Roses forum: Planting grafted roses: above or below soil line?

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Name: Annie
Waynesboro, PA (Zone 6a)
Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry
Jan 2, 2015 11:21 AM CST
I have always been told to plant grafted roses so that the union (where graft meets scion) is about 2 inches ABOVE the soil line. But I recently was told that the proper way to plant a grafted rose is with the union well BELOW the soil line. Which is correct? Does it matter? I garden in Zone 6.
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Name: Patty W
La Salle Illinois (Zone 5a)
Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Jan 2, 2015 1:32 PM CST
Below ground protects the rose graft from freeze damage. Paul Zimmerman in a warmer zone then yours recommends planting below ground. He has a video on this at -
Name: Toni
Denver Metro (Zone 5a)
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.
Charter ATP Member Irises Salvias Xeriscape Birds I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Procrastinator The WITWIT Badge Region: Colorado Enjoys or suffers cold winters Cat Lover
Jan 2, 2015 1:46 PM CST
Annie - As someone who kills roses on a regular basis, I always plant mine BELOW the soil line. As deep as I possibly can (depends on how lazy I am as to how deep I dig the hole). Plus I always mulch on top of that for winter protection. And I'm zone 5 (sometimes zone 4, depending on the winter.. this has been a colder winter for us).
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Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses
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Jan 2, 2015 2:15 PM CST


It's only in the warmest zones that the graft union is kept two inches above ground level.

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