Daylilies forum: Hairy Growth on Daylilies

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Name: Karen
Minnesota (Zone 4a)
Region: Minnesota Garden Art Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Cookies4kids
Aug 16, 2014 2:30 PM CST
I suppose that sounds a little strange, but that's what it looks like. I am wondering why it is that when I divide plants, some of them have all this fine, hairy fiber like growth at the base of the stalks. Is that caused by too much mulch around the plant, or is it just the nature of the beast for some plants?? Should that be removed before replanting or just left as is??
Thanks!!
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Name: Cynthia (Cindy)
Melvindale, Mi (Zone 5b)
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Hemlady
Aug 16, 2014 2:53 PM CST
If I am getting what you are describing it could be those very fine roots. If not, I do know what you mean but I think that is just common to daylilies. I don't think it is anything to worry about.
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Aug 16, 2014 3:26 PM CST
Do you mean the stringy bits to the left of and around this rather disreputable looking winter (November) dormant bud?

Thumb of 2014-08-16/sooby/7c0cbd

If so it's the remains of the old outer leaves, I assume the vascular tissue after the in between bits have been eaten or rotted away.

Name: Karen
Minnesota (Zone 4a)
Region: Minnesota Garden Art Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Cookies4kids
Aug 16, 2014 6:16 PM CST
Thanks but that's really not it. It is really thick at the base of the stem and hard to pull out. It looks like fine hairs but there is a thick mat of it all around the stem.
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Name: Ken
Traverse City, Michigan (Zone 5a)
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bramedog
Aug 16, 2014 6:40 PM CST
Hmm... got a photo you can post?
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Aug 16, 2014 6:44 PM CST
The remains of the old leaves can look thicker and finer than in the picture. In the picture the plant had been underground dormant when I dug it up (spring sickness investigation), and I had washed it to get a good look at everything, so the fibers are wet changing the appearance, but it was the only pic I could find that showed them. You mention it is around the stem/stalks. Do you mean it is only around the flower scapes? I agree, a picture would definitely help.
Name: Karen
Minnesota (Zone 4a)
Region: Minnesota Garden Art Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Cookies4kids
Aug 16, 2014 6:49 PM CST
I can't a pic right now but will in the future. I just finished getting ready for my big fall sale so everything is cleaned up.
Thanks for trying to help.
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Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Aug 17, 2014 5:56 AM CST
Cookies4kids,
I think I know what you are talking about, when I move daylilies I often see this, but I am not really sure it is part of the plant. I always clean that stuff off before planting, and I actually think that is could be fine root material from other plants. Does that make sense? I can just pull the fine fiberous looking stuff away from the plant, leaving a nice clean plant to be planted.Do you have any type of invasive plants that grow in your daylily beds? I always envision those fine roots as invasive weeds trying to get established in my garden and I try my best to remove them all, but that is based on no fact at all. That stuff could be part of the daylily plants, but as you say some have it and some don't.
Name: Julie
Roanoke, VA (Zone 7a)
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floota
Aug 17, 2014 7:15 AM CST
I've mostly seen this fibrous stuff in plants that really need to be divided. It can be pulled away when plants are divided. IMHO, it is just the remains of old leaves that have died back. Doesn't worry me and has never caused a problem.

Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
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dyzzypyxxy
Aug 17, 2014 8:32 AM CST
I agree with Julie, just went out to see if I could find that plant that had a tuft of fiber-y stuff. When I was pulling off some spent leaves, they left long hairy fibers around the base.

Mine are all new plantings so don't have much, but a big clump in the spring can have big hairy tufts.
Thumb of 2014-08-17/dyzzypyxxy/dd6b7d Thumb of 2014-08-17/dyzzypyxxy/36f31e

Elaine

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Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Aug 17, 2014 10:13 AM CST
No matter what it is, I always like to clean the daylilies really well when I am transplanting plants from other gardens into mine. I have sometimes skipped that step and lived to regret it by importing invasive plants. I also learned to make sure to clean any potted daylilies brought in, nut grass is often mixed in with the roots.
Name: Karen
Minnesota (Zone 4a)
Region: Minnesota Garden Art Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Cookies4kids
Aug 17, 2014 12:50 PM CST
Thanks so much. That is exactly what I am talking. When you pull all that away, you have a nice clean plant. I was thinking it might be that the plants need to be divided. It seems that some plants are just more susceptible to this also. I also find none of this in plants that are easy to divide, and just fall apart easily. Those that are in tight, hard to seperate clumps almost always have this mess to clean off. As long as I know it isn't harmful, I am ok with it.
Thanks so much.
Happiness is doing for those who cannot do for themselves.

Weedyseedy
Sep 12, 2014 7:16 PM CST
I dug up a seedling from about 2000 that is completely dormant and all the foliage dies back forming a mass of fiber. Hoping I can get a Spring picture posted and today's photo. This one was lined out two or three years ago and already needed dividing--should have had a knife to split it as these clumps are so tight.-Weedy
Thumb of 2014-09-13/Weedyseedy/7b7a77


Thumb of 2014-09-13/Weedyseedy/1f0b52


Thumb of 2014-09-13/Weedyseedy/fd61a5


Thumb of 2014-09-13/Weedyseedy/57ad54

Name: Karen
Minnesota (Zone 4a)
Region: Minnesota Garden Art Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Cookies4kids
Sep 12, 2014 7:22 PM CST
That's it, Weedy. Thanks so much.
Happiness is doing for those who cannot do for themselves.
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Sep 13, 2014 7:07 AM CST
Weedyseedy,
Did you just dig that plant up Sept. 12th of this year? You said it was completely dormant, so it was in summer dormancy? I have just been complaining about that in another thread. This caught my attention, and I am wondering if there is any connection between plants that experience summer dormancy and all the hairy (dead leaf) appearance. I am sort of wondering if all that dead leaf material contributes to the plants being so tight and hard to separate, or if the plant being so hard to separate contributes to the hairy looking appearance.
It seems reasonable that if a plant is root bound so to speak that the leaves might start dying off. I can see that if a plant experiences a summer dormancy if it is an (evergreen) it would have more dead leaf material than an evergreen that did not experience summer dormancy.

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