Hampton Court Palace Flower Show (Part 3): The next best thing to being there!

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Hampton Court Palace Flower Show (Part 3)

By NEILMUIR1
July 26, 2011

As the sun came out, my day at Hampton Court beside the River Thames was getting better, apart from the odd shower. Now I could at last get out and wander on this hallowed ground. Join me as I finish in the floral marquee and go for another trek.

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Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
Charter ATP Member Celebrating Gardening: 2015 I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped beta test the first seed swap Region: United States of America Region: Michigan
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Weedwhacker
Jul 25, 2011 8:36 PM CST
Neil, thank you for the wonderful photos -- it gives us a chance to walk through that garden right along with you! I'm particularly fascinated by the bonsai plants, as soon as I can hire a gardener to take care of them I will start my own collection. Big Grin

What is a coracle??? (I do wish you people in the UK would learn to speak English Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing )

Can't wait for part 4. Lovey dubby
Name: Neil
London\Kent Border
Forum moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level Tip Photographer I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Charter ATP Member Region: United Kingdom
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NEILMUIR1
Jul 25, 2011 11:06 PM CST
Dear Sandy, sorry we in the UK do have a problem speaking English as we were once a proud Country but are now just a Region!
The coracle is a small, lightweight boat of the sort traditionally used in Wales but also in parts of Western and South Western England, Ireland (particularly the River Boyne), and Scotland (particularly the River Spey); the word is also used of similar boats found in India, Vietnam, Iraq and Tibet. The word "coracle" comes from the Welsh cwrwgl, cognate with Irish and Scottish Gaelic currach, and is recorded in English as early as the sixteenth century. Other historical English spellings include corougle, corracle, curricle and coricle.
Oval in shape and very similar to half a walnut shell, the structure is made of a framework of split and interwoven willow rods, tied with willow bark. The outer layer was originally an animal skin such as horse or bullock hide (corium), with a thin layer of tar to make it fully water proof – today replaced by tarred calico or canvas, or simply fibreglass. Some of the remains of these that have been found are much older than the 1500s.
So that Sandy is a Coracle like the Coracle on the pond in my Article.
Group hug Lovey dubby
Neil.
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Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
Charter ATP Member Celebrating Gardening: 2015 I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped beta test the first seed swap Region: United States of America Region: Michigan
Seed Starter Vegetable Grower Birds Butterflies Dog Lover Cat Lover
Image
Weedwhacker
Jul 26, 2011 6:57 AM CST
Very thorough explanation, Neil ! I don't believe I have ever seen that word before (unless I saw the Welsh version and thought it was a typo, lol) -- but your description of it as half a walnut shell makes me think I have seen them on our "reality" TV show "The Amazing Race," where the contestants had to use them to get themselves across a little river (although I have no recollection of where they were at the time). They appeared quite difficult to maneuver! Smiling
Name: Neil
London\Kent Border
Forum moderator Garden Ideas: Master Level Tip Photographer I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Charter ATP Member Region: United Kingdom
Ferns Native Plants and Wildflowers Seed Starter Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters The WITWIT Badge
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NEILMUIR1
Jul 26, 2011 11:14 AM CST
Dear Sandy, they are most difficult to control indeed! They take a lot of practice before you master them and then like a lot of things very easy and safe! however when you are learning be prepared to get very wet.
I am used to getting very wet and yes I can and have used a coracle. They are much loved by hunters and camera men/women as they are almost silent, and are so light can be carried on your back!
You should have some fun in one some time, and try getting wet. Rolling on the floor laughing
Group hug Lovey dubby
Neil.
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