Plumeria forum: New to Plumeria

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Name: Karen
Southeast PA (Zone 6b)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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kousa
Aug 26, 2015 8:59 AM CST
Hi! I fell in love with pictures of plumerias and recently bought 2 plumerias from Ken and have 5 more coming from Hetty (3 for me, 2 for a friend). I have followed Ken's instructions on potting up the plumerias. About how long does it take a cutting to root? How do I know if they rooted? How will I know when they go dormant vs being dead if they don't have time to leaf out? Where is a good place for plumerias when they go dormant? Should I put them in a dark place or a cool place? What signs do I look for if they make it through dormancy? Sorry so many questions. Thanks for your help.
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Aug 26, 2015 9:12 AM CST

Moderator

Hello, Karen, glad you came and joined us here.

1. How long is a piece of string? They each have a different time to root, depending on the variety but also conditions.
2. When you see good sized leaves forming, you can be fairly sure they have rooted
3. Dormant is: hard stem, no leaves; dead or dying is soft or mushy stem.
4. Cool but frost free; they don't need light or water during their dormant period. A garage is good, or a spare bedroom. You may mist occasionally if the air is very dry.
5. In spring the tips start glistening signifying that they are 'waking up'. It is then time to give them water, and light. Once you have a couple of good sized leaves you can start fertilizing.

Happy growing!!
[Last edited by Dutchlady1 - Aug 26, 2015 1:56 PM (+)]
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Name: Ken Ramsey
Starkville, MS (Zone 8a)
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]
Orchids Greenhouse Vegetable Grower Ferns Region: United States of America Hummingbirder
Composter Bromeliad Master Gardener: Mississippi Cat Lover Tropicals Plumerias
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drdawg
Aug 26, 2015 1:11 PM CST
When I see leaves growing, and that might be only two weeks for a Celadine or 6 weeks for a Scott Pratt, I will gently tug upward on the stem. If there is resistance to dislodgement, there is rooting. If the stem just comes easily out of the perlite, nothings going on. Of course, since I am nosey, I always will remove that stem just to be absolutely sure. I want to be sure the stem is still firm and there is no sign of rot. It is easy enough to just slip the stem back into the perlite if there are no roots.
drdawg (Ken Ramsey) - Tropical Plants & More
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]www.tropicalplantsandmore.com[/url]
If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
Name: Karen
Southeast PA (Zone 6b)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
kousa
Aug 26, 2015 3:05 PM CST
Thank you guys! I just thought it would be easier to post the questions here in case someone new out there has the same questions. I was going over the previous posts on this forum looking for more information. I was feeling pretty confident about rooting the cuttings until I came to Tarev's posts and I got worried. Perhaps I am in over my head with trying to root these cuttings. Thank You! for putting my worries to rest.
Name: Ken Ramsey
Starkville, MS (Zone 8a)
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]
Orchids Greenhouse Vegetable Grower Ferns Region: United States of America Hummingbirder
Composter Bromeliad Master Gardener: Mississippi Cat Lover Tropicals Plumerias
Image
drdawg
Aug 26, 2015 3:46 PM CST
You are not over your head at all, Karen. The main thing to remember is that these cuttings, without roots, have no way to utilize water or fertilizer. And though it is counter-intuitive to the vast majority of us, you want to keep that rooting media dry. All moisture will do is cause the rooting to rot. I do spritz the leaves of my cuttings every few days, but I don't know that there is any proven reason for my doing so. I think it just makes me feel better to do so. Sighing!
drdawg (Ken Ramsey) - Tropical Plants & More
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]www.tropicalplantsandmore.com[/url]
If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
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tarev
Aug 26, 2015 6:05 PM CST
Aww. sorry to worry you about my posts Karen..it is just my Plumeria diary for myself really, and if it helps others understand the plant better am glad if it can. But typically, be mindful of the temps you have your Plumeria cutting especially if coming out of dormancy. In my very dry and low humidity area, it really takes its sweet time to wake up properly. In my very dry area, even if the tips show glistening, it is still half asleep, got to have that right temp and heat feeling to fully wake up the plant. When our overnights still swing below 60's it is taking longer. But now our overnights are more stable nearer to 60's overnight and our daytime temps go way hot and hotter that is the time I truly saw it show better signs of life, and that is the time I give it more frequent watering, at times daily.

Ken's and Hetty's area have good humidity levels and rain..we got poor humidity and terribly dry, so my plants have now shown me they will do active growth towards mid summer to early Fall. I don't spritz the leaves of my Plumies, I find it seems to hate our hard water which leaves ugly marks on it, it is okay if the water is just direct to the soil when it is ready to wake up. However, if we do get some nice liquid gold..they really love that..sadly..that is like an illusion here during summer..got to wait for November for good rainfall to occur, if it does come about. Rolling my eyes.
Name: Lucky
Sacramento CA (Zone 9b)
Plumerias
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luckyzl230
Aug 30, 2015 1:44 AM CST
Hello @tarev

Just saw your zone and thought of how close we are. Your right up the way from me.
Your certainly correct about humidity and how dry it is here.
In this being my 1st year of growing plumerias I've found that growing them in pots is a must. Being able to move my plants out of 100+ degree sunlight helps against sun burn.
Lucky Patrick
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener Xeriscape
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tarev
Aug 30, 2015 4:36 PM CST
Hullo Lucky! You are about 1.3 hours to my north! Yup, our dry heat conditons here are just terrible isn't it! That is why I grow them in containers too. Our city trees are helping shield my plumies a bit thankfully during the hours of 1pm to 5pm, so I just have to step up watering directly at soil level when our temps are forecast to go 95F and higher. Just watch when it starts dropping the leaves in late Fall to winter..it wants to sleep. Big Grin

Name: Karen
Southeast PA (Zone 6b)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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kousa
Sep 20, 2015 1:16 PM CST
Here are my two plumerias after about 4 weeks. They were potted for rooting around August 18. It's been more than 4 weeks. Do you think they have rooted yet? Will I hurt the plants if I remove them to see if they rooted and transplanted to bigger pots?

Slaughter Pink
Thumb of 2015-09-20/kousa/897a85
Closer shot of the tip:
Thumb of 2015-09-20/kousa/58e28b

Plumeria Valerie Irene

Thumb of 2015-09-20/kousa/a6fac5

Thumb of 2015-09-20/kousa/c02281

Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Sep 20, 2015 3:15 PM CST

Moderator

Karen - I would not take them out - the fact that the Slaughter Pink has a good set of leaves means that it's most likely rooted. The Valerie Irene needs a bit more time in my opinion.
Name: Ken Ramsey
Starkville, MS (Zone 8a)
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]
Orchids Greenhouse Vegetable Grower Ferns Region: United States of America Hummingbirder
Composter Bromeliad Master Gardener: Mississippi Cat Lover Tropicals Plumerias
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drdawg
Sep 20, 2015 3:33 PM CST
If you will leave them in their "rooting" pots, exactly what is the make-up of the potting soil?
drdawg (Ken Ramsey) - Tropical Plants & More
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If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
Name: Karen
Southeast PA (Zone 6b)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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kousa
Sep 20, 2015 4:18 PM CST
It is 50% peat moss and 50% perlite. I am thinking of transplanting the Slaughter Pink to a bigger pot because it is rather top heavy. I have it leaned against the wall for support for the last month. Nothing I stick inside my small pot could support it. It is getting a bit cooler now like mid 50's during the nights.
Name: Ken Ramsey
Starkville, MS (Zone 8a)
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]
Orchids Greenhouse Vegetable Grower Ferns Region: United States of America Hummingbirder
Composter Bromeliad Master Gardener: Mississippi Cat Lover Tropicals Plumerias
Image
drdawg
Sep 20, 2015 4:28 PM CST
Karen, are you going to let your plumeria go dormant or grow them inside during the fall/winter months?
drdawg (Ken Ramsey) - Tropical Plants & More
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]www.tropicalplantsandmore.com[/url]
If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Sep 20, 2015 4:38 PM CST

Moderator

Because of the time of year I'd wait to transplant until early spring when they break dormancy.

PlantsRus
Oct 31, 2015 12:28 AM CST
Hi, I'm new to the site and to Plumerias. Last year I received a Plumeria plant as a gift but no blooms yet. It looked so healthy with big leaves but today half of the leaves just dropped off. Thanks to you guys I found it's just going dormant. How old does a plant have to be before it blooms? I'm anxious to see what the blooms will look like. Thanks.
Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
Plumerias Photo Contest Winner: 2015 Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator Region: Florida Cat Lover Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Tropicals
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Dutchlady1
Oct 31, 2015 3:49 AM CST

Moderator

Welcome! PlantsRus
A plumeria, when grown from a cutting, can bloom the first year. A seedling will take anywhere from 3 years on to start blooming.
Could you add your location/zone to your profile? it helps us to answer questions about your conditions.
Name: Gigi
Florida (Zone 9a)
Plumerias Sempervivums Roses Cactus and Succulents Garden Ideas: Level 1
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GigiPlumeria
Oct 31, 2015 5:29 AM CST
Welcome! PlantsRus, you've come to the right place :).
┬ęby Gigi Plumeria "Gardening is my favorite past time. I grow whatever plant that catches my attention." Plumeria Photos http://www.flickr.com/groups/calachuchi_plumeria_/ plant photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/gigiplumeria/sets/
Name: Ken Ramsey
Starkville, MS (Zone 8a)
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]
Orchids Greenhouse Vegetable Grower Ferns Region: United States of America Hummingbirder
Composter Bromeliad Master Gardener: Mississippi Cat Lover Tropicals Plumerias
Image
drdawg
Oct 31, 2015 8:49 AM CST
Now, Hetty. You need to change the "will" to "might". Whistling You know one of my seedlings formed its flower stalk at 13 mo. and began to bloom at 14 months. At 15 months she was in full bloom with eight flowers at one time. She is still in bloom three months later. Our cool, wet weather over the last couple of weeks has slowed her blooming though. My wife still hasn't named her.

By the way, we have a very good friend who is some sort of expert identifying fragrances. She used to be in the cosmetic industry, creating fragrances from various essences. Anyway, my wife asked if she might drop by and tell us what the fragrance is of not only the seedling's flowers, but also four other varieties that are in bloom now. Everyone who comes to the house is "forced" to smell those seedling flowers and tell me what fragrance it reminds them of. I even make the construction guys do it (but they aren't much help Sticking tongue out ). A lady came over yesterday and said the fragrance reminded her of honey suckle. I never thought of that and she might be right.
drdawg (Ken Ramsey) - Tropical Plants & More
[url=www.tropicalplantsandmore.com]www.tropicalplantsandmore.com[/url]
If God wanted me to touch my toes, he would have put them on my knees.

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