Insect and Bug ID forum: I think it's a bug of some sort?

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Name: Greg
Lake Forest Park, Washington (Zone 8b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Brinybay
Jun 5, 2015 11:01 PM CST
What is this thing? I found it when I was sifting dirt I dug out of a hole for planting.

Thumb of 2015-06-06/Brinybay/d8b81e

"Love the people who treat you right and forget the ones who don't." - Chiune Sugihara
Name: Janet Super Sleuth
Near Lincoln UK
Charter ATP Member Organic Gardener Garden Photography Bee Lover Dragonflies Cat Lover
Butterflies Birds Plant Identifier I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Spiders!
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JRsbugs
Jun 6, 2015 4:56 AM CST
It's the chrysalis of a moth. They usually bury themselves in the soil to keep the correct levels of moisture, if it dries out it's unlikely to be able to hatch. Can you relocate it to a similar place from where it came? It looks quite big so could be a very interesting moth, in fact it could be a Hawk-moth.

http://www.spacefornature.co.uk/defaultc23e.html?gallery=Gal...

Name: Greg
Lake Forest Park, Washington (Zone 8b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
Brinybay
Jun 9, 2015 10:11 AM CST
JRsbugs said:It's the chrysalis of a moth. They usually bury themselves in the soil to keep the correct levels of moisture, if it dries out it's unlikely to be able to hatch. Can you relocate it to a similar place from where it came? It looks quite big so could be a very interesting moth, in fact it could be a Hawk-moth.

http://www.spacefornature.co.uk/defaultc23e.html?gallery=Gal...



Yes, we did relocate it. My wife identified it as a chrysalis and asked me to bury it again, which I did and marked it. I looked up some information about them. There are different kinds, this is probably the hummingbird moth of North America, slightly different from the hawk-moth, but they like warmer climates and from the USDA map, they aren't really supposed to be in the Puget Sound area. One website even considers them a pest. I'll take the chance.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hummingbird_hawk-moth
http://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/pollinators/pollinator-of-t...
http://www.pestnet.com/moth/hummingbird-moth/

"Love the people who treat you right and forget the ones who don't." - Chiune Sugihara
Name: Janet Super Sleuth
Near Lincoln UK
Charter ATP Member Organic Gardener Garden Photography Bee Lover Dragonflies Cat Lover
Butterflies Birds Plant Identifier I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Spiders!
Image
JRsbugs
Jun 9, 2015 11:09 AM CST
Humming-bird Hawk-moth, Macroglossum stellatarum is the one we get here, it's an immigrant from mainland Europe. I haven't seen one since 2011 but they do come here in the summer even though we don't have a warm climate.

http://butterfly-conservation.org/51-1087/humming-bird-hawk-...

Keep your eyes open for the moth, and try to take photos but that's not an easy task!

Name: Benjamin E.
Mercer county, New Jersey, USA
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Sekreuz
Jun 29, 2015 9:11 AM CST
Nice find!

I found a similar one once, it actually would wiggle a little, so I put it back in the dirt.
It had a smooth shell, not rough like the hummingbird/hawk moth one.

-Ben

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