Daylilies forum: Arrow in all directions

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Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
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needrain
Sep 5, 2014 9:24 AM CST
Up and down and all around. Is this what is meant when the term 'movement' is applied to a daylily bloom? Or does it refer to the bloom actually moving in the breeze? Anyway, Green Arrow was fun with each new bloom. The green didn't fade much either, which is saying a lot with the Texas sun here. Photos were from June 2014.
Thumb of 2014-09-05/needrain/a38e55

Donald
Name: Pat
Near McIntosh, Florida (Zone 9a)
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Xenacrockett
Sep 5, 2014 12:55 PM CST
I agree
Name: Char
Vermont (Zone 4b)
Daylilies Forum moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Region: Vermont
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Char
Sep 5, 2014 5:54 PM CST

Moderator

Great color on Green Arrow, the green really stands out. Thumbs up I can just imagine a clump with all the blooms moving in different directions, keeps you wanting to see more!
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
Image
needrain
Sep 7, 2014 8:14 PM CST
Thanks, everyone, for the thumbs. But no one has really addressed the question about movement. I've thought about starting a thread called 'Dumb Daylily Questions' where this might have gone. It just seemed a series of photos showing Green Arrow doing calisthenics would be more fun. Also, all my questions would probably get asked and answered before I could absorb and retain them, so I decided a slower approach would probably work better. There's a lot of daylily terminology bandied about that is unfamiliar to me. I've looked up some and now I've accumulated some to use, but there's a lot - make that LOT! - that I'm unsure about and some I've looked up haven't stuck yet. So is 'movement' a style of bloom, or an actual event due to the structure of the bloom? Just wait 'til I ask for clarification of 'chicken fat' Smiling .
Donald
[Last edited by needrain - Sep 8, 2014 7:27 AM (+)]
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Name: Char
Vermont (Zone 4b)
Daylilies Forum moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Region: Vermont
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Char
Sep 8, 2014 7:08 AM CST

Moderator

Up and down and all around is a good way to describe "movement".
I could not find an official definition for "movement" even after reading through several highly possible sources so will give you my best understanding of the term.
Movement is the appearance that the bloom is in motion even when it is not being moved by a separate force. Twisting, curling, pinching and irregularly placed segments of the Unusual and Spider forms give the illusion the blooms are moving even if there is no breeze. Along with following the definitions and requirements for registration of Unusual and Spider forms, a sense of movement can be a desired characteristic that separates these two forms from the round (bagel) subform.

Your image above and these from the database all show a sense of motion in the blooms...






If anyone would care to correct or add to what I wrote it might help all of us to understand movement better Smiling
Name: Glen Ingram
Macleay Is, Qld, Australia (Zone 12a)
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Gleni
Sep 8, 2014 7:24 AM CST
That is interesting Char. Thank You!
Name: Donald
Eastland county, Texas (Zone 8a)
Region: Texas Enjoys or suffers hot summers Raises cows Plant Identifier
Image
needrain
Sep 8, 2014 7:24 AM CST
"Movement is the appearance that the bloom is in motion even when it is not being moved by a separate force. Twisting, curling, pinching and irregularly placed segments of the Unusual and Spider forms give the illusion the blooms are moving even if there is no breeze." - Char

That's a great description. AHS should adopt it and make it official. It describes my current take, but originally I thought movement was really wiggly movement due to the loose and long structure of the bloom which doesn't occur with bagel types.
Donald
[Last edited by needrain - Sep 8, 2014 7:25 AM (+)]
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Name: Teresa
South central KY (Zone 6b)
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bluegrassmom
Sep 8, 2014 2:31 PM CST
I love the ones that look like they are in motion. My favorite in my garden is Painted Pinwheel.
Name: Char
Vermont (Zone 4b)
Daylilies Forum moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Region: Vermont
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Char
Sep 8, 2014 5:52 PM CST

Moderator

I almost used Painted Pinwheel as one of the examples. The images in the database show some serious petal and sepal action going on!

Weedyseedy
Sep 9, 2014 10:24 AM CST
Years ago I had a self sown seedling that someone described as having "movement". Like a lot of my plants it's lost in the chaos here, but I still have a photo-somewhere-and I may find the plant some year. Dumb thing always fell over too, but it grew in the shade.
Thumb of 2014-09-09/Weedyseedy/3df016


Thumb of 2014-09-09/Weedyseedy/2aa41f

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