaming Katy (Kalanchoe blossfeldiana)
Lavender Scallops (Kalanchoe fedtschenkoi)
Scarlet Kleinia (Kleinia fulgens)



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Name: Erica
Ohio (Zone 6a)
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OpieDoodle
Dec 7, 2018 7:33 AM CST
I think there are many plants that fit what you're wanting but I do believe understanding your lighting situation will be very important in helping you pick the best plant for you! Do you have a location in mind (how close to windows, water direction is the windows, direct or indirect light) to keep your plant? Where are you located?

Another thing to consider is how big of a plant do you want. There are some plants that stay relatively small and others that get massive to where it can be a struggle finding them a place to stay in the house.

With all that being said I will tell you about some of my favorites. I love trailing plants. These are plants that as they grow the hang down the sides of the pot. I really like tradescantias (Wandering Jew) and there are many varieties and colors, I also love pothos as over time they get big leaves. Both of those are often trailing plants and as they get long you can give the plant a hair cut and replant the cuttings! So you can either make your plant fuller or you can give them away! I love to share my plants so this is probably why I love these two types. Both of these are pretty hardy plants for the most part.

I also really like Ivy and have had a lot of success with it indoors (and outdoors for that matter) but I have learned that not everyone has great luck with them and they can be a magnet for pests.

Those are my favorite in terms of faster growing plants that you'll notice a big difference in a year. If you have higher light situations you can also look at Jades and things like that but they can be slower growers but mine grows pretty significantly each spring-fall.
Name: Will Creed
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WillC
Dec 7, 2018 10:03 AM CST
Try a Money Tree (Pachira Aquatica) grown in a small pot filled with water and pebbles. It will do well on your windowsill. It is easy to care for as long as you don't repot it and keep the water level up high. It is also a pretty fast grower.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

curiousnewbiehere
Dec 7, 2018 7:33 PM CST
gasrocks said:Have you ever put the top of a carrot in a dish of water?


No but not sure what you mean by that

curiousnewbiehere
Dec 7, 2018 7:39 PM CST
sallyg said:Or an avocado pit in a glass of water?
Lemon seeds seem pretty easy to sprout.

Big box stores sell some plants in 3-4 inch small pots. As Will said, if you don't get a good match of plant to location, it will not do well. But a Pothos in a small starter, in an average, not too dim or too bright, place.. will only have a few leaves to start and you'll probably notice as it grows and is a fairly common not too picky plant.
Or a Lucky bamboo...


I am looking for an actual plant, I guess. I am really looking for something that I can place by the window, I guess, hoping watering and sunlight would be good for it, and I hear that Pothos quite a lot too. Do Pothos grow for a full year?

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