Plant ID forum: Can anyone identify this plant?

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mes
Oct 31, 2015 11:16 AM CST
I recently bought a small tropical houseplant, but I don't know what it is. It has almond-shaped, slightly waxy, dark green leaves that have veins ranging from red to pink and yellow. The plant is about 8 inches wide and tall, and leaves are about 4-6 inches long. Does anyone have any idea what this plant might be? Care tips are also welcome! Thanks Smiling (I have included two photos, but I am afraid the quality is not very good.)
Thumb of 2015-10-31/mes/689bd9

Name: Jay
Nederland, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Region: Gulf Coast Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the first seed swap I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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Horntoad
Oct 31, 2015 12:02 PM CST
Looks like a Croton. I'm not sure what variety.
Maybe this one. Croton (Codiaeum variegatum)
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[Last edited by Horntoad - Oct 31, 2015 12:06 PM (+)]
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Name: Hetty
Sunny Naples, Florida (Zone 10a)
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Dutchlady1
Oct 31, 2015 2:43 PM CST
I agree
Name: Sandi
Austin, Tx (Zone 8b)
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Bubbles
Nov 1, 2015 4:19 PM CST
@mes Try not to over water it if you keep it inside over winter. And Welcome to ATP!

mes
Nov 3, 2015 8:24 AM CST
Thank you! I have read that in general, crotons need to be watered only when the top of the soil in the pot is dry... Is this true of all varieties?
Name: Sandi
Austin, Tx (Zone 8b)
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Bubbles
Nov 3, 2015 5:15 PM CST
Well, "scientifically," you should stick your finger into the pot to check for dampness. Whistling Indoors, the top of the soil may dry out a bit, but be really wet under an inch or so. It's easy to overwater in winter. Also, don't be too concerned if your croton drops a few leaves while indoors. Cut back on water if the leaf drop is severe. Don't know what part of the country you're in, but you may want to set the pot outside during the warmer months. It will be happier on the patio.

mes
Nov 4, 2015 8:07 AM CST
Great, thanks for your help! I may put it outside in July and August, but it will be mostly an indoor plant, as I live in Ontario :).

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