Daylilies forum: Transplanting seedlings into the garden

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Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
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Natalie
Aug 25, 2012 8:31 AM CST
I've gotten a late start this year in getting my seeds started from crosses that I made last year. I've been germinating them first in the fridge, and then planting the seeds in pots outside. All are growing well so far, but I've still got more seeds to get planted as they germinate. I'm wondering if it would be safe to transplant them in the ground before winter, or would it be better to leave them in pots for the winter? They are growing in 4" tall pots, and I noticed a couple of roots poking out of the bottom of the pots already, after only a month. So far, the roots are only poking out of a couple of them that I checked, but I didn't check all of them. I was surprised to see roots that deep already. I have a cold frame that I can put them in, but I'd rather not do that if it's safe to plant them outside. I'm pretty sure I'd need to put them in gallon pots to overwinter them, but I'm not sure about that either. This is only my second year at starting daylily seeds, so any advice would be most appreciated! Most of the seedlings, if not all, should be dormants.
Natalie
Name: Cynthia (Cindy)
Melvindale, Mi (Zone 5b)
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Hemlady
Aug 25, 2012 9:58 AM CST
I still have some in pots that I plan on putting in the ground within the next 3 days. I am going to mulch them and I think they will be fine. As long as they get at least 4 to 6 weeks of settling in before a hard freeze, they should be alright. I plant my seedlings every August and have only lost a few and those were mostly semi'evs and evergreens.
Lighthouse Gardens
Name: Tina
Where the desert meets the sea (Zone 9b)
Daylilies Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Dog Lover Birds Enjoys or suffers hot summers
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chalyse
Aug 25, 2012 11:04 AM CST
This is a question I also have, but about Semi's and Evergreen seedlings (about the same size as mentioned). Do they fare better as potted seedlings through a mild winter (8b ... perhaps a week or two of 25-32 degree weather each year), or okay in the flowerbed?

If they should say in pots, do I keep them unwatered in a cold frame? If planted, must I mulch? Are they hardy enough that smallish pots can just sit out unprotected?

... going to be a long winter waiting to see how they all do Sticking tongue out
Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of old; seek what those of old sought. — Basho

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Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Aug 25, 2012 11:51 AM CST
Cindy, just wanted to clarify something. If they are now growing well in pots, does that lessen the amount of time that they should be in the ground before it freezes? I got my seedlings planted last time way before it froze, so I have no idea what I'm doing this year. We've had snow here in September before, but I don't think that will happen this year. And, I don't think it will be freezing then anyway, so I guess I have a little time. I'm also worried about the late start I got and wonder if I need to be planting the germinated seeds into the flower bed, instead of in pots first. I'd prefer to put them in pots, just to keep a better eye on them, but I do want them to survive!

Tina, I'm pretty sure that none of mine are going to be evergreen, but there is always the possibility of a SEV being in there. All these worries! Hopefully we can both get some help!
Natalie
Name: Michele
Cantonment, FL zone 8b
Seller of Garden Stuff Region: United States of America Pollen collector Dragonflies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Florida
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tink3472
Aug 25, 2012 12:33 PM CST
Tina,

I'm sure our climates are different but I'm in zone 8b and we plant ours in the ground each fall. Fred has his planted in the ground no later than Sept 15th. and he's about the same weather as us. Last year I got mind planted in seed trays late and then put them in gallon pots because I had to move. I didn't actually get them into the bed until November I think. I didn't lose any to the cold.
I did have some that we're left in pots and they do fine and don't need a cold frame in mild winter climates. I just watered them when I watered all the other daylilies, once or twice a week.
If you don't normally mulch I wouldn't think you would need to mulch the seedlings as long as they have enough time to get their roots established in the ground, general rule is about 6 weeks before your first freeze.
[url=www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com]www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com[/url]
Name: Cynthia (Cindy)
Melvindale, Mi (Zone 5b)
Hybridizer Irises Butterflies Charter ATP Member Birds Cat Lover
Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Vegetable Grower Daylilies Hummingbirder Heucheras
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Hemlady
Aug 25, 2012 1:37 PM CST
Agree with Michele Tina.

Natalie, not sure I understand your question but I think you are saying if they are growing well in the pots will they need less to to acclimate in the ground. I really don't know. Mine have 3 to 4 leaves now. Some are 8" high. I am thinking they should do fine but I still am going to mulch them to be on the safe side. I had hubby dig out some large seedling clumps to make room for my babies but it is much too hot out now to plant. It is around 90 and I am going to wait till it cools down in the next day or two to plant. Just keeping my spots ready for now. Might be planting on Monday.
Lighthouse Gardens
Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Aug 25, 2012 2:33 PM CST
Cindy, You were right about me wondering if they needing as much time to acclimate in the ground if they are growing good in the pots. I wasn't sure we were thinking the same thing! I've got the same problem with high heat myself, and know it would be bad to transplant them right now, but if I have to I will. I guess I'd just have to make some shade for them. My seedlings have only been growing for a month at the most, and the tallest is only about 7 inches tall. The roots seem to be doing good though since some of them are growing out the bottom of the 4" tall pots. Since for the most part, I wouldn't be disturbing the roots any, I would think it would be somewhat safe to plant them in the ground before it freezes, but that is where I'm not sure, since they are still really small. I've got some crosses that I'm excited about and I'd hate to lose them!
Natalie
Name: Cynthia (Cindy)
Melvindale, Mi (Zone 5b)
Hybridizer Irises Butterflies Charter ATP Member Birds Cat Lover
Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Vegetable Grower Daylilies Hummingbirder Heucheras
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Hemlady
Aug 25, 2012 2:37 PM CST
I can understand your concern. If you are worried about loosing them, maybe you could leave them in the pots, turn the pots on their sides and then mulch the pots heavily. I have heard that works although I have never tried it. Or you could do the same but only put them in a shelter like a garage.
Lighthouse Gardens
Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Aug 25, 2012 4:09 PM CST
I've got a cold frame that I'm hoping to heat a little with barrels of water, since I've heard that works. But, since they are dormants, I have no clue as to whether or not they need some freezing temps! I really new at all of this!
Natalie
Name: Tina
Where the desert meets the sea (Zone 9b)
Daylilies Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Dog Lover Birds Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Garden Ideas: Level 2
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chalyse
Aug 27, 2012 4:19 AM CST
Its so reassuring to have all this great advice; thanks! Hurray! I'm so used to losing half my garden over the extremes of summer heat and winter cooling, that I still must be underestimating the easier care of daylilies ... they have amazed me over and over again this summer, and I can see now that they'll likely do so again this winter Hilarious! You've given me the confidence to try splitting them up, some in the flowerbed, some in pots, just based on what I want to have in the garden or on the porch. Group hug
Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of old; seek what those of old sought. — Basho

