Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: Killing my old Euphorbia(?)

Views: 457, Replies: 10 » Jump to the end
Name: Alli O'Cain
Cedar Park ( Austin) Tx (Zone 8b)
Image
aocain
Nov 21, 2015 1:07 PM CST
This poor plant I believe I have starved for water or something.. its turning black and crispy maybe.. I dont like to touch it its milk it stingy and it is pretty fragile anyways just normally. Its either rotting or drying.. not sure what to do. Never repotted.. lots of babies grothes.. and as you can see it hasnt gotten enough direct light.. its gotten thin growths. I ve written about that before. But can you guess whats happening? I can try to get better pics if needed. Its on sveral larger pieces of plant. I dont want it to spread more if its a disease. And if i have to repot ckean up etc.. do I left all the broken pieces healover a few days before i repot? How do little parts root?sorry about the pic being sideways.. not sure why.. open it up so you can see the full top of the plant too.. its he@vy with new growth... what do I do with those since the mamma is obviously dying.


Thumb of 2015-11-21/aocain/15f28f

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are"
Alfred Austin
[Last edited by aocain - Nov 21, 2015 1:10 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #993258 (1)
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener Xeriscape
Image
tarev
Nov 21, 2015 1:50 PM CST
Oh poor mama plant! Sad Sad

If it were my plant I will have to remove Mama from the babies, split them, make sure you are wearing gloves, then sprinkle some cinnamon on the ends of the remaining good ones, just to protect it from the rotting. As for the mama plant, I would separate it from the rest, and since the rotting is coming from the bottom, you can try cutting it up, remove the rotten part and throw it out. Then allow the remaining fresh part to callus and dry, you can also sprinkle some cinnamon at the cut end. Not sure if it has enough energy to heal, but you can try to save it.

Were you growing this outdoors? If it were outdoors and it got cold and rained on, that is what happens. Now if it is indoors and in too much shade and getting more water than needed, it will do the same. It really likes lots of warmth and light. During summer when it is really very warm outdoors it can take the rain to a certain point, provided drainage is very good. But as seasons change got to protect it from cold. If indoors, give it as much sun, a south facing window will be perfect for it.

I have a Euphorbia that has been munched on, exposed to cold and rain and it survived, as long as I was able to let it dry and heal.
Name: Alli O'Cain
Cedar Park ( Austin) Tx (Zone 8b)
Image
aocain
Nov 23, 2015 8:18 PM CST
Ok i have some cut and alot that have what looks to be good roots.. so i repot the ones with roots immediately? And then how long do I let the cuttings dry out before i plant?
Thumb of 2015-11-24/aocain/60ce70

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are"
Alfred Austin
Name: Alli O'Cain
Cedar Park ( Austin) Tx (Zone 8b)
Image
aocain
Nov 23, 2015 8:32 PM CST
Oh Ive checked each rooted ones for rot I think I did a good weeding out. Strangely I thought I drenched it and it was still wet but the soil was pretty dry.. but a few days ago i did drench it and it is cool in my apartment and no direct sun.. Im still trying to figure out the sunlight tging .. it gets indirect light .. and iutside its been rainy and cool. Im in Austin. So I dont do this again.. or with others how often with this plant do i water it? Would it be better to mist it heavily?
"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are"
Alfred Austin
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener Xeriscape
Image
tarev
Nov 23, 2015 9:09 PM CST
Just plant the good remaining ones with roots in a well draining media. Do not water yet. Allow the roots to heal. Do not mist either, they are not tropical plants. They have enough moisture in their stem. Try to position in bright light as much as you can.

As for the cuttings, wait till you actually see the cut off part get a hard callus, sprinkle lightly with cinnamon. Just wait patiently, it may take awhile indoors.

Indoors, got to keep it as dry as you can when it is cold. Outdoors same thing, when temps are cold, even if there is no rain, humidity will be high, bad for the succulents, unless you really have them in a good duration of full sun. But night time will be too cold for them, that is why we try to provide them indoor dry conditions, but they would need to be kept warm, and given good light during the day.

Typically when the cool Fall air comes, they will start to go into winter rest mode. So got to keep them warm and dry.

tamirobert
Nov 28, 2015 9:47 AM CST
Why cinnamon? I've never heard of that before for plants.

Plantomaniac08
Nov 28, 2015 11:37 AM CST
Cinnamon is a natural anti-fungal. nodding
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener Xeriscape
Image
tarev
Nov 28, 2015 11:39 AM CST
Cinnamon has natural anti-fungal properties, and it also repels ants. Just do not apply on the roots directly, it may dry out too much.

Plantomaniac08
Nov 28, 2015 11:49 AM CST
Oo, right! I've read that it repels water, so not to use it on roots, unless you cut one and are trying to seal off the cut. Smiling
Name: Alli O'Cain
Cedar Park ( Austin) Tx (Zone 8b)
Image
aocain
May 14, 2016 3:53 PM CST
Well it does all of it.. So depressed.. Like I said in a previous post recently in this apartment I've killed all my succulents and most of the cacti.. Too cold in the place and not enough sun. But I am moving to a new place that faces east I belief in the balcony, which as here there's no balcony so always indoors or shaded.. And my place is cold and dark.. Just bad all the way around unless you want a nap..lol
Solo here's my question do any of you know exactly what the plant was and where maybe I can find one? I really loved that plant, I've not seen one here in Austin Tx before. The lady I bought it from had brought it from California. Somewhere I have a good and healthy pic of it I will try to find it.. It had obviously started to grow skinny tops due to lack of sun.
Ok found the pic.. Back when it was healthy.
Thumb of 2016-05-14/aocain/9161de

"Show me your garden and I shall tell you what you are"
Alfred Austin
[Last edited by aocain - May 14, 2016 4:02 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1148618 (10)
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier
Image
Baja_Costero
May 15, 2016 7:33 PM CST
The plant looks like maybe E. anoplia or a hybrid... a bunch of similar looking Euphorbias like that. The main thing at this point (as tarev emphasized along with some other good advice) is lots of light.

For years I have grown a group of plants like that (E. polygona and anoplia) on my SW-facing balcony, in day-long sun, in clay pots that dry out completely within days. In my experience they cannot get too much sun. Now we do have a very mild climate here so things may be different if you have to factor in heat. But these are rock-solid, bulletproof plants in strong light, resistant to bugs and growing with the right kind of shape (compact). There is always going to be some degree of browning of the stem (corking or whatever you want to call it) over time with long-lived Euphorbias. Nobody likes it but it's part of the aging process.

In any case strong light will make a big difference in the general health of your plant. Indoors that means hours of daily sun. Strong light will also promote the drying out of the the soil. Your watering schedule should be based around watering well and then waiting until the soil is dry (or almost dry) at depth before watering again.

If you are going to be moving the plant(s) around to take advantage of exposure, which I do regularly, just remember that big, abrupt changes in exposure are always going to be more difficult for plants to tolerate than smaller, more gradual adjustments. In other words if you want to ramp up the light, do it stepwise over a few weeks so the plant has time to adjust.

All the baby plants you managed to pull out of there look like they are in great shape to carry on.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - May 15, 2016 7:35 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1149990 (11)

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Cactus and Tender Succulents forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by Baja_Costero and is called "Agave"