Ask a Question forum: Red Aglaonema

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Ladyinthemeadow
Jun 7, 2015 2:25 AM CST
Hello Everyone!

I just got my first plant, a red aglaonema. Shortly after I purchased it I noticed a leaf was torn pretty good...is that cause for concern? Does it need to be left alone or clipped? Also I was thinking of getting a different pot for it instead of the flimsy one it came in. Is it too soon to put it in a new pot with some fresh soil? I'm new to this so any answers will help! Thanks! :)
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
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Dutchlady1
Jun 7, 2015 4:00 AM CST
Welcome! Ladyinthemeadow; I'm sure someone knowledgeable will be along soon to answer your question.
Name: Gita Veskimets
Baltimore or Nottingham MD-212 (Zone 7a)
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gitagal
Jun 22, 2015 8:12 PM CST
Lady.....

AHHH--The red Agloneamas are so pretty! A new color for this plant. They also have
created a pink one and a speckled one. Aglonema is also known as "Chinese Evergreen
and, "back when"....they only came in green with silvery spots in the leaves.

Aglonemas are easy. LOW LIGHT plants to grow. Just do not overwater them..
They can take a bit of drying out before you water them again. Check soil w/your finger.

A torn leaf is just damage from shipping--handling-- or such. It can be cut back all the way
down to where the leaf grows from. It will NOT affect the plant in any way.

Do not hurry to pot-up newly purchased houseplants. They are fine in the pots they come in.
When the time comes to pot-up--make sure you only choose a pot ONE SIZE bigger and NEVER EVER
add extra soil on top of the existing level the plant has been growing at when you do re-pot.

Lets say--your plant is now in an 8" pot. You would go to a 10" pot when re-potting. 2" wider--also means 2" deeper.
SO--add the extra 2" of soil to the bottom of the pot and sides--NOT on top of it. That may be a death sentence...

Hope this helps. Gita
Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Jun 23, 2015 9:34 AM CST
Welcome!

Agree except that for this kind of plant, I always remove the old soil & replace with new when repotting, whether changing the size of pot or not. If roots are coming out of the holes at the bottom of the pot, it's time for repotting. Often plants fit back into the same size pot. Most people do want a nicer looking pot than the one from the store. When replacing with new soil, as said above, it should be at the same level, where the stem/roots disappear under the surface, not higher or lower.

It's also common to sit a fugly smaller pot inside a nice looking bigger one. When it's time for a drink, sit plant in sink, gently apply water (so the force of gushing water doesn't cause soil to compact.) When it's finished dripping, sit back inside decorative pot. Don't allow water to sit in a drip saucer or in the decorative outer pot, which can cause the roots to rot.

Low light doesn't mean a dark corner, just a spot where sun coming through a window doesn't hit directly on it for very long, if at all. When I put these outside for summer, the sun shines on them for a while in the morning, as a basis for comparison. (Takes some adjustment in shade first before that can be done without burning leaves that have been inside all winter. Not necessary to take your plant outside, I wouldn't recommend it to a newb with just one.)

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Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
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plantladylin
Jun 23, 2015 10:00 AM CST
I must have missed this thread at the beginning of the month! I have a couple of Aglaonema plants.

Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema 'Siam Red') Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema commutatum)
Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema 'Silver Bay')
Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema 'Crete')

As Purple/Tiffany mentioned, leaves tear due to being moved around at garden centers, in shipment etc. and leaves sometimes turn brown ... I just yank them off but you can be more gentle and snip them with scissors. Green Grin!
I don't like the flimsy nursery pots so I usually re-pot my plants after purchase into a more decorative container, especially if it's going to be inside the house; or I camouflage the flimsy pot by sitting it down into a prettier one. I use a fast draining, chunky potting mixture for all of my plants; a combination of potting soil and orchid bark mix but adding extra perlite to potting soil will help with drainage too. Just be sure that whatever container your plant is growing in, that it has good drainage. If the pot has no drainage holes, be very careful about watering so as not to incur root rot. Sometimes soil looks very dry on top and may even feel dry an inch or so down when you stick your finger in it but if there is no drainage in the container the soil at the very bottom where the roots are can get soggy and cause rotting of the roots.
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Ladyinthemeadow
Jun 23, 2015 2:03 PM CST
Thanks for the replies! Hurray!

How often do you all water your aglaonemas? Dr. Google says less in the winter and a few to several times a week during the summer. I find these answers vague to be honest. Confused
Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Jun 23, 2015 2:39 PM CST
No doubt! That's because nobody can know how fast your plant might dry out, which would depend on temp, humidity, air movement, light, pot size compared to plant size, so many variables. When the pot feels lighter, it's probably time for a drink. Knowing how often someone else waters their plant doesn't help you gauge yours at all.

Most plants will use less water during winter, just because the air is cooler, less daylight hours for growing, though some people with really dry air from their heating system can end up watering even more.
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Ladyinthemeadow
Jun 23, 2015 3:53 PM CST
Now that makes sense! Thank You!
There's good humidity where I live. This Saturday we're expecting 98 degrees out (eeek). This week due to the heat I have watered everyday because the plant was very thirsty, but not planning that as a regular thing. Just seemed to be what was needed this week and it is doing alot better.
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)
Region: United States of America Morning Glories Region: Florida Houseplants Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Jun 23, 2015 4:03 PM CST
I agree with Tiffany; with so many variables (climate conditions, potting medium, size of plant etc.) it's impossible to tell someone how often they should water their plants. I don't know Mr. Google ... but watering several times a week sounds really extreme, unless of course the plants are growing in the desert!

Many years ago (late 1960's, early 70's) I couldn't seem to keep any container plant alive for very long because I used a very heavy, water retaining potting soil and also, for some reason I thought I needed to water them two or three times a week ... so I literally drowned every plant I tried to grow.

Nowadays, I go three or four weeks between watering; I take my indoor plants out to the back deck and use a garden hose to thoroughly soak them, as well as all of the many container plants that reside on my screened porch and on two outside decks. The water runs through the pots very quickly so I water, water, water for awhile to be sure to thoroughly soak the soil. I don't have a schedule for watering plants (the older I get the shorter my attention span seems to be) so the plants get watered when I think about it or when I notice that they appear to be screaming for a drink. I live in Florida and grow everything in a very chunky, fast draining potting medium so I'm sure that all the extra moisture in the air helps somewhat ... it seems to be what my plants have become accustomed to and they seem to thrive. Green Grin!

I'd say you should just take your time and find out what works best for your growing conditions.




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Name: Kim Smythe
Auburn, WA
Buttons
Feb 26, 2016 4:09 PM CST
Just got a Red Aglaonema for bedroom. Window has southern exposure but blinds are shut most of the time. Is this area okay for this plant?

Thanks,
Buttons
Buttons
Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
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purpleinopp
Feb 26, 2016 5:05 PM CST
Hi & welcome, Kim! Are they heavy blinds, or more like sheers?
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