Ask a Question forum: transplanting roses

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Name: ann sorocki
new bern, nc (Zone 8a)
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asorocki
May 22, 2015 3:43 PM CST
Can I take a cutting from a rose & transplant it? When & how? Also, how & when can I think iris bulbs? Thanks so much. Ann
ann sorocki
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
May 22, 2015 10:17 PM CST
It depends on the rose, Ann. Most roses people grow for the big showy flowers are grafted. So a cutting will give you a less vigorous plant than the parent if you can get it to root.

So-called own root roses will grow true from a cutting because they are not grafted.

On the irises, you might be too late for this year. I am visiting in Utah (zone 6) today and all the tall bearded iris are in full bloom here. If you have nice neighbors with iris you could beg a few starts for next year if they are finished blooming.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
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zuzu
May 23, 2015 3:46 AM CST

Plants Admin

Dizzypyxxy is correct in saying that it depends on the rose, but a few of the other points need clarification.

All roses, own-root or grafted, grow true from cuttings. The cutting is coming from the rose itself, not from the grafting rootstock..

Your cutting will not necessarily be weaker than the parent plant. Hybrid tea roses, grandifloras, and some floribundas require grafting to grow to their full potential. Other roses usually grow quite well on their own roots. If you're taking a cutting from a landscape shrub rose, one of the antique roses (known as OGR's -- Old Garden Roses), a polyantha, a hybrid perpetual, or virtually anything but a hybrid tea, grandiflora, or floribunda, the cutting will grow well on its own roots.

It's best to use a cutting that's about 6-8 inches long with a bud or bloom at the top. The rose's growth hormones are strongest when the rose is in bloom. Before you plant your cutting, cut off the buds or blooms and remove the leaves from the bottom two or three inches of the cutting. I usually dust the exposed leaf nodes with a powdered rooting hormone and then plunge the leafless bottom section of the cutting into a 1-gallon container filled with equal parts of potting soil and vermiculite or perlite (to make the soil more friable). Keep the soil in the container moist, but not soggy, and put the container in the shade for the first few days. After that, you can expose it to part-sun/part-shade for a few weeks and then move it into the sun. After the cutting begins to produce new leaves and to grow, you can transplant it into the ground or into a larger container.

Sometimes I skip the container and plant the cutting directly in the ground close to the parent plant, on the assumption that it's a location the cutting is certain to appreciate. If the parent plant is growing well in the location, so should the cutting.
Name: ann sorocki
new bern, nc (Zone 8a)
I am gracious, pleasant, intelligen
asorocki
May 24, 2015 5:31 AM CST
thank you for posting your replies about roses & how did you figure out what I meant about the irises? My irises have bloomed & I would like to separate them. May I do it now? Thank you for your well-received replies. Ann
ann sorocki
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
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porkpal
May 24, 2015 5:37 AM CST
You might get more attention for your iris question if you posted a separate question with irises in the title. This post is attracting rose people who may (like me) know nothing about irises.
Porkpal
Name: Alex Junge
MN st paul, (Zone 4a)
Plantsmylove
May 24, 2015 9:50 AM CST
Wild type roses may be your best bet they root easier and have more vigor. Then there is also the added benefit they come true from seed.


But be careful some wild roses are so vigorous they will make your property look like sleeping beauty's castle.
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
May 24, 2015 10:05 PM CST
Ann, irises do have a dormant time a few weeks after blooming so you can divide them before they start putting up new growth. Some newer varieties bloom again in the late summer, too.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: ann sorocki
new bern, nc (Zone 8a)
I am gracious, pleasant, intelligen
asorocki
May 25, 2015 5:25 AM CST
thanks again for all your knowledge. I will post separate questions about my plants as each problem arises. Ann
ann sorocki

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