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lswald1
Aug 11, 2015 1:33 PM CST
Hi all,
We are in the process of retiring and moving to a small town just northwest of Boise. While we are really excited and look forward to living in a small town this will be a new gardening experience for me. We will be moving from zone 9 so its going to be interesting. I of course have a million questions but first and foremost I want to know about trees. Any suggestions as to what trees to line my long ( I mean 1/4 mile long) driveway with. Any help and this and any other suggestions on what will survive the zone 6B winters will certainly be appreciated.
Thanks
Linda
Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Aug 11, 2015 2:29 PM CST
Your best source at this point is likely to be @Natalie, who is also a fairly recent transplant to Idaho. I'm sure she'll chime in. Welcome to ATP and glad you found the PNW forum.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Aug 11, 2015 3:29 PM CST
Hi Iswald, welcome to this corner of the country and to ATP!

Welcome!

I'm a PNW coastal moldie with no clue about Idaho growing conditions. But I'm going to guess that you have extremes of heat AND cold, and drying winds.

Are you thinking about ornamental trees, evergreens, stately oaks or ... ?

I think the most important single factor after "will they live here and be healthy?" is "What do you like?" For example, if you don't like lots of bamboo, this won't help you at all. (And I don't really know if bamboo is likely to survive in Idaho. They might not like drying winds.)

If I was trying to fill in two 1/4 mile rows without going broke, I would look for a very cold-hardy clumping bamboo, and then split the original patch every 4-5 years. I'd also split each new patch every 4-5 years, until I had enough clumps started along the driveway that they would fill in within a few years.

If you really can split each clump four ways every five years, and transplant the extra three clumps, it adds up relatively quickly, compared to waiting for oaks to "fill in" a long row.

By year 15, you're a bamboo nursery.

But Zone 6B gets down to −21 °C or −5 °F in an AVERAGE year.

I wonder how cold it gets in an unusual year, say one that only occurs every 20 years? That might be a good temperature to choose for "cold hardiness" of trees that might be a 50-year or 80-year investment.

1 clump of bamboo
4 clumps (Year 5)
16 clumps (Year 10)
64 clumps (Year 15)
256 clumps, or continuous rows (Year 20)

I searched the ABS site for clumpers cold hardy down to -10F with minimal damage and found four species within the genus Fargesia.

http://www.bamboo.org/BambooSourceList/BambooPlants.php?G=Al...

This is my little cutie:
Fargeseia rufa from Home Depot, 2009 and 2014

Thumb of 2015-08-11/RickCorey/8437ac Thumb of 2015-08-11/RickCorey/039d35


Thumb of 2015-08-11/RickCorey/02f8e5

Name: Natalie
North Central Idaho (Zone 7a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Frogs and Toads Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Native Plants and Wildflowers
Cottage Gardener Dog Lover Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Region: United States of America Echinacea Xeriscape
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Natalie
Aug 11, 2015 3:48 PM CST
Hi lswald1! Welcome! to ATP!!!

I've been in Idaho for 2 years now, and LOVE it here! I'm further north though, between Lewiston and Orofino. We're on the Clearwater River, so my climate is very different. I'd suggest contacting the extension office there. They are fantastic up here, and have a wealth of information that pertains to our area. I'm sure that the office there will be just as helpful. They know for sure which are the best trees are for specific areas. They also have great classes, and lots of free information to take home and read.
Natalie
Name: Kate
Kirkland, WA (Zone 7b)
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Maukahound
Aug 11, 2015 4:06 PM CST
Will you be out I-84, or .....?
Specifics would depend on your elevation, soil type, sun exposure & whether it's a sheltered location. Not all zone 6 areas are the same; what they do have in common is typical low temperatures.
That said there are many trees to grow. Another question: what is your vision of the driveway? All trees, or possibly some shrubs tucked in here & there? Having both allows for more bird habitat, as well as a staggered flowering season, which is good for the various pollinators, and very pleasant for the eyes.
Let us know as much as possible. I am particularly biased towards trees & shrubs, if one has the space: gives the property an entirely different dimension!
Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Aug 11, 2015 4:23 PM CST
I've seen some really lovely screens done with a combination of evergreens, deciduous trees, and shrubs - spaced to blend together naturally as it fills in. Many shrubs will grow to 15-20' if left unpruned, and both the spring and fall shows can be outstanding. Sounds like a fun project - feel free to start a thread and post pictures as you progress. We all love to watch things unfold.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.

