All Things Gardening forum: Too much rain, more on the way

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Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Apr 27, 2014 10:58 AM CST
My garden has had so much rain the surface is starting to grow a white fungus, ...not sure that is the proper term. It is especially noticeable where the worms have worked hard and left their castings. Anyone know for sure what this is, is it bad, good or indifferent to the health of the garden?
Thumb of 2014-04-27/Seedfork/4228e4
Thumb of 2014-04-27/Seedfork/14151f

Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
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abhege
Apr 29, 2014 8:01 PM CST
Seed, I don't know the answer to your question but i feel for you. We have had a lot of rain as well and I am having a hard time getting my vegetables planted because I cannot get the field to dry out enough to work in.

Hopefully someone else can answer your question.
Name: Horseshoe Griffin
Efland, NC (Zone 7a)
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Horseshoe
Apr 30, 2014 1:09 PM CST
I wouldn't worry about it at all, Seedfork. That is normal and is just fungus mycelium doing what they do best, helping to break down organic matter and adding a bit of life to your soil. No worries.

Shoe (like Abhege, surrounded by rainstorms)
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Apr 30, 2014 1:24 PM CST
Horseshoe,
Thanks, I appreciate that. I was hoping for it to be something good and not bad.
Name: David Paul
(Zone 9b)
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DavidofDeLand
Apr 30, 2014 3:44 PM CST
Fungicide needed soon. Smiling

Whats your favorite less invasive and edible mix? Baking soda and Milk with a drop of soap maybe on veggies? I use the hardcore stuff on my ornamentals *Blush* to maintain their beauty Lovey dubby
Name: Horseshoe Griffin
Efland, NC (Zone 7a)
And in the end...a happy beginning!
Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Garden Sages I sent a postcard to Randy! I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
For our friend, Shoe. Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Enjoys or suffers cold winters Birds Permaculture Container Gardener
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Horseshoe
Apr 30, 2014 6:28 PM CST
"Fungicide needed soon"

Nope, David, this is not the kind of fungus to worry about. This is an extremely beneficial fungus that really contributes to soil growth, or rather the life in the soil. I understand though that most folks hear the word "fungus" and assume it is always a detriment.

Shoe (who probably should wash his bare feet this week to halt fungal growth :>)
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
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abhege
Apr 30, 2014 7:12 PM CST
Hilarious! Hilarious! what an image I got from that, Shoe! Hilarious!
Name: Horseshoe Griffin
Efland, NC (Zone 7a)
And in the end...a happy beginning!
Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Garden Sages I sent a postcard to Randy! I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
For our friend, Shoe. Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Enjoys or suffers cold winters Birds Permaculture Container Gardener
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Horseshoe
Apr 30, 2014 7:16 PM CST
Heheheh...*grinnin' here.
I guess you do your time w/barefeet, eh? Ya gotta love it!

Hope all is well down your way. Hope you get in that garden soon.

Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
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abhege
Apr 30, 2014 7:46 PM CST
No bare feet here, too many fire ants.

Wind is really kicking up right now but i'm hoping to get my peppers in this weekend, then i'll worry about cules, squash and melon. And more corn.
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
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RickCorey
Apr 30, 2014 8:10 PM CST
Some people refuse to till because it will disturb the soil fungi.

My theory is that fungi are not differentiated organisms (except when fruiting). They are multicellular, but they reproduce from fragments of hyphae. So I don't see why tilling would bother them even if individual fungal hyphae spread out over several feet (or mm? or yards?) in undisturbed soil. ten small small chunks of fungal hyphae ought to be able to do anything that one hunk ten times its size could do.

The individual fungus cells are tiny. They might be bothered if a Roto-Tiller operated like a food blender on "puree", but I think a Roto-Tiller only chops soil into peds larger than 1/4". A plow or fork turns up clods measured in inches.

But I'm no expert on soil mycology OR no-till theory. At home, I use a trenching shovel and fork when the clay elluviates into an impenetrable layer 12" down. Lately, my better beds haven't needed that.

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