Ask a Question forum: help!!!#%##%&

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Name: ken balandran
Chino (Zone 10a)
Region: California
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munozk
Aug 21, 2013 1:49 PM CST
HELP MY ORANGE BELL PEPPERS ARE ACTING WERD....I MOVED AND ALL MY PLANTS SPENT 2 HOUR IN A UHAUL...EVERTHING WAS A LITTLE SHOCKED BUT MY BELLS LOOK WORST AND WORST I PICKED THE TWO BELLS THAT WERE READY TO BE PICKED
Thumb of 2013-08-21/munozk/32edcf

Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
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woofie
Aug 21, 2013 1:54 PM CST
How long has it been since you moved them, and have you given them a chance to recover in a sheltered area?
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Aug 21, 2013 1:55 PM CST
Maybe mist them every hour or two?

Certainly give them shade and shelter from wind until they perk up.

If they are wilting, maybe trim off a few leaves to reduce transpiration, but I would only do that with diseased, yellow or curling leaves.

If the potting mix drains well, maybe flush with warm water to reduce salts and fertilizer, then give them only water or dilute fertilizer until they recover from the stress of the move.

(I assume it was really hot in the U-Haul, but they did not dry out.)

P.S. I am NO expert on peppers, so take these suggestions with some skepticism.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Aug 21, 2013 5:27 PM CST
Especially if the soil is loose, all that bouncing around in the uhaul would have broken a good portion of the root hairs, the tiny roots that do the job of water and nutrient absorption. Add to that the probable high temps inside the truck box, and you have a recipe for major plant shock. Of course, anything that is brown will never turn green again, but the best thing you can do is put them in the shade, out of wind, and water as needed. They will have to come out of it on their own, and don't expect them to look very presentable anymore, even when they are healthy and back to normalcy.
Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator I helped beta test the first seed swap Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant and/or Seed Trader Garden Ideas: Master Level Sempervivums
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valleylynn
Aug 21, 2013 8:09 PM CST
They definitely look stressed.
Name: ken balandran
Chino (Zone 10a)
Region: California
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munozk
Aug 21, 2013 8:18 PM CST
wow I no idea the bouncing around could be bad thanks .....this site it by far the best thing I ever did for my garden Group hug
Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator I helped beta test the first seed swap Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant and/or Seed Trader Garden Ideas: Master Level Sempervivums
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valleylynn
Aug 21, 2013 9:03 PM CST
Hurray! So glad you found your way here. There is so much to share and learn here at ATP. With lots of people that love doing just that. Hurray!
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Aug 22, 2013 1:00 PM CST
I forgot to say: Welcome, Ken!

>> Especially if the soil is loose, all that bouncing around in the uhaul would have broken a good portion of the root hairs,

I had never thought about that either, only the risk of branches breaking off or pot tipping over. It's a really good point.

What do you think: would shipping them moist, or dry, protect the root hairs better?
Or would that depend on the type of soil mix?

Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Aug 22, 2013 7:31 PM CST
RickCorey said:I had never thought about that either, only the risk of branches breaking off or pot tipping over....

If you train your mind to always be looking at the whole picture, as well as the individual parts, you will go far. Apply this practice in all you do, see, hear, read.... everything. It's a basic principle of clear thinking that unfortunately, not many people truly grasp.
- Gosh, that sounds like something Master Po would say on the Kung Fu TV series! Honestly though, if you do this, you will begin to notice a difference in yourself.

What do you think: would shipping them moist, or dry, protect the root hairs better?

I suppose that if one could time the plant's watering just right, so roots would be just ever so slightly dehydrated, that would give them more flexibility. Thus, less damage would occur. The concept is sometimes employed for shipping flowers that otherwise might snap during the journey. But for roots, I would wager that it would be virtually impossible to regulate the water content, so the answer is "moist". One would never want wet soil; the constant bouncing and vibration would compact the soil, and remove a lot of the tiny air spaces that are critical to plant and soil health.
Name: ken balandran
Chino (Zone 10a)
Region: California
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munozk
Aug 22, 2013 7:41 PM CST
I have them is Kellogg's patio mis...:......I trimed most of the lower leaves
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Aug 23, 2013 12:35 PM CST
>> I trimed most of the lower leaves
>> slightly dehydrated, that would give them more flexibility.
>> One would never want wet soil; the constant bouncing and vibration would compact the soil,
>> looking at the whole picture, as well as the individual parts,

I agree with all of the above.

When debugging software, or designing a system, I call that avoiding tunnel vision, thinking outside the box, or keeping an open mind. It's surprisingly hard. Almost any good idea I've had or heard at work or in the garden was accompanied by a head-smack and "DUHH! That's obvious NOW. Why didn't I think of it sooner?"

Thinking new thoughts is hard.

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