Ask a Question forum: Re: bulbs called fritillaria uva-vulpis (also called snakeshead lily)

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Name: Jane
Tobyhanna, PA (Zone 5a)
The "Garden" is my Happy Place!
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PAgirl63
Jan 4, 2015 2:59 PM CST
I bought a package of these small spring flowering bulbs and planted them in late Fall. From the photo on the package, they produce small bell-shaped purple and yellow flowers above foliage about 6-12 inches in height. I thought they would look pretty in front of a staggered row of taller yellow daffodils. Does anyone know if they are deer resistent? The deer don't touch daffodils, but I don't know if they will chomp down on these. Thanks for any info.
Janie


*** Correction - they are NOT called snakeshead lily. ***

[Last edited by PAgirl63 - Jan 4, 2015 3:16 PM (+)]
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Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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woofie
Jan 4, 2015 3:17 PM CST
Well, according to one vendor, at least, they are supposed not to be attractive to either rabbits or deer. They are very cute!
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Jane
Tobyhanna, PA (Zone 5a)
The "Garden" is my Happy Place!
Garden Ideas: Master Level
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PAgirl63
Jan 4, 2015 4:40 PM CST

Thanks, woofie. The deer or the groundhogs eat just about everything else!

Jane Thank You!
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
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woofie
Jan 4, 2015 4:50 PM CST
Another source indicates that they are poisonous. And many sources indicate that the bulbs should be planted on their sides.
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Jane
Tobyhanna, PA (Zone 5a)
The "Garden" is my Happy Place!
Garden Ideas: Master Level
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PAgirl63
Jan 4, 2015 5:06 PM CST

woofie, I do remember reading somewhere about planting them on their sides. I'd read that AFTER I'd planted them. If they are poisonous, that should deter just about anything from eating them.
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
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woofie
Jan 4, 2015 5:25 PM CST
Next year, maybe? Hilarious!
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Jan 4, 2015 5:49 PM CST
I wouldn't put too much stock in those animal resistant reports. Many species of Frits are reported to be stinky, including F. uva-vulpis, but that hasn't kept rodents away in my experience. I've grown F. uva-vulpis from bulbs bought at a nursery like the bag you show. Myself, I never noticed any odor. I can't say particularly about the uva-vulpis species, but many species of fritillaria were eaten by indigenous peoples. The whole idea of planting the bulb on its side is purportedly to keep water from pooling withn the scales in an upright bulb. In the long run, it is a silly notion, as any bulb will right itself, usually in a year's time. However, for newly planted bulbs where a pocket of disturbed soil may produce a temporary (say 4 month) bathtub effect, there could be an advantage. Planting on its side certainly won't hurt anything. Fritillaria uva-vulpis is from Turkey/Iraq/Iran, so put it in a place that stays dried in summer when it is dormant, and the more summer heat, the better. Rich soil is not necessary.
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
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woofie
Jan 4, 2015 6:28 PM CST
Well, I didn't actually see any claims about the bulbs being rodent resistant, unless you consider rabbits to be rodents. Hilarious!
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
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Leftwood
Jan 4, 2015 7:01 PM CST
Confused Rabbits are rodents. Beavers, too. I've never had rabbits eat any of my fritillaria, but I've never had them eat my tulips, either. However, I think if I had the perfect garden, as everyone seems to want, that highlights plants and makes them stick out from there surroundings, I think that's only asking to be feasted upon.
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
Image
woofie
Jan 4, 2015 8:55 PM CST
Sorry, Rick. Apparently, you are about 100 years out of date: Smiling
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/words/is-a-rabbit-a-rod...
Beavers, yes. Rabbits, no.
Which has absolutely nothing to do with whether or not they will munch on your prized plants. But the original question had to do with deer and I know a lot of people who consider them vermin, if not rodents! Hilarious!
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN zone 4a
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages The WITWIT Badge Garden Photography Region: Minnesota Plant Identifier
Image
Leftwood
Jan 4, 2015 9:29 PM CST
Big Grin Well then, what else can I say (about rabbits), except Thumbs up
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
Image
woofie
Jan 4, 2015 10:44 PM CST
Mmmm, can you say Hasenpfeffer? Hilarious!
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Jane
Tobyhanna, PA (Zone 5a)
The "Garden" is my Happy Place!
Garden Ideas: Master Level
Image
PAgirl63
Jan 5, 2015 9:10 AM CST
Thanks guys for all your info. Spring will tell the tale whether or not these flowers get a chance to bloom. If they do, I'll post pics. Oh, and don't get me wrong, I do love the deer and try to plant things that they generally will leave alone. If it doesn't work, I can always run to Michael's and find some nice fake plants to stick in the ground. From ten feet away, who's gonna tell the difference? Hilarious! Hilarious! Hilarious!
Name: Annie
Waynesboro, PA (Zone 6a)
Cat Lover Keeper of Poultry
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LysmachiaMoon
Jan 5, 2015 10:37 AM CST
Hmmm....fake foliage. *ponders deeply* This may be a way out.... Green Grin!
The end is nothing, the journey is all.

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