Winterizing Roses in the Extremes: Winterising roses.

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Winterizing Roses in the Extremes

By Joannabanana
November 23, 2015

For a number of years I have been growing hybrid teas, floribundas, miniatures and of course hardy shrubs. Mid October to mid November is the time to put the roses to bed for the winter.

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Name: Arif Masud
Alpha Centauri (Zone 9a)
Native Plants and Wildflowers I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Container Gardener Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Enjoys or suffers hot summers Multi-Region Gardener
KAMasud
Oct 6, 2012 6:11 AM CST
I love roses and the problem here is how to get them through the heat but now i feel comfortable in knowing that i have the knowledge how to get them through minus 40 centigrade? 40, at that temperature the cells should burst due to crystal formation. The secret lies in the peat moss and heat of decomposition. Woow, opens up a lot of avenues knowing that.
Regards,
Masud.
Name: Joanne
Calgary, AB Canada (Zone 3a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Canadian Charter ATP Member Seed Starter Roses
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Annuals Container Gardener Vegetable Grower Winter Sowing Enjoys or suffers cold winters
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Joannabanana
Oct 6, 2012 11:11 AM CST
KAMasud,

I don't have to deal with extreme heat, but I would suspect that planting at a good depth would also help with more consistent moisture availability at the roots.
Name: Arif Masud
Alpha Centauri (Zone 9a)
Native Plants and Wildflowers I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Container Gardener Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Enjoys or suffers hot summers Multi-Region Gardener
KAMasud
Oct 7, 2012 4:30 AM CST
Hi. I tried that Smiling . There is a length of stem between the crown and where it starts to branch out into a bush shape. If you plant the crown deep, then this stem gets attacked by fungus due to moisture, plus fertilisers corrode it. Second, the roots are at a level where it has proven to be a bit difficult to send moisture down. That is one thing i won't try again, this summer i lost two roses (hope its only two) due to these reasons. The only option is to change the microclimate.
Palms, i will shift my palms next summer let them enjoy the sun while my roses enjoy some patchy shade. I have also put down a few small trees like Viburnum. I hope that should be enough climate engineering for roses.
Grafted roses seem to get into trouble in summer while roses from cuttings seem to relish the heat, I wonder why.
I am confused on one issue. What is the performance difference between grafted and cuttings, do you have any knowledge about that. To me, roses from cuttings seem to be bigger in size and more healthy.
Regards,
Masud.
Name: Joanne
Calgary, AB Canada (Zone 3a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Canadian Charter ATP Member Seed Starter Roses
Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Annuals Container Gardener Vegetable Grower Winter Sowing Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Image
Joannabanana
Nov 9, 2013 7:40 PM CST
Hi Masud,

I don't have any experience with rose cuttings, but really enjoy all the beautiful grafted roses that give a beautiful display the throughout the growing season.

You may want to think of a cutting being a small slip that roots and starts a new plant that will take years to grow to large plant size. Grafted roses are typically a very large size. I'm sure some of our "Rose Experts" on ATP can give a better explanation...please.

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