Vegetables and Fruit forum: Celery and/or Patio Pumpkins

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Name: Kayleigh
(Zone 5a)
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Irises Daylilies Cut Flowers Butterflies Region: Indiana Vegetable Grower
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HoosierHarvester
Nov 24, 2015 2:02 PM CST
Well, I have a couple questions. I spend most of my time reading and researching and growing flowering type plants. Although I vegetable garden, I don't check out vegetable varieties as much, or very little.

So, does anyone here grow celery in say growing zone 6, 5 or 4? Can you give me any tips. I saw that starting seeds early indoors is best and it prefers lots of moisture, full sun and cool temps. Are there lots of seed varieties, or any ones recommended better than others? I would like to try growing some once or twice, just for. Can celery be grown in large containers?

Second question is regarding pumpkins. I've been doing a lot of canning lately and have thoroughly enjoyed it (although I've always canned tomatoes and salsa and some times green beans). I know that pumpkins are lots larger than tomatoes, but are there any patio variety types offered? Or even varieties that have shorter vines. I need a good eating type, which I've seen are usually the smaller ones. My hopes would be to can only one batch, or 7 pints. [I don't need any more than 7 pumpkin pies a year. Big Grin )

Thanks.
Name: Arturo Tarak
Bariloche, Rio Negro, Argentin
hampartsum
Nov 24, 2015 5:14 PM CST
Hello Kayleigh, I assume that our growing zone lies somewhere near your 5 to 7, simply we are way south in the southern hemisphere, where we grow organic vegetables as a small buisiness. We grow Waltham Butternut squashes and they last until next spring without the need of canning. They can grow in a container and can be trained onto a cane or some other vertical support ( ours is just plastic packaging string that hangs from above inside our greenhouse). Once the squashes are ripe in mid fall you let them dry in the sun and keep them in a dry sunny spot and they will last until the following spring. Each vine will produce one or two squashes. I reckon than Butternut squashes are not large pumpkins but they fill up a pretty good pumpkin pie for us anyway and their size is just about what a family of 4 would need for a meal. Winter Squashes and pumpkins are different species yet from a culinary point of view they seem almost interchangeable. We tried growing pumpkins the same way but they clearly want to run close to the ground and they take up too much space in our greenhouses. So perhaps when we manage to build our greenhouses to protect our fruit trees I hope to try some of the larger pumpkins.
By the way it's spring here south, and our celery has emerged. You surface sow the seed and keep it almost wet for about two to three (!) weeks... they are slow germinators on a sunny window sill or in a cool greenhouse ( they need light for germination). The seed is very tiny so sow scantily otherwise you will have enough celery seedlings to offer all your friends and neighbors. As for variety we grow tall Green Utah, that grows into a sizable plant by fall, you can harvest the outer stalks before chopping or pulling the full plant. If you have a greenhouse you can grow a few there and keep harvesting until the following spring when the plant will bolt and flower.
By the way has anybody tried celeriac? We have a tray full of seedlings and would love to learn how to cultivate them. I would also appreciate any culinary suggestions. Thank you. Arturo
Name: Kayleigh
(Zone 5a)
Cat Lover Seed Starter Canning and food preservation Plays in the sandbox Lilies Hummingbirder
Irises Daylilies Cut Flowers Butterflies Region: Indiana Vegetable Grower
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HoosierHarvester
Nov 24, 2015 6:07 PM CST
Thank you, Arturo, for posting. I've actually grown Waltham butternut squash in past. Truth is, I cooked them for someone else by halfing them, and then baking them in the oven and just putting butter in the hole. I'm not fond of them. But I've never tried them in a pumpkin pie type fashion. I know people do sweet potatoes that way. But I don't particularly like sweet potatoes either. I have grown sweet potatoes too, and find them easy to grow, and fun - - I just don't like their texture in my mouth. Sad If it has that same texture, I know I wouldn't like it. Pumpkin pie is smooth. And I'll keep in my a possible way to grow the squash for just a few to try.

And thanks for the info on the celery.

Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
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tveguy3
Nov 25, 2015 7:09 PM CST
Last year I planted a pumpkin that was supposed to be a bush type. I got it from Jung Seeds. The vines ended up being about 10 feet, which is much shorter then most of the regular pumpkins, but still took up a quite a bit more space. Although I didn't can any of them, just gave them to kids for Halloween carving, in the past when I've canned pumpkin for pies I've added the sugar and all of the seasonings and canned it. Then all I had to do was add milk and eggs and pour it into the pie shell. Smiling Mostly I just use squash for pies, and I can't taste any difference between that and pumpkin.
I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion. - Alexander the Great
Name: Kayleigh
(Zone 5a)
Cat Lover Seed Starter Canning and food preservation Plays in the sandbox Lilies Hummingbirder
Irises Daylilies Cut Flowers Butterflies Region: Indiana Vegetable Grower
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HoosierHarvester
Nov 25, 2015 7:14 PM CST
Thanks @tveguy3 for posting. That sounds like the way I'd like to can it. Libby's offers both commercially. My mom and I were just talking about how we prefer the Libby's with seasoning already in it, though we add some additional. So someone else indicated they used squash as well. Do you use the butternut type squash too? I've never grown pumpkins, but I know I can grow butternut squash. Perhaps for future purposes, you can offer a recipe of sorts. How much of this and how much of that?
Name: Dillard Haley
Augusta Georgia (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Master Level Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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farmerdill
Nov 25, 2015 8:35 PM CST
Libby's canned pumpkin is actually a C. moschata squash (Dickinson). There are quite a few bush type winter squash. Gold Nugget is a small Hubbard type (C. maxima) Burpees Butterbush is a small butternut (C. moschata) and there are a number of C. pepo types (mostly acorns and delicatas) The Cheyenne Bush Pumpkin actually has a short 6 foot vine But is compact with 6- 10 lb orange traditional pumpkins (C. pepo). It is a 1943 release- a cross between New England Pie and Cocozelle. Bushkin is a newer variety but similar in size and plant growth. Supposed to have better flavor than Cheyenne, but I have not grown it.
Don't grow celery so can't help with that.
Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
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tveguy3
Nov 26, 2015 4:48 AM CST
I have made pies from Hubbard, Turks Turban (which is really a gourd I'm told) Butternut, Butter cup, and today I'm using Sweet Meat. I have not noticed any difference in flavor in a pie. I think you can use any type you want and should have good results.

As far as a pie recipe, I use my mothers, but pumpkin pie seems to be one of those things that everyone has their favorite way to season it. You will have to make a few and adjust the spice to your liking. Smiling

Pumpkin Pie

2 cups pumpkin
1/2 cup white sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 T dark molasses
4 eggs
Pinch of salt
2 teasp. Cinnