Containers forum: Container plants and overwintering cuttings

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Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
I'm always on my way out the door..
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Forum moderator Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Dog Lover Cottage Gardener
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chelle
Aug 8, 2013 11:03 AM CST
We came from here The thread "It's time to poke your pots" in Containers forum but we strayed away from the original topic. So...let's talk about taking cuttings from our summer container plants to keep over winter indoors.

Cinta said:chelle, I do not know if you have had this plant before but it is gorgeous in the spring because of the pink edge so it makes a beautiful plant Spring to Fall.

Thumb of 2013-08-08/Cinta/653869

The ones you have that can be kept over for next year could be easier than your normal houseplants I am sure purple and I could talk you though taking some cuttings if any of them really make your heart beat and you want them for next summer pots.

I am so cheap I hate to have to buy the same plants every summer and sometimes you cannot find them again the following summer.

Purple helped me with an easy way to be able to have Purple Shield every year because the nurseries do not sell it every year and I love this plant. I have so many of them now rooted in water I can have them all over the yard next year.


Do you mean this one? This is the first year I've had it, and I like it! It's a wonderful plant that's so easy. Thumbs up

Thumb of 2013-08-08/chelle/e16616


I had good luck growing polemonium (from seed) in a container this year, so I really have high hopes for those new ones. They're wonderful!

So, I can keep cuttings over in a dry house with very little light? The ones I've managed to keep alive so far are Aptenia cordifolia and Plectranthus.


Cottage Gardening

Newest Interest: Rock Gardens


Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Cinta
Aug 8, 2013 12:10 PM CST
Hop in here Purple.

Yes I am talking about that Purple Shield. I love that plant and the nurseries do not sell it every year. I kept one alive all winter in the house in the basement laundry room, no window light with a glass of water once a month. It was ugly but it was beautiful a few weeks after going outside the next Spring.

Purple said just take a cutting and put it in a glass of water in a week or two you will have roots and a new plant.

I have to go back and look at the other ones to comment. I have heard people take cutting of the coleus and keep them in a glass of water all winter. My mother use to do that when I was a kid so I know that works.

Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
I'm always on my way out the door..
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Forum moderator Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Dog Lover Cottage Gardener
Native Plants and Wildflowers Plant Identifier Organic Gardener Keeps Horses Hummingbirder Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
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chelle
Aug 8, 2013 2:21 PM CST
Wow. I didn't know that about the coleus. The stem doesn't rot during a 6 or 7 month period of time? Do you change the water daily?

You know...I'd heard that Salvia Black and Blue could be kept in a partially closed ziplock in a cold closet for the winter; sounds like the Persian Shield could be done the same way....hmmmm. I'm envisioning some kind of bag rack now! Whistling Hang the bags with clothespins, maybe.
Cottage Gardening

Newest Interest: Rock Gardens


Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Aug 9, 2013 7:19 AM CST
When I lived in Columbus, OH, I guess winter was that long, mid-Oct. to about mid-April. I'd blocked those horrible memories it took years of therapy to get past until you dredged them back up! But, while the horror is still fresh in my memory again, yes, you can keep cuttings of PS in water. Always put mine on a windowsill, had N & S windows at the last place, so can't speak to any method/light situation besides that. Also did Coleus there the same way.

Coleus needs more light during winter than you might think. Even down here, they like being in a south, east, or west window, but not so much in a north one. PS doesn't seem to care which window. Also had great success keeping Perilla 'Magilla' in water, and one year, some kind of tall red Alternanthera. Almost any flowering 'annual' plant wintering inside would like as much sun as possible. The rays in winter are much weaker, and of shorter duration, so any kind of sunburn is unlikely (even on a shade plant) that's been outside for summer. I'd love to know if anyone has managed to do that with something. I'm famous for sunburning any kind of potted plant, but have only managed to do it to 'house plants' so far.

There are anecdotes of many other kinds of plants surviving winter as a cutting in water. If it's just going to be turned to mush by frost and you have the space, worth a try (for true tender perennials, not real annuals) IMO. Stuff that's easy to grow from seed, I wouldn't spend indoor space on, but some might want to try to have "a huge one" next year, so might negate the seed-ease thing for them. Coleus does grow easily from seed, but the only seeds I ever see are rainbow and wizard.

In general, long-term water cuttings... a jar with a large opening is best, the roots can fill a bottle and be impossible to remove from one shaped like a coke bottle. Don't forget to check if they need water. Rinse roots, container, and replace water if it gets any kind of color or scent. Otherwise, I don't change water, there's way too many of them for that. No leaves under the water, they will just rot. If debris falls in there (Coleus will keep making flowers after it's made some roots, discard a leaf occasionally,) it will sour the water, maybe float on top and get moldy, so keep an eye out for that so you can get it out of there if something falls in.

Potted plants give a lot more options for overwintering. Wax Begonia is one of my favorites, keeps blooming & growing all winter. Aptenia and (many) Plectranthus are common house plants, so absolutely worth overwintering attempt. Either of these can be snipped and stuck in a pot next to some other plant to hitch-hike inside for winter if desired, or given pots. At the "wrong time of year" for propagation, I have a lot better luck sticking cuttings in existing pots vs. new pots with no existing roots to dry the soil regularly.

Datura survived coming in potted last winter, and several cane Begonias. Tahitian bridal veil (Gibasis geniculata,) any Tradescantia, Pelargonium (zonal Geranium,) so many other pretties can be saved.

After seeing Marquest's beautiful potted plant that lounged in her basement for winter, I would turn to her for winter care for a potted plant. I've never killed one bringing it inside, but have also never had a good looking plant to put back outside in spring. The leaves all fall off except for a few at the tips. I've tried putting them in great light and had the same results so last winter, I only kept one, on top of the microwave, and let other plants have the 'good spots.' There's a window next to that, but it faces north and a porch roof is over it, so it's light, but never direct except maybe a few minutes right before sunset.

This is my favorite thing in gardening at all, overwintering. So much that I've completely disregarded the 'rules' for plants and am using house plants as annuals, insisting that tender annuals perform perennially, hardly have any real perennials 'cuz most of them only put on a show for a few weeks and just seem to be 'in the way' of prettier plants. I buy with an overwintering eye. If it's an annual that can't be saved, I'll probably pass for something I can, unless it's a really good nectar plant for butterflies and humming birds. The 'flower beds' are full of tropical plants (mostly just foliage,) and anything that will make nectar. It's what makes me happy. People walking by say, "I love your flowers" but there are hardly any. I'm still going to spend my 'garden money' every year, but I like for it to go to something new, not the same old stuff. Eventually I'd like to reach the point where I say to myself, "All I need this year is some prettier pots," or even get into some bigger, more expensive stuff like shrubs or fruit trees, hardscape items. With such a small house and no basement, I'm not too hard on myself for 'needing' new plants instead.

This year, I'm going to attempt to keep Pentas, and Heliotrope, both to be potted once rooted, though never did a cutting of the last, will see. Angelonia is not a true annual, I'm wondering about that also. Any anecdotes on these?

Polemonium was (supposedly) perennial when I had some in OH. It did come back the next year, then I moved, so really don't know much about that plant. The variegated leaves were why I got it. Hardly any of the plants I have have plain green leaves, unless they are of an unusual shape like heart-leaf Philo.

What else are people saving? Enable, enable...

These were better last year, when July actually had some sun!
Thumb of 2013-08-09/purpleinopp/48399b

House plant or annual (tender perennial?) The lines are blurred here!
Thumb of 2013-08-09/purpleinopp/acb98d

Let your imagination run wild! This spring, this pot was just Thanksgiving cactus. Will all of these plants stay alive in side this winter? IDK, but would bet on "most."
Thumb of 2013-08-09/purpleinopp/2612d3

👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
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☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.
[Last edited by purpleinopp - Aug 9, 2013 7:25 AM (+)]
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Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Cinta
Aug 9, 2013 7:46 AM CST
Tiffany, our garden style are very similar. I look at plants for color foliage. I tell every new gardener when they ask for advice Flowers are fleeting foliage is forever. If you put together great colorful foliage and awesome garden ornament what I call the jewelry of the garden people will drool.

To accomplish that I head for houseplants and tropical plants.

I will look for the Persian Shield pic and post it later today. It was ugly all winter but it was in the basement with minimal care but once it got outside in the heat and rain it was gorgeous.
Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
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purpleinopp
Aug 9, 2013 8:45 AM CST
Yes, yes yes!

Remembered moss roses too, Portulaca.
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☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
I'm always on my way out the door..
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Forum moderator Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Dog Lover Cottage Gardener
Native Plants and Wildflowers Plant Identifier Organic Gardener Keeps Horses Hummingbirder Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
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chelle
Aug 9, 2013 9:47 AM CST
purpleinopp said:.... I have a lot better luck sticking cuttings in existing pots vs. new pots with no existing roots to dry the soil regularly.


