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Name: Roy
Central Illinois (Zone 5b)
Greenhouse
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Reartinetiller
Feb 21, 2015 6:12 PM CST
I have two very mature trumpet vines on the north end of the property that are loaded with blooms every year. I've noticed that around the trellis there are volunteer plants comming up in the yard and in fall the vines produce a ton of seed pods. Since I want to start a few vines in the back yard I'm thinking of starting some from seed inside the house. Then again I'm thinking of transplanting some volunteer plants to the back yard. They sure attract the humming birds. What would you think on getting these vines started? Thank You! Roy
Name: Frank Richards
Clinton, Michigan

Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
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frankrichards16
Feb 21, 2015 6:20 PM CST
Sounds like fun, i would try both:)
Name: Jennifer
48036 MI (Zone 6b)
Cottage Gardener Houseplants Spiders! Heucheras Frogs and Toads Dahlias
Hummingbirder Sedums Winter Sowing Peonies Region: Michigan Garden Ideas: Level 2
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jvdubb
Feb 21, 2015 6:23 PM CST
The surest way to get more trumpet vine is to try and eradicate it! My experience at least Rolling on the floor laughing
Name: Elfrieda
Indian Harbour Beach, Florida (Zone 10a)
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Hibiscus Sempervivums Sedums Dragonflies
Herbs Roses Foliage Fan Annuals Cut Flowers Ferns
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orchidgal
Feb 23, 2015 8:40 AM CST
@jvdubb How true ! I agree
โ€œI was just sittinโ€™ here enjoyinโ€™ the company. Plants got a lot to say, if you take the time to listenโ€
Eeyore
Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Bulbs Foliage Fan Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents
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purpleinopp
Feb 24, 2015 12:00 PM CST
Do you know if they are a native or exotic kind? If they are not the native kind, I wouldn't cultivate them. According to USDA plants, only the native kind grows in IL, so that's a good sign.

Sounds like you should be able to dig up some suckers/volunteers with roots from the base of the mama.
๐Ÿ‘€๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜‚ - SMILE! -โ˜บ๐Ÿ˜Žโ˜ปโ˜ฎ๐Ÿ‘ŒโœŒโˆžโ˜ฏ๐Ÿฃ๐Ÿฆ๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ๐Ÿฏ๐Ÿพ
๐Ÿ€๐Ÿ‘’โ˜€๐Ÿ„๐Ÿ๐ŸŒฑ๐ŸŒฟ๐ŸŒด๐ŸŽ„๐Ÿ‘ฃ๐ŸŒต๐ŸŒทโš˜๐ŸŒน๐ŸŒป๐ŸŒฝ๐Ÿก๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ‚๐ŸŒพ๐ŸŒฟ๐Ÿโฆโง ๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ‚๐ŸŒพ๐ŸŒป๐ŸŒบ๐ŸŒธ๐ŸŒผ๐ŸŒน๐ŸŒณ๐ŸŒฒ
โ˜•๐Ÿ‘“ The only way to succeed is to try.
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Tomato Heads Houseplants Garden Ideas: Level 1 Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Plant Identifier
pirl
Feb 24, 2015 12:07 PM CST
I agree with Jennifer!

cleoxpatria
Feb 27, 2015 7:30 AM CST
Any plant that attracts hummers is a winner with me!!! Go for it and let us know how the "weeds" (oops I mean trumpet vines) work out!!! Hurray! Hurray! Hurray!

cleoxpatria
Feb 27, 2015 8:03 AM CST
PS As a native Texan living in Oman for now, we have the wild orange-red trumpet vines growing here....they are beautiful but the heat of the summer (which can reach over 120 degrees F), I think, keeps them in check.....unfortunately I have not seen hummers here, though sun birds do abound....they're tiny, of irridescent plummage, long curved beaks for getting nectar, and unlike hummers do not fly backwards but do perch.....they, too, are a pleasure to watch and I have a small backyard that has lots of blooming vines that they adore especially the golden bells...........
Name: rita m
angleton, tx (Zone 9a)
zippi1
Mar 3, 2015 8:03 PM CST
we had trumpet vine in our last home northwest of houston, tx i'm guessing it was "wild" but i'm not sure
the house was 35 years old, had an established lawn but had trumpet vine "volunteering" everywhere... the more you pulled up or "poisoned" the more came behind it (even with a paintbrush and brushkiller) every flower bed, rose bush, tree, had it growing up it

i will never plant a vining plant never never never

we also had 6 ft tall four oclocks everywhere

i was soooooooo glad to move.....12 years of those battles were enough..
Name: Jennifer
48036 MI (Zone 6b)
Cottage Gardener Houseplants Spiders! Heucheras Frogs and Toads Dahlias
Hummingbirder Sedums Winter Sowing Peonies Region: Michigan Garden Ideas: Level 2
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jvdubb
Mar 3, 2015 8:06 PM CST
Welcome! Rita
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Region: Alabama Composter Garden Photography Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Seedfork
Mar 3, 2015 8:10 PM CST
zippy1
I do plant some Ivy, the plain green (in pots) and some variegated in the ground, but I feel like you about most vining plants. They are just too hard to control a lot of the time.
[Last edited by Seedfork - Mar 3, 2015 8:34 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #802962 (11)
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Tomato Heads Houseplants Garden Ideas: Level 1 Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Plant Identifier
pirl
Mar 3, 2015 8:17 PM CST
Welcome to ATP, Rita. I agree about the hummingbird vine but find Class 2 and 3 clematises as easy as a vine can get. Not so with the entire "montana" clan, which can become enormous. I have more than 100 clematises and would have yanked them if they were a problem.

I battled the evil, but beautiful, Houttuynia cordata 'Chameleon', for many years and finally won the war but it was a horrible problem.

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