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 Make Your Ponds More Inviting to Frogs

By Newyorkrita
August 26, 2015

Ever wonder why some ponds have frogs and others don't? Help the frogs out with pond plants.

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Name: Dinu
Mysore, India (Zone 10a)
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Dinu
Aug 25, 2015 11:04 PM CST
I have a pond and we have plenty of toads and no frogs in the city urbans. I just wondered if frogs eat in water or they catch insects out of water? My pond is lush with water hyacinth and water lettuce.
The best place to seek God is in a garden. You can dig for Him there. ~ GB Shaw, 'Adventures of the black girl'
Name: Rita
North Shore, Long Island, NY
Zone 6B
Charter ATP Member Seed Starter Tomato Heads I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Vegetable Grower Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
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Newyorkrita
Aug 26, 2015 1:43 PM CST
I think frogs usually sit on the vegetation in the pond and catch flying insects. But I am no expert on frogs.
Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
Dances with Dirt
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gardengus
Aug 26, 2015 6:31 PM CST
Most frogs eat insects and worms , some eat other frogs and snakes.
Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.

Wildbirds
Aug 31, 2015 11:54 AM CST
There is an article about an unusual frog meal-victim in one of the dedicated 'Birding' type magazines several years ago ... A woman had watched a favoured large frog in her garden pond catch & devour a nearby hovering hummingbird. To confirm what she believed she had seen, she investigated at a later point and wrote that she did find some of the hummer's bones plus some feathers by her pond - mixed in throughout the droppings of that frog.

Back in the 1950's, as a youngster, we would catch large bullfrogs (Now quite rare) in the marshes & lakeside edges by using fishing lures dangled in front of the frog to entice them to 'hit' them. Sometimes those bass lures would be quite large (Today I would consider such behaviour to be cruel and unwarranted, even when & where a season exists for the harvest of frogs legs as a meal) (Which is what we were doing way back then) ... A frog will attempt to catch & to swallow anything alive & moving (Or appearing to be so) that it thinks it will be able to swallow whole.

Although I have heard of pond frogs catching goldfish that surfaced in their pond, I have never experienced or actually seen such an incident.

We have maintained a haphazard collection of a few small bog type water gardens in a collection of various containers (Approx. 10-25 gallon sizes) None were deeper than about 10 inches - some as shallow as 5-6 inches. We set these on top of our septic tank cover, immediately adjacent to a large rock garden that has many closely planted sedums, primula, iris, euphorbia, etc. Within the 'ponds' themselves we've enjoyed collecting small bog & water plants including a few elephant ears plus duckweed etc. ... And unexpectedly, frogs showed up every season. Every season, despite the fact that we are at least a mile or so from any natural water source.

This year, so far we have only one green frog in residence. Last season we counted as many as 11 at one point. Our highest count was 17 individual frogs of various sizes. Whenever it rained the population would drop back as the frogs would return to the gardens & nearby fields to forage we believe. When the weather again became drier, the frog count would increase again.

Our only negative about creating an environment for both the bog plants & the frogs is that raccoons find both attractive for their food searches . In one night we went from a pleasing natural looking collection of bog gardens with about 15-17 resident frogs, to a mess of scattered plants, overturned tubs and several body parts of partially eaten frogs. Reality. Life in the country. We simply cleaned up and restarted the collection.
Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
Dances with Dirt
Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Garden Procrastinator Herbs Vegetable Grower Plant Identifier
Organic Gardener Keeps Goats Garden Photography Cottage Gardener Composter Houseplants
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gardengus
Aug 31, 2015 2:50 PM CST
Welcome!
TO ATP

I have always been curious where frogs travel from when natural water sources are so far away. They just seem to show up Shrug!
I to use to go frog hunting with my dad(60's) , and I have to admit legs are tasty.
What state are you from?
Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.
Name: Rita
North Shore, Long Island, NY
Zone 6B
Charter ATP Member Seed Starter Tomato Heads I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Vegetable Grower Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Birds Garden Ideas: Master Level Butterflies Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Roses Hummingbirder
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Newyorkrita
Aug 31, 2015 6:38 PM CST
Wildbirds said:There is an article about an unusual frog meal-victim in one of the dedicated 'Birding' type magazines several years ago ... A woman had watched a favoured large frog in her garden pond catch & devour a nearby hovering hummingbird. To confirm what she believed she had seen, she investigated at a later point and wrote that she did find some of the hummer's bones plus some feathers by her pond - mixed in throughout the droppings of that frog.

Back in the 1950's, as a youngster, we would catch large bullfrogs (Now quite rare) in the marshes & lakeside edges by using fishing lures dangled in front of the frog to entice them to 'hit' them. Sometimes those bass lures would be quite large (Today I would consider such behaviour to be cruel and unwarranted, even when & where a season exists for the harvest of frogs legs as a meal) (Which is what we were doing way back then) ... A frog will attempt to catch & to swallow anything alive & moving (Or appearing to be so) that it thinks it will be able to swallow whole.

Although I have heard of pond frogs catching goldfish that surfaced in their pond, I have never experienced or actually seen such an incident.

We have maintained a haphazard collection of a few small bog type water gardens in a collection of various containers (Approx. 10-25 gallon sizes) None were deeper than about 10 inches - some as shallow as 5-6 inches. We set these on top of our septic tank cover, immediately adjacent to a large rock garden that has many closely planted sedums, primula, iris, euphorbia, etc. Within the 'ponds' themselves we've enjoyed collecting small bog & water plants including a few elephant ears plus duckweed etc. ... And unexpectedly, frogs showed up every season. Every season, despite the fact that we are at least a mile or so from any natural water source.

This year, so far we have only one green frog in residence. Last season we counted as many as 11 at one point. Our highest count was 17 individual frogs of various sizes. Whenever it rained the population would drop back as the frogs would return to the gardens & nearby fields to forage we believe. When the weather again became drier, the frog count would increase again.

Our only negative about creating an environment for both the bog plants & the frogs is that raccoons find both attractive for their food searches . In one night we went from a pleasing natural looking collection of bog gardens with about 15-17 resident frogs, to a mess of scattered plants, overturned tubs and several body parts of partially eaten frogs. Reality. Life in the country. We simply cleaned up and restarted the collection.


I really enjoyed reading about your frogs and water gardens. Yup, those racoons do sometimes raise havoc but they seem to be just about everywhere.

Wildbirds
Sep 5, 2015 5:59 AM CST
Request was to know what state I'm from ... Ontario, Canada ...

Perhaps 100 miles as 'The-crow-flies' due north of Rochester, New York (But you'd have quite a swim to get here if you weren't that crow.) .... Urban or rural? ... Real country. Dairy herds & field crops & maple sugar bush & apple orchards .... However, several millions of people live within a couple of hours drive around us. (An hour NE of Toronto's International Airport) yet we have whitetail deer; black bear; coyote; red fox; river otter; over 100 species of birds ID'd here; opossum; wild turkey; beaver; mink; pine marten; bobcat; porcupine; milk-snakes; garter snakes; plenty of praying mantis; very few monarch butterflies nowadays, plus 3-4 species of frogs ... and many more critters. All found within 10 minutes from our front door.
Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
Dances with Dirt
Native Plants and Wildflowers Critters Allowed Garden Procrastinator Herbs Vegetable Grower Plant Identifier
Organic Gardener Keeps Goats Garden Photography Cottage Gardener Composter Houseplants
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gardengus
Sep 5, 2015 6:24 AM CST
sounds like a wildlife refuge , what a great place to live. Smiling
In my younger days we lived in Michigan and all our vacations were spent in Ontario.
Lots of great places there Thumbs up
Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.

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