This is a very helpful tip! Thumbs up It makes perfect sense!

Thanks!




purpleinopp said:

These were better last year, when July actually had some sun!
Thumb of 2013-08-09/purpleinopp/48399b




Heh-heh...I've Plectranthus barbatus seedlings, Japanese morning glories and Silene armeria in a tub exactly like yours! Big Grin


purpleinopp said:
What else are people saving? Enable, enable...

I've overwintered tropical Plumbago in the crawlspace under the house. Sadly, I set it out and forgot about it in our horribly droughty spring last year and lost it.

Cottage Gardening

Newest Interest: Rock Gardens


Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Bulbs Foliage Fan Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents
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purpleinopp
Aug 9, 2013 1:19 PM CST
"I have a lot better luck sticking cuttings in existing pots vs. new pots with no existing roots to dry the soil regularly."

Wish I could take credit for this, but read it recently and it was like a light going on. I realized this is so true, looking back, and that I'd been doing it subconsciously in a lot of instances anyway. I think it's worth realizing as a complete, separate thought about propagating from cuttings, and repeating, highlighting. I sympathize with those who don't like the look of mixed pots though, I know my taste is off the wild edge of the scale. If it's "only for winter," maybe that helps a little.

Ooh Plumbago is pretty! Streptocarpella is easy to bring inside, Fuchsia, Impatiens. Bought a cute little Alternanthera (Calico plant) a few years ago that makes a tiny little bush a few inches tall in the annuals section but it's much better as a potted plant (so you can actually see it) and is fine coming inside for winter.
👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
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Garden Ideas: Level 1
sewNsow
Aug 28, 2013 11:12 AM CST
I can't add much to this discussion because I carry lots of plants over in my greenhouse but I wanted to say that the cutting propagated angelonia is one of my easiest plants.I have started cuttings of this in water.I just love the Angel face blue.It never gets buggy which is a big plus for me.
After a cool summer we are getting sweltering temps & humidity! No rain since early July.I was thinking of an unusually early fall but have changed my mind.
sewNsow
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
I'm always on my way out the door..
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Forum moderator Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Dog Lover Cottage Gardener
Native Plants and Wildflowers Plant Identifier Organic Gardener Keeps Horses Hummingbirder Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Image
chelle
Aug 28, 2013 1:25 PM CST
Same here. No rain to speak of for two months and cool, but now we're sweltering in the still and heavy air of late summer. I'm dearly looking forward to getting off the water-go-round, and instead, plunging my hands back into some dirt! I've had time (and energy!) enough to snip only a few cuttings so far.
Another slow-down for me is the end of season specials plants that arrived just before the heat hit -they need so much care right now. I'm not planting them out until we get some measurable rain...surely it'll come soon. Whistling

It is great butterfly weather though. Thumbs up Big Grin
Cottage Gardening

Newest Interest: Rock Gardens


Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Bulbs Foliage Fan Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents
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purpleinopp
Aug 29, 2013 12:43 PM CST
Well that's fantastic to hear! It rained like crazy here all summer and Angelonia (one each of the 3 colors they had) still look great! I even moved them at the beginning of June because I didn't like how far back they were. No idea what it will think about being in a pot inside for winter, but nothing lost to try.

Hypoestes hasn't been mentioned here yet. A little more tricky to convince it to start from cuttings than a lot of other plants, but easy to keep alive once that hurdle's been jumped. I've come across many instances of them being kept as house plants for years on house plant forums.

If anyone has gotten 'spikes' for their pots, they should be either Dracaena or Cordyline, and can eventually turn into little trees if given a chance to escape winter.

What about the cute little globe basil? Anyone have that sneak in before?

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☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.

Garden Ideas: Level 1
sewNsow
Aug 30, 2013 5:12 PM CST
Chelle,I got a lot of new daylilies & ended up potting most.It is next to impossible to prepare the ground & plant when it is this dry.It is getting to be a chore to keep potted plants watered.I thought it was bad last year but this is worse.I was looking forward to a colorful Sept with my potted annuals but will be lucky to keep them if this drought & heat continues.
Purple,Yeah angelonia is a good one to keep over.As I mentioned in another thread,Euphorbia with tiny white flowers is another easy to start plant.You must have a shorter time to keep plants inside which is a plus.If you can keep Persian Shield over you should be able to do the other two.
sewNsow

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