Vegetables and Fruit forum: Green pepper question

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Name: Elfrieda
Indian Harbour Beach, Florida (Zone 10a)
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orchidgal
Jun 22, 2015 10:00 PM CST
I have three plants; one in a large pot and one in the garden. All have 2 or 3 peppers on them. However, all the plants are drooping badly. They're watered adequately, but they don't perk up. I don't see any bugs on the leaves (which I hosed off anyway). I've never had this problem before. They look like they're dying. I'm tempted to pull them out and lose the peppers. Sighing!
“I was just sittin’ here enjoyin’ the company. Plants got a lot to say, if you take the time to listen”
Eeyore
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
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ediblelandscapingsc
Jun 22, 2015 11:14 PM CST
Sometimes, peppers wilt because they're baking in the hot sun, but it’s very likely they have fusarium or verticillium wilt. If your peppers are wilting suddenly, developing large yellow areas and drooping despite adequate watering, fungal wilt is probably to blame. Resistance to Verticillium wilt in commercial cultivars of peppers is not common and is difficult to identify in pepper germplasm. Fungal wilts are soil-borne and can live in the soil for many years. Long crop rotations may be able to kill the fusarium and verticillium pathogens, but it will take time before planting in the old location is safe again. Choose a new garden location and keep it free of fungus by increasing drainage and only watering when the top two inches of soil feel dry to the touch. Rotations with broccoli, corn, wheat, barley, or sorghum for a period of at least 2 years (the longer the rotation, the better) can reduce inoculum and subsequent plant infection. These crops are not hosts for the Verticillium pathogen, and populations of the pathogen will decline where host plants are not present. In severe cases, do not replant peppers in the same spot for a minimum of 3 years. I hope this helps.
🌿A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered🌿
Name: Elfrieda
Indian Harbour Beach, Florida (Zone 10a)
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Hibiscus Sempervivums Sedums Dragonflies
Herbs Roses Foliage Fan Annuals Cut Flowers Ferns
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orchidgal
Jun 23, 2015 10:28 AM CST
Yes, thanks Daniel. I had wondered about a fungal wilt. The plants in the garden, in ground, are in totally new locations -- tucked amongst some flowers. They were healthy looking; but rather wilting now, even though they have some peppers on them. The one in the big planter is now wilting all the time; even though three weeks ago I picked three huge peppers off it. It is unbelievably hot here - high 90s., which definitely doesn't help. But, to be on the safe side, I'll take your advice and take these pepper plants out. Much appreciated. Thank You!
“I was just sittin’ here enjoyin’ the company. Plants got a lot to say, if you take the time to listen”
Eeyore
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
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ediblelandscapingsc
Jun 24, 2015 4:05 AM CST
You are very welcome Elfie, glad I could help.
🌿A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered🌿
Name: Elfrieda
Indian Harbour Beach, Florida (Zone 10a)
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Hibiscus Sempervivums Sedums Dragonflies
Herbs Roses Foliage Fan Annuals Cut Flowers Ferns
Image
orchidgal
Jul 4, 2015 9:22 PM CST
Well, I had to finally pull the plants out of the ground; the roots were covered in nodules --- nematodes ! Darn it.
“I was just sittin’ here enjoyin’ the company. Plants got a lot to say, if you take the time to listen”
Eeyore
Name: Daniel Erdy
Catawba SC (Zone 7b)
Permaculture Sempervivums Hybridizer Xeriscape Plant and/or Seed Trader Organic Gardener
Bee Lover Daylilies Region: South Carolina Garden Ideas: Level 2 Herbs Region: United States of America
Image
ediblelandscapingsc
Jul 11, 2015 9:18 PM CST
Well the good thing is you've determined what the problem was. now all you have to do is find RKN resistant peppers until you can get them under control which is a long process but obtainable. Sadly you can expect to see a decline in all your plants that are susceptible until corrected because those little you know whats spread like wildfire in sandy soils. They are among one the worst thing to happen to a garden, but in FL there are more than a few bad pest that are on the top 5 list. With RKN having such a broad spectrum of host you should act as quickly as possible to get them under control. As your plants begin to suffer other pest will notice the stressed plants and can put them out of there misery or kick them while they are down. I hate to say it's a downward spiral but without acting quickly it is just that. If you have the money have a professional come out and determine what will be your best options. If you're poor like me there are many helpful links on the net and even some youtube videos out there that can give you some ideas on how to control them. Use several things in conjuction and only plant resistant varieties of plants for the time being. There are some hot and bell peppers that were bred here in SC that are resistant to RKN, Charleston bell I know is one of them but it may be hard to find. I have some friends that may have some extra seeds if you are interested, I can ask for some. Good luck and don't give up.
🌿A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered🌿
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
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dyzzypyxxy
Jul 22, 2015 3:08 PM CST
Solarize the soil in that bed, Elfie! Summer is the time to do it if the bed gets good direct sun, too. By fall it should be nematode free, at least for a year or two, and you can plant some winter veggies there.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

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