Dulwich Park - A Queens Park but Not a Royal Park (Part 2): virtual tour

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Dulwich Park - A Queens Park but Not a Royal Park (Part 2)

By NEILMUIR1
May 20, 2010

Dulwich Park is famous for its Rhododendrons and Azaleas in May, but there is a lot more to this wonderful place than that. Its wildfowl and wildlife abound; it is managed with the environment in mind, proving an area of outstanding beauty and historical interest can be a place for everyone as well!

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Name: Lucy
Hamilton, MA (Zone 6b)
irises
Charter ATP Member Cottage Gardener Enjoys or suffers cold winters Region: United Kingdom Region: Northeast US Irises
Region: United States of America
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irisarian
May 19, 2010 9:27 PM CST
I skipped the tennis courts--too far to walk. It was fun however. Great fun, Neil.
Name: Neil
London\Kent Border
Forum moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level Tip Photographer I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Charter ATP Member Region: United Kingdom
Ferns Native Plants and Wildflowers Seed Starter Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters The WITWIT Badge
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NEILMUIR1
May 19, 2010 11:36 PM CST
Dear Lucy, thank you for your comments and on my Article there were some Iris!
Regards.
Neil.
Name: Cherie (Cece) Coogan
Southeastern WI zone 5a (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member
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cececoogan
May 20, 2010 5:15 AM CST
Awesome as always dear Neil. Thank you.. I love seeing the world from the comfort of my home.

Neil could tell me why the varigaed iris and Marsh marigold seemed to be in cages?
the faster I go, the behinder I get
Name: Neil
London\Kent Border
Forum moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level Tip Photographer I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Charter ATP Member Region: United Kingdom
Ferns Native Plants and Wildflowers Seed Starter Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters The WITWIT Badge
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NEILMUIR1
May 20, 2010 5:32 AM CST
Dear Cherie, there are a lot of Wildfowl that use the plants for nesting! There is also a lot of Red Foxes and crows. So to protect the plants and the wildfowl from damage this is done, it gives the wildfowl a chance when they have eggs in a nest. For if you look at the picture of the two Drakes together the water is very shallow. A red Fox would go straight through that and raid a nest or eat the young or worse kill the parents. Also with some plants you don't want the wildfowl in, as they can damage them too much, so that can stop them and give them a chance.
Hope that sums it up for you, although you do not get the trouble with red Foxes we do here. They are not liked by most of us as they kill for pleasure, not to eat. If they get in a chicken run they go into a frenzy and will kill every single chicken, but never eat one, just blood lust! They do the same with new born lambs and no one can understand why they do it.
Crows are clever and magpies, jays as well, They will raid nay birds nest for the eggs, which is not good if you are trying to look after wildfowl.
Regards.
Neil.
Name: Cherie (Cece) Coogan
Southeastern WI zone 5a (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member
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cececoogan
May 20, 2010 5:38 AM CST
Yeah red foxes aren't a problem in Waukesha, but raccoons can be problem Thanks for clearing that up for me.
the faster I go, the behinder I get

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