Plant ID forum: Crinum (Crinum x powellii)

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Name: Michael Hamilton
Corpus Christi, TX (Zone 9b)
Region: Texas Hibiscus Plumerias Cactus and Succulents
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Blondmyk
Oct 2, 2014 12:17 PM CST
We have a LOT of these growing around our house. I've been planting them, moving them around, and just generally having fun landscaping with them. When left alone, they grow to be 3-4 foot tall, and the blade like leaves on them can be up to 24"-36" long...just really long leaves. I'm providing a photo of the flowers and wondering if it's a Crinum Lily or a variety of Amaryllis? I don't know why, but I always thought it was Amaryllis Belladonna? Thank you all so much for your time!!


[Last edited by Blondmyk - Oct 2, 2014 12:19 PM (+)]
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Name: Michael Hamilton
Corpus Christi, TX (Zone 9b)
Region: Texas Hibiscus Plumerias Cactus and Succulents
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Blondmyk
Oct 2, 2014 12:23 PM CST
Oh yes, one more thing. The foliage seems to be evergreen down here in South TX. A stalk grows next to the plant with these flowers. Probably important stuff to know...Thanks again!
Name: Jean
Prairieville, LA (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier The WITWIT Badge Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Moonhowl
Oct 2, 2014 12:39 PM CST
Give these links a look. Pictures of both to compare. I am a bit more familiar with Crinums than Amaryllis and know that some crinums are evergreen in my garden.


http://pacificbulbsociety.org/pbswiki/index.php/Amaryllis


http://www.onalee.com/catalog.php/onaleeisrael/dt66040/pd174...
Name: Dave Paul
Puna, HI (Zone 10b)
Live in a rainforest, get wet feet.
Plant Identifier
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Metrosideros
Oct 2, 2014 1:46 PM CST
Maybe Crinum x powellii.

https://www.google.com/images?q=Crinum+x+powellii&rls=com.mi...

http://www.floridata.com/ref/c/crin_xpo.cfm

https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/90456/Swamp-lily/Details
Name: Michael Hamilton
Corpus Christi, TX (Zone 9b)
Region: Texas Hibiscus Plumerias Cactus and Succulents
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Blondmyk
Oct 2, 2014 2:56 PM CST
I do believe that we've got an ID. I'm 99.99 percent sure that this is the "Pass-along-Pink" Crinum Lily. Wow...thank you so very much. Everything I looked at with that one led me to be convinced that was what it was. Even the size of the bulb in the description seemed correct, along with the description of the young that grow along the sides of the plants that I never mentioned. You know, before I came to this site this week I never even knew what a Crinum Lily was...

Thanks again Everyone for your assistance! Hurray!
[Last edited by Blondmyk - Oct 2, 2014 2:59 PM (+)]
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Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
Region: United States of America Morning Glories Region: Florida Houseplants Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
Oct 2, 2014 3:18 PM CST
I too agree with the ID of a Crinum; it reminds me a lot of Crinum (Crinum x powellii)
~ Eat, Sleep .... Play in the dirt ~
Name: Jean
Prairieville, LA (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier The WITWIT Badge Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Moonhowl
Oct 2, 2014 10:23 PM CST
Happy to help . Crinums are just so cool. They do belong to the Amaryllis family, so that and lead to a bit of confusion as to which plant they are.

I have loved Crinums since my Mother-in-law asked my husband to please come help his dad dig up the ones in her yard. That was 40 years ago and it took us a weekend to coax and cajole 30 bulbs and their Mother from the ground. They are Crinum asiaticum, Giant Spider Lily. My father-in-law did admit (with a bit of a grin) that a few would disappear every now and then. They were there when my in-laws bought the house...planted over an old septic tank.

The Mother bulb was huge...weighed in at about 14-15 pounds after we washed away the soil. Since then, I have continued to pass them along. Smiling
Name: Michael Hamilton
Corpus Christi, TX (Zone 9b)
Region: Texas Hibiscus Plumerias Cactus and Succulents
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Blondmyk
Oct 5, 2014 8:57 AM CST
I cannot even imagine a 15 lb bulb! Holy Toledo!

The ones that I have around my apartment and in my backyard are huge plants, in my opinion, for being bulbs. I've seen Amaryllis bulbs and consider those to be large. You said that yours, Moonhowl, are considered Giant Spider Lilies? I can't imagine larger than these that I have out here now...so Wow! Would LOVE to see one of those. I'm going to go now and see if you've posted any photos of them!

Closing off the thread now as solved. Thanks again to everyone...you all have been so very helpful!
Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
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CaliFlowers
Oct 5, 2015 1:43 PM CST
Going by the height given, and appearance of the flower, there's a possibility that it could be Crinum moorei.
Crinum moorei has an interesting growth cycle here, where the foliage languishes during the heat of the late summer for a short time, then new leaves appear with the fall rains, followed by, or sometimes concurrent with, blooming stems. (Are they properly called scapes in Crinum?) I have several plants of moorei, one of which was passed along by a certified "Master Gardener" with a tag which said "Naked Lady" (a common name for Amaryllis belladonna, which it is obviously not.)

One distinguishing characteristic of moorei is the leaf, which is generally upright, but then relaxes mid-length. It's also keeled, with a prominent midrib when viewed from the underside. It can also exhibit a subtle pattern or texture of "netting". The powelii types have a broad, U-profile leaf, which is long, smooth, and recurves to the ground. Here, these tend to bloom in the spring-summer.

Ken

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