Ask a Question forum: Morning Glories

Views: 466, Replies: 6 » Jump to the end
Name: Peggy Wright
Northeast Texas (Zone 8a)
Elderly female
peggypj
Jul 12, 2014 12:05 PM CST
The morning glories that I transplanted are blooming beautifully.
The morning glories planted from seed are healthy but not blooming.
Any idea why they are not blooming?
TexasGranny
Name: Anne
Summerville, SC (Zone 8a)
Be a voice - not an echo!
Plant and/or Seed Trader Enjoys or suffers cold winters Hybridizer Birds Seed Starter Cat Lover
Pollen collector Morning Glories Greenhouse Bookworm Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages
Image
Xeramtheum
Jul 12, 2014 12:15 PM CST
Hi Peggy and welcome to ATP!

I'm experiencing the same problem with my MG's they are blooming very sporadically when they should be blooming their heads off by now. I feed and water them regularly and I don't have a clue as to what's going on.
"We were all humans until race disconnected us, religion separated us, politics divided us and wealth classified us."

Unknown

Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
Jul 12, 2014 5:30 PM CST
Peggy, do I understand that you started some MG's from seed in the ground outside, and also started some indoors in potting soil and transplanted them outside? Or did you buy transplants?

Just guessing here, but the transplants might just have stronger root systems since potting medium is lighter and possibly was warmer than the soil outside. This might give them a head start, even allowing for transplant shock. (you must have done a great job of transplanting) If you bought the transplants, they might have been going a little longer than the seed started plants.

The other thing that can boost plants into blooming is a bit of stress. Maybe the transplanting was the little bit of stress those plants needed to get flowers starting. If you can stand to 'stress' the other plants by witholding water for a day or two, that might give them a kick. Let them dry out really well, but not wilt.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
Image
woofie
Jul 12, 2014 7:43 PM CST
And are they different species of morning glories? I. purpurea typically will bloom sooner than I. nils and I. tricolor. At least, that has been my experience here.
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Peggy Wright
Northeast Texas (Zone 8a)
Elderly female
peggypj
Jul 12, 2014 8:56 PM CST
Thank you very much for your reply.
The blooming morning glory transplants came from the man who mows for me. I'm not sure of the species.
I will ask how he started them. The flowers are a beautiful dark purple.

The seeds were Ferry-Morse (1) Scarlet O'Hara (2) Grandpa Ott and (3) Heavenly Blue (Ipomoea Tricolor).
I started the seeds indoors with bottom warmth then put them outside.
I have fertilizer sticks I could use if recommended.
Meanwhile, I will enjoy what I have.
TexasGranny
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
Image
woofie
Jul 12, 2014 10:15 PM CST
Well, looks like in your seeds, you have one of each! Scarlet O'Hara is an I. nil, Grandpa Ott is an I. purpurea, and Heavenly Blue is an I. tricolor. Heavenly Blues hate me. I try starting them indoors and they all seem to die when I plant them out. Sigh. My understanding is that it's only I. nils that like to be fertilized, but I could be wrong about that. I'd always heard that if you fertilize other morning glories, you get lots of leaves and not a lot of flowers.
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: mj
Central Florida
Butterflies Hummingbirder Keeps Horses Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Plant and/or Seed Trader Region: Florida
Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
mjsponies
Jul 13, 2014 6:25 AM CST
woofie said:And are they different species of morning glories? I. purpurea typically will bloom sooner than I. nils and I. tricolor. At least, that has been my experience here.


What woofie said.

Night temperature differences can make a difference also. Many plants, not just Morning glories will bloom less or even not at all when night time temps are higher. Our night time temps here have been around 78- 80º,. Don't know what yours have been but that might be having an influence.

God gave us wings. He just called them horses

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by Baja_Costero and is called "Agave"