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lswald1
Aug 11, 2015 8:35 PM CST
Thanks everyone. I have this vision of a tree lined driveway, right now its a weed lined 1/4 mile driveway HaHa
Does anyone know of a tree called Catalpa? Also I'll need a mountain of information on what grows and doesn't grow there.
What type of evergreen, does dogwood grow here, how about camelia? See what I mean lol
Thanks
Linda
Name: Deb
Pacific Northwest (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Herbs Dragonflies Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry
Birds Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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Bonehead
Aug 11, 2015 8:46 PM CST
I would check your local native plant program first - those will be easiest to introduce and will look natural. I've found really good information and even planting plans at my county website.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Kate
Kirkland, WA (Zone 7b)
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Maukahound
Aug 12, 2015 12:07 AM CST
Both Camellia sasanqua & japonica are rated for zones 7 - 10, with C. sasanqua being able to handle cooler temperatures. They prefer moist, acidic soil & part shade (during the heat of the afternoon). Here in the PNW they can be planted full sun. I would consider them a borderline plant for Idaho with sheltered siting in the shade.
Cornus florida is rated zones 5 - 9. They, too, prefer moist soil with a bit of shade in the afternoon as they are an understory tree. They aren't very tolerant of stress from heat, drought, salt & wind. However, I would plant one, depending on your site elevation & exposure.
Catalpa speciosa is rated for zones 4-8 & grown throughout the midwest. It is exceptionally tolerant of dryer conditions & full sun. They sucker though, so you'd have to keep up with that. Gorgeous tree!
Name: Kate
Kirkland, WA (Zone 7b)
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Maukahound
Aug 12, 2015 12:11 AM CST
Check this out: Lots of information geared to Boise, but a nice reference.
https://parks.cityofboise.org/media/4770/Forestry-TreeSelect...
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Aug 12, 2015 12:24 PM CST
Here are links to lists of native plants in Idaho.

The fourth link mentions these trees:

Abies concolor
Balsam fir, Colorado fir, Concolor fir, Oyamel de California, Silver fir, White balsam, White fir

Abies grandis
Giant fir, Grand fir , Abies lasiocarpa, Subalpine fir

Acer glabrum Rocky Mountain maple

Acer grandidentatum Bigtooth maple, Big-toothed maple, Canyon maple

Sometimes it helps to go to a nursery with a few names in mind, but then LOOK AROUND and see what pleases your eyes. THEN go look them up and figure out whether the nursery salesperson was being helpful or trying to stick you with something that will never be happy in your climate.

You can do the same thing with neighbors: peek over fences and around corners. Find some trees that you like the looks of. If you see HEALTHY blooming trees in spring that you like, note them down.

Reverse the "Welcome Wagon" routine and bring some cookies or bread or fruit to that neighbor with something you like, and introduce yourself. Tell them you LOVE their tree, what type is it? They won't know, but then you can take pictures of leaves, bark and limb structure and ask someone else.

If you ask what kind of plants SHE likes best, and she's a gardener, you may have a garden friend for life.

Meanwhile the neighbor thinks you're perceptive and artistic for liking her tree!

https://idahonativeplants.org/

http://www.plantnative.org/rpl-imw.htm

https://itd.idaho.gov/highways/ops/maintenance/Roadside/docu...

https://www.wildflower.org/collections/collection.php?collec...

Name: Lauri
North Central Washington (Zone 5b)
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Greenhouse Foliage Fan Vegetable Grower Organic Gardener
Seed Starter Dog Lover Cat Lover Birds Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Plant Identifier
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lauribob
Aug 13, 2015 4:17 PM CST
Welcome to the Inland Northwest and to ATP! I'm not sure exactly what the winters are like around Boise - I lived there one winter, but it was unseasonably mild to the point that the ski area was only able to open briefly by piling snow up in paths through the sagebrush. One thing I would keep in mind is the snowplow. (I am assuming you will have to have your driveway plowed at least occasionally.) Hold your trees back far enough from the driveway to give the plow dude plenty of room to pile the snow. Ditto for any fences you may put up near the driveway. You want to be ready for the big snow years as well as the average years. You can find out from your neighbors what the normal snowfall is like.

I've got a catalpa here in my zone 5 yard - beautiful trees with lovely flowers in the spring. Very large leaves which can cause a bit of a damp mat when they fall off in the fall if they aren't raked or mowed. Pretty fast growing.

Look around your neighborhood and see what trees do well and appeal to you. How much water they need and your ability to get it to them will also be a factor. Good luck with your new home and your new project!
More costumes, less uniforms!

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lswald1
Aug 15, 2015 9:22 AM CST
Wow thanks for all the advice and suggestions. This is going to be a real learning experience for me. I love the native plants and need to visit some local nurserys . I do know some of the neighbors already.
I want to get all my information for next spring. I appreciate any and all help
Name: Mary
The dry side of Oregon
Be yourself, you can be no one else
Charter ATP Member Region: Oregon Farmer Enjoys or suffers cold winters
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MaryE
Aug 30, 2015 5:12 PM CST
One big factor is water. Are you on irrigated land or dry? That will make a big difference on what will grow there. I'm about 125 miles northwest of you.
Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most.
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