Daylilies that thrive? click here! Thumbs up
Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Aug 27, 2012 10:32 AM CST
I agree It's like having the best of the best, all in one convenient place! And, the best of the best lets us pick their brains for information! It doesn't get any better!
Natalie
Name: virginiarose
Virginia
Money talks but Chocolate Sings!
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Level 1 Avid Green Pages Reviewer Hibiscus Dragonflies Daylilies
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virginiarose
Nov 19, 2012 8:32 AM CST
How Long Does It Take a Daylily to Grow From a Seed? How long before it would bloom?

Susan

In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.....Margaret Atwood
Name: Michele
Cantonment, FL zone 8b
Seller of Garden Stuff Region: United States of America Pollen collector Dragonflies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Florida
Birds Butterflies Container Gardener Hummingbirder Garden Ideas: Level 2 Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
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tink3472
Nov 19, 2012 3:59 PM CST
A seed usually germinates in 3-7 days and starts to send up the green, sometimes it takes a few months to germinate. From there it will continue to grow and grow, but how long it takes to grow into a mature plant just depends on your zone and when it was planted. Here a daylily can bloom in about 7 months if the seedlings (that are 5-6 weeks old) are planted in the ground (or pots) by Sept. 15th. But some areas it takes 2-3 years to see blooms.
I can't find it at the moment, but on some of Fred's threads he shows the progress of the growth of his seedlings. I'm sure he'll pop in and maybe post a few photos.
[url=www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com]www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com[/url]
Name: virginiarose
Virginia
Money talks but Chocolate Sings!
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Level 1 Avid Green Pages Reviewer Hibiscus Dragonflies Daylilies
Bee Lover Dahlias Butterflies Hostas Birds Lilies
virginiarose
Nov 19, 2012 4:20 PM CST
Yeah, thanks Tink. I actually had the misfortune of meeting someone who criticized me for buying single fans and said they would take 2-3 years to bloom. This lady lived in Florida. I read that a seed can bloom in one year if you live in a mild climate. I do not live in Florida but I am not exactly zone 5 either. I don't understand why it would take that long for a single fan to bloom in Florida. Confused

I would like to try some seeds maybe next year, do you think I might be able to collect some off my own plants? Or should I buy them?
Susan

In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.....Margaret Atwood
Name: Michele
Cantonment, FL zone 8b
Seller of Garden Stuff Region: United States of America Pollen collector Dragonflies I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Region: Florida
Birds Butterflies Container Gardener Hummingbirder Garden Ideas: Level 2 Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
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tink3472
Nov 19, 2012 7:25 PM CST
Wow, I don't know why they would say a single fan would take that long to bloom in Florida!!

Sure you can collect some off of your own plants Thumbs up
[url=www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com]www.pensacoladaylilyclub.com[/url]
Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Nov 19, 2012 7:48 PM CST
Susan, I think it depends on the single fan that you bought as to whether or not it would take 2-3 years to bloom. I've got seedings that are 2 years old and haven't bloomed yet. These are ones that I hybridized myself and started them from seed. I had a few that bloomed, but all of them were 2 years old. It will be at least 3 years for the rest.

If you bought a fan that was divided off of a mature plant that had bloomed previously, I would think that it is very possible that it will bloom the first year for you. I've bought single fans myself, and a few of them were blooming within a month of planting them. I'm in a much colder zone than you are, so if I saw blooms in a month, I would expect that you could too, depending on the fan.
Natalie
Name: Jan
Hustisford, WI
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cat Lover Daylilies Dog Lover Irises Region: United States of America
Region: Wisconsin
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philljm
Nov 19, 2012 7:53 PM CST
FYI, I planted 45 3 month old seedlings outside last summer. Almost 50% of them bloomed this summer. Granted, winter was mild, and spring arrived early, but even with the drought, I was impressed.

This years seedlings didn't do so well, I only planted 24, and lost 3 already. Of course, the drought didn't help, and the extreme overgrowth of the tomato plants in the same bed probably didn't help.

I start my seeds indoors in the spring, and plant outside in early summer. Last year I experimented with direct seeding some outside, that didn't work so well. I am impressed with people that can do that.

Great advice here
Name: virginiarose
Virginia
Money talks but Chocolate Sings!
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Level 1 Avid Green Pages Reviewer Hibiscus Dragonflies Daylilies
Bee Lover Dahlias Butterflies Hostas Birds Lilies
virginiarose
Nov 19, 2012 8:30 PM CST
I believe they will be fine. Single fans are great if you can't afford a double and I figure it will get big soon enough. Thumbs up
Susan

In the spring, at the end of the day, you should smell like dirt.....Margaret Atwood

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