Daylilies forum: What Natural Mulch Works Well for Daylilies?

Views: 784, Replies: 6 » Jump to the end
Name: Tina
Where the desert meets the sea (Zone 9b)
Daylilies Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Dog Lover Birds Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Garden Ideas: Level 2
Image
chalyse
Jun 27, 2012 6:50 AM CST
After four years of using wood-chip mulch, we are looking for an alternative that:

- is biodegradable
- un-painted
- pest free
- pet friendly

By now our wood-chip mulch is three inches deep in places (hard to keep the soil in planting areas well mixed), the pup likes to chew and swallow bits of the chips, and i dislike having the paint or dye the chips were treated with go into the soil. I've recently seen straw of some sort used, and would love to hear about it (as well as other options); what type is used, where its bought, how well it biodegrades, how tidy/messy, etc?).

Any ideas are welcome!Thumb of 2012-06-27/chalyse/c1f8dd
Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of old; seek what those of old sought. — Basho

Daylilies that thrive? click here! Thumbs up
[Last edited by chalyse - Jun 27, 2012 6:51 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #278366 (1)
Name: Jan
Hustisford, WI
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cat Lover Daylilies Dog Lover Irises Region: United States of America
Region: Wisconsin
Image
philljm
Jun 27, 2012 12:59 PM CST
Realize that with straw, you might get some weed seeds in it. Not that it's too much of a problem, and heck, even the bagged dirt I have bought has things germinating in it. I haven't used it as a mulch on my flower gardens yet - only because I haven't thought about it. Also, straw is hollow - which might make it a very good mulch- but I only have experience using it to bed my farm animals!

I am currently using wood chips in some beds, and last falls leaves in others. Verdict is still out as to which I prefer.~Jan
Name: Cynthia (Cindy)
Melvindale, Mi (Zone 5b)
Hybridizer Irises Butterflies Charter ATP Member Birds Cat Lover
Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Vegetable Grower Daylilies Hummingbirder Heucheras
Image
Hemlady
Jun 27, 2012 3:59 PM CST
I use wood chips myself.
Lighthouse Gardens
Name: Michele
Cantonment, FL zone 8b
Seller of Garden Stuff Region: United States of America Pollen collector Dragonflies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Florida
Birds Butterflies Container Gardener Hummingbirder Garden Ideas: Level 2 Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Image
tink3472
Jun 27, 2012 4:19 PM CST
I use pine bark (the dime size pieces). I don't know if you'd really call it being used as a mulch because that's what my soil is, pine bark and 10% sand. At my old place where I had in ground beds I did use it a mulch because I got tired of the big, chunky wood pieces with the dye.
[url=www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com]www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com[/url]
Name: Tina
Where the desert meets the sea (Zone 9b)
Daylilies Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Dog Lover Birds Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Garden Ideas: Level 2
Image
chalyse
Jun 27, 2012 4:46 PM CST
now i'm very intrigued! thanks for the info's about wood-type chips! I agree with tink about the dye - uck! and the pieces DH likes to put in are huuuuge, so its very hard to work the soil now...

so ... i'm assuming the smaller wood chips, even if 90% of the mix (as eventually they would be...) work well for the plants and retaining moisture? any you can get them at local nurseries? (i'm not sure i've ever noticed smaller, natural color chips available ... should i check closer?)

much appreciated info!
Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of old; seek what those of old sought. — Basho

Daylilies that thrive? click here! Thumbs up
Name: Juli
(Zone 5b)
Region: United States of America Charter ATP Member Cottage Gardener Daylilies Garden Photography Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Birds Hummingbirder Butterflies Dog Lover Cat Lover Garden Ideas: Master Level
Image
daylily
Jun 27, 2012 4:58 PM CST
I prefer pine bark mulch. It is not shredded like the more common mulch. It is tiny pieces, not long shreds. I found the shredded stuff packed down, and was hard or water to get through. It is more expensive. Shredded hardwood might last 1 year, but the pine bark chips last 3-4 here. So, it is less expensive in the long run.

I tried straw once. Oh, my... The weeds were terrible!
Name: Rita
North Shore, Long Island, NY
Zone 6B
Charter ATP Member Seed Starter Tomato Heads I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Vegetable Grower Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Birds Garden Ideas: Master Level Butterflies Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Roses Hummingbirder
Image
Newyorkrita
Jun 27, 2012 6:53 PM CST
Well, my preferred mulch is a very thick carpet of fall leaves simply because they are free. I go around the neighborhood in the fall and collect bags off the curb and spread them around the garden. You do have to go somewhat thick as you want the leaves to last till the next fall when the process is repeated. I never shred them, I just put them. Most of my daylilies are nestled in a thick carpet of leaves.

If I don't use leaves I use straw. I prefer the leaves because they are free and I have to pay for bales of straw. Don't use hay as it has more seeds but even cuttings of straw sometimes have a lot of the seed heads in them. You buy bales of straw at any farm supply store. The type of place that sells horse feed. My daylilies on my sideyard slope which is a steep hill are mulched in straw as the straw stays in place better on a slope whereas leaves would slide down the hill. I also just mulched all my tomato gardens in straw yesterday. Keeps the weeds away and keeps the soil off the tomato leaves. Plus I think straw looks good but then I realise others might not agree. It is very good for the soil as earthworms move in and help break it down to supply fertilizer for the garden.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Daylilies forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by Paul2032 and is called "French Marigold"