Ask a Question forum: late blooming annuals

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Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
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davidsevit
Jun 30, 2015 4:49 AM CST
someone told me.........
that the late bloomers start there beauty towards autumn because they belong to a common latitude wich behaves similarly to the "length of day\quantity of light.
the plants are:
celosia ,vinka,gomfrena,zinia,portulaka,cochia,cosmos........
my question is:
1.i have some celosias in plant pots.....also i am growing zinnias since april from seeds they look fine.......what will happen to them towards autumn?should i chop there heads off now and let them grow wider or taller and wait for the begining of autumn?
2.if i sow late bloomers now does that mean i have more time until autumn enters?
i dont quite get the late blooming bloomin thing?
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
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dyzzypyxxy
Jun 30, 2015 10:01 AM CST
David, I think it depends where you live. For example, our longest day here in Florida at this time of year is about 15 hours of daylight, whereas up in Canada they get nearly 19 hours of daylight in June. Sweden and Alaska - 22 hours plus! In winter, though, we have longer days than more northerly places.

There are some plants that are triggered to put on blooms by day length, like poinsettia but I've never heard of an annual that you couldn't bring along to bloom at just about any time of year with good growth and enough sunlight. (and of course minimum warmth at night through winter, such as a greenhouse would provide)

If I start Zinnia seeds in February, I can have them blooming by April, and keep them going as long as I deadhead them (remove the spent flower heads). Bugs or fungal infection kill them off eventually or a few cold nights in December. Vinca is sold here nearly year 'round and is somewhat perennial. It blooms off and on in winter, and all the time from March through November.

Perennial bloomers can be more light sensitive i.e. require a certain amount of sun to start blooming. But perennials like gingers which are labeled to bloom "late summer" are already in bloom for me here. It warmed up nearly a month early here this year.

Your climate and the varying seasonal warm-up and cool down will determine when your annuals will bloom for you.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
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davidsevit
Jul 1, 2015 4:01 AM CST
thank you elaine
its when i ask a question and then regret......
why
because i discover there are so many factors to consider that it really gets heavy.
i am preparing pictures to show you soon
david
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
Jul 1, 2015 8:56 AM CST
So right, David. There are no "hard and fast" rules in gardening. Just too many factors go into it to expect any plant to do something exactly the way someone else's plant does. Or even to grow exactly the same one year to the next.

Even a plant grown on one side of your house might grow differently than the same plant on the other side. Soil, temperature, amount of sun, what other plants are there, does the rain reach it . . ? So many variables.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Michele Roth
N.E. Indiana - Zone 5b
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chelle
Jul 1, 2015 9:09 AM CST
I used to worry about the variables so much that I often failed to plant. No longer; now I keep on sowing and just enjoy whatever results I get. Smiling
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Name: Celia
West Valley City, Utah (Zone 7a)
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Zencat
Jul 1, 2015 9:22 AM CST
I'm in agreement. And it's the failures that teach me more than the successes. Why did it fail? Was it soil? Lighting? Water? Location? Insects? What can I change? What can I NOT change?

Experiment and see what works for you. Thumbs up

BTW, your plants look great!
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
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davidsevit
Jul 1, 2015 12:48 PM CST
thanks for the complement
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
Image
davidsevit
Jul 1, 2015 12:49 PM CST
dyzzypyxxy said:So right, David. There are no "hard and fast" rules in gardening. Just too many factors go into it to expect any plant to do something exactly the way someone else's plant does. Or even to grow exactly the same one year to the next.

Even a plant grown on one side of your house might grow differently than the same plant on the other side. Soil, temperature, amount of sun, what other plants are there, does the rain reach it . . ? So many variables.


you are perfectly right
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
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davidsevit
Jul 1, 2015 12:50 PM CST
chelle said:I used to worry about the variables so much that I often failed to plant. No longer; now I keep on sowing and just enjoy whatever results I get. Smiling


good idea thank you
Name: david sevitt
jerusalem israel
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davidsevit
Jul 1, 2015 12:52 PM CST
dyzzypyxxy said:So right, David. There are no "hard and fast" rules in gardening. Just too many factors go into it to expect any plant to do something exactly the way someone else's plant does. Or even to grow exactly the same one year to the next.

Even a plant grown on one side of your house might grow differently than the same plant on the other side. Soil, temperature, amount of sun, what other plants are there, does the rain reach it . . ? So many variables.


your right i need to be more flexible

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