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As a comment about English Daisy (Bellis perennis), Bonehead wrote:

Introduced from Europe, is now widely established and has become naturalized in the Pacific Northwest. I have several happy colonies coexisting in my front lawn. Mowing just seems to bring on more flowers. Named after the Belides, one of whom died in fear of Vertumnus, the god of spring, and sank to the earth in the form of a daisy. Mine range from white to hot pink.
Name: BrendaVR
Ontario, Canada (Zone 6a)
Dragonflies Butterflies Region: Canadian
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BrendaVR
Aug 2, 2014 9:30 AM CST
The comment "Introduced from Europe, is now widely established and included as a native plant in the Pacific Northwest" is contradictory. An introduced species is NEVER NATIVE. Never can be no mater how long its established or widespread it is....

See the Wiki definition: "In biogeography, a species is defined as native (or indigenous) to a given region or ecosystem if its presence in that region is the result of only natural processes, with no human intervention."

You may mean "naturalized" which means the plant is now widespread and reproducing on its own in the wild, after its introduction.

Many do consider it invasive in the USA http://www.invasive.org/browse/subinfo.cfm?sub=5178
If we had no holes in our leaves we would have no butterflies!
[Last edited by BrendaVR - Aug 2, 2014 9:31 AM (+)]
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Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Aug 4, 2014 8:26 AM CST
I have often seen it in lists of PNW native plants made by various agencies. I don't make those decisions. I have no objection to changing my comment to indicate it has become naturalized (and will do so). To my knowledge, it is not an invasive in the PNW although it may be in other places.

(Please don't yell, no need for the bold and caps...)
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: BrendaVR
Ontario, Canada (Zone 6a)
Dragonflies Butterflies Region: Canadian
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BrendaVR
Aug 4, 2014 10:40 AM CST
Was not intended as a 'yell' just as am emphasis of the main point. (Either its native, or its introduced. Cannot be both. A strange new misconception otherwise is a pet peeve of mine and the original phrasing seemed to perpetuate that misconception....couldn't not comment) I apologize for pouncing a bit hard.

In regards to this specific plant I am not an expert but I like your current edit better. The one exception to its native/introduced status is likely an error as most research states it is from Europe.
If we had no holes in our leaves we would have no butterflies!
[Last edited by BrendaVR - Aug 4, 2014 10:40 AM (+)]
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Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Aug 4, 2014 10:51 AM CST
No worries, I am always open to corrections for accuracy. I did note that my most used reference book is titled "Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast" which does not necessarily mean all plants included are native to the region. I will be more cautious in the future. I've always known this little plant as 'lawn daisy' as opposed to 'English daisy' which likely contributed to my error.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.

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