All Things Gardening forum: My apple seedlings leaves are getting brown around the edges?

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MrQuintus
May 7, 2015 12:13 PM CST
Hello!

A couple of months ago I planted 2 apple seeds, however only one of them survived. It has been growing well and has gotten quite a few leaves, however recently the leaves on my seedling is getting brown spots near the edges?

Do anyone have any ideas what the cause might be?

My seedling is placed inside near a window, and gets plenty of sunlight.

Any help would be much appreciated Thank You!

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Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
I'm always on my way out the door..
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Forum moderator Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Dog Lover Cottage Gardener
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chelle
May 7, 2015 2:38 PM CST
Welcome! to ATP MrQuintus.

Congratulations on your apple seedling!

Whenever I see brown leaf tips, I first rule out fertilizer burn. What planting mix is it growing in and how long has it been doing so? Are you feeding it? If so, what and how much?
Cottage Gardening

Newest Interest: Rock Gardens


Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
May 7, 2015 4:38 PM CST
Welcome!

I was thinking "sunburn" or 'dry air", since you mentioned "near a window", but "fertilizer burn" seems more likely.

It looks dark green, so you could just withhold all fertilizer, especially high-nitrogen fertilizer, for a few weeks, to see if that helps.

It's always hard to tell from pictures of soil, but that soil looks dark and wet and maybe pretty fine. Is it well-enough aerated?

Does water come out freely the bottom when you water, or does the pot just absorb water like a camel going into the desert for a month?

If the soilless mix might be waterlogged, re-potting might be worth the effort. If the roots have not penetrated to the bottom of the pot, the mix may be too waterlogged for oxygen to reach the deeper parts of the pot. Sometimes "too much water" limits root growth so much that a little sun and dry draft can draw water out of the leaves faster than the few struggling roots can supply it. Hence wilting despite excess water.

If you don't want to re-pot, you can use a wicking mat to test whether the pot holds too much water.

Water it and wait until no more water comes out the bottom.

Heft it in your hands, or even weigh it, to see how much water it is holding.

Now set the pot down on top of a towel or any absorbent fabric that can touch the soil through the pot's holes. A towel can probably pull all the excess water out, but if you're using a Tee shirt, socks, or a cotton pillowcase, you ight have to dangle the end of the cloth off the edge of the table so excess water will drip down and out.

When water stops WICKING out of the pot, weigh it or heft it again to gauge how much water it was holding as "perched" water. Consider whether YOU would be very happy trying to breath THROUGH that deep a layer of water.

Plants in pots like good drainage.

(I kind of have a "drainage fetish", so listen carefully to Chelle and only try my games if you're interested or the soil DOES seems awfully damp.)

http://garden.org/ideas/view/RickCorey/646/Bottom-Watering-S...
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
I'm always on my way out the door..
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Forum moderator Garden Sages Garden Ideas: Master Level Dog Lover Cottage Gardener
Native Plants and Wildflowers Plant Identifier Organic Gardener Keeps Horses Hummingbirder Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Image
chelle
May 7, 2015 7:12 PM CST
It looks very dense and moisture-retentive to me too, Rick. It may be too much so for indoor growing. I had one woody plant last year that really disliked its richer and possibly anaerobic spot in the garden, and as a result did get the brown leaf edges. I potted it up and left it to its own devices (just a bit of very sporadic rainfall), and it recovered.
Cottage Gardening

Newest Interest: Rock Gardens


Name: Tom Cagle
SE-OH (Zone 6a)
Old, fat, and gardening in OH
Coppice
May 11, 2015 7:29 AM CST
Woody plants in small pots are very subject to anoxia (drowning) when living in peat or loess based soil (the stuff in bags) "potting soil" is too fine.

Better it be potted in a much bigger particle size soil like cactus mix. Which is available at big box stores.

Rummage around on a bonsai forum as see what they keep their trees in (for soil).

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