All Things Gardening forum: Tool for weeding semps. & sedums

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Name: Linda
Tennessee (Zone 7a)
Container Gardener Ferns Enjoys or suffers hot summers Canning and food preservation Cactus and Succulents Keeper of Poultry
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chickhill
Apr 20, 2014 12:54 PM CST
This is what I use for getting the tiny weeds from around, in-between semps & sedums.
Old pair of hemostat pliers. I think these are generic hemostats anyway they make excellent tool for weeding when fingers can't get in-between plants. You don't have to lock these, just grasp and pull. The grooves on blades hold weed. If you enlarge pic you can see better.
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[Last edited by chickhill - Apr 20, 2014 1:04 PM (+)]
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Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Apr 21, 2014 2:39 PM CST
>> generic hemostats
>> The grooves on blades hold weed.

Thanks for that idea! I don't usually need that much precision, but I would always appreciate a good grip on a weed.

I'll try some needle-nose Vise-Grip pliers I have. They are bigger and cheaper than hemostats, and have very deeply grooved gripping surfaces. I can even "dial in" a specific gap between the jaws so I don't just cut the root where I grip it.

Thumb of 2014-04-21/RickCorey/7eaeee

http://www.amazon.com/Irwin-Tools-1602L3-Orignal-Locking/dp/...

I must have bought mine at Harbor Freight many years ago: I wouldn't have paid a whole $6 for that!

My favorite weeding tool for big weeds with deep roots is a spike bayonet. It can be plunged deeply into hard rocky soil without much force, then "swizzled around" in a circle so the whole root pops out like an apple core after using a corer.

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[Last edited by RickCorey - Apr 21, 2014 2:46 PM (+)]
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Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Apr 21, 2014 2:45 PM CST
That would probably work for moss as well. I just spent a lot of time trying to pry out some stray grass that was growing in an established mat of Scotch moss. Took forever, and some I just gave a close haircut to knowing they will grow back.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Linda
Tennessee (Zone 7a)
Container Gardener Ferns Enjoys or suffers hot summers Canning and food preservation Cactus and Succulents Keeper of Poultry
Garden Art Butterflies Sempervivums Sedums Hummingbirder Hostas
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chickhill
Apr 21, 2014 9:59 PM CST
They really work great like on the Tricolor without tearing off leaves like my fingers did.

I also use a huge-long screwdriver (17") for popping out dandelion, violets, and wild onions.
[Last edited by chickhill - May 1, 2014 9:13 PM (+)]
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Name: Wes
Ohio (Zone 6a)
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Wes
Apr 30, 2014 10:00 PM CST
Great ideas and I just so happen to have all 3 of those improvised gardening tools at my disposal!

Just never considered their use in the garden tool kit. I do keep pliers in the arsenal, from bending/snipping wire to tightening shears and loppers. Gardening for a living I like to keep as much as possible in "the bucket" to avoid trips to the truck.

Another "must have" for working with plastic tarps (especially on windy days or working alone) are the plastic and steel Coleman tent stakes. No more fly-away tarps! One recommended improvement is to hit them with some hi-vis paint. These would also likely serve as the spike bayonet does giving them a bonus feature. Sturdy and reasonably priced too.


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Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
May 1, 2014 4:19 PM CST
Those might be better than my spike bayonet: lighter and the handle looks comfortable.

But mine will NEVER bend!

(Zone 6a)
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Celene
May 4, 2014 7:45 PM CST
FWIW, I use straight forceps for planting and fiddling with leaves, including minor pruning, and curved forceps for weeding, they just seem easier for me. I use Crile forceps. I also use serrated bandage scissors for some cutting jobs--cutting a plastic pot off of a rootbound plant, opening bags, etc. They're not my first choice for actual bandage, but I like them for gardening (and clipping bird wings).

I also like this gigantor screwdriver that my father gave me, I use it for weeding or miscellaneous prying or hole-poking.

I use a basket made for silverware for my smallish hand tools--Sharpie marker, chopsticks, forceps, pen knife, etc.
Name: Linda
Tennessee (Zone 7a)
Container Gardener Ferns Enjoys or suffers hot summers Canning and food preservation Cactus and Succulents Keeper of Poultry
Garden Art Butterflies Sempervivums Sedums Hummingbirder Hostas
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chickhill
May 4, 2014 10:28 PM CST
I agree
My yard is now dandelion and wild onion free thanks to my giant (17") screwdriver. Only found 2 dandelions yesterday. Hurray!
Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
May 5, 2014 11:58 AM CST
@Chickhill, that's impressive. I can't even imagine a dandelion free lawn. I figure I'm on a roll if I can keep the blossoms mowed often enough so they don't set seed (twice last week). If not (this week promises only rainy days), then I just enjoy my jolly yellow meadow.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Linda
Tennessee (Zone 7a)
Container Gardener Ferns Enjoys or suffers hot summers Canning and food preservation Cactus and Succulents Keeper of Poultry
Garden Art Butterflies Sempervivums Sedums Hummingbirder Hostas
Image
chickhill
May 5, 2014 1:48 PM CST
Bonehead Thank You! I have a very small yard. For years I spot sprayed & of course killed the whole area. So I started about a month ago every morning w/ my trusty monster screwdriver. I lost count on how many 5 gal. buckets we popped out. Hubby did get in on the act also. Today I found one. We're both retired and I do what I love playing, planting, moving, dividing, sharing, trading and of course having a Flower Yard Sale. Maybe I will get to do the violets, wild strawberries and plantain. Shrug!
I am Blessed Hurray!



Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
Bonehead
May 5, 2014 2:02 PM CST
Well that makes more sense. I have a large and rambling yard with fluid boundaries - depending on who is mowing. I could spend from now to eternity trying to rid the lawn of dandelions, but by the time I got one section done, they'd just be colonizing in another. I rather like them.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
(Zone 6a)
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Celene
May 5, 2014 6:15 PM CST
I leave dandelions for bee food. Not that I don't have plenty in my beds, just not this early.
Name: Linda
Tennessee (Zone 7a)
Container Gardener Ferns Enjoys or suffers hot summers Canning and food preservation Cactus and Succulents Keeper of Poultry
Garden Art Butterflies Sempervivums Sedums Hummingbirder Hostas
Image
chickhill
May 5, 2014 7:02 PM CST
I tip my hat to you. I have quite a bit of clover for the honey bees Group hug
(Zone 6a)
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Celene
May 11, 2014 7:34 PM CST
Clover is def nicer than dandelions. Now I can kill them without guilt.
Name: Karen
Baltimore, MD (Zone 7b)
typwc
May 13, 2014 10:09 AM CST
I am a dandelion hater too. However, my heart was *slightly* softened as I was watching goldfinches pick the seeds off the fluffy heads the other morning. I didn't know goldfinches did that.
Name: Linda
Tennessee (Zone 7a)
Container Gardener Ferns Enjoys or suffers hot summers Canning and food preservation Cactus and Succulents Keeper of Poultry
Garden Art Butterflies Sempervivums Sedums Hummingbirder Hostas
Image
chickhill
May 13, 2014 10:54 AM CST
I don't really hate them. I would prefer them to not be in my yard. I had one area that was covered and spreading so they are gone along with the green onions. My niece made jelly one year from dandelions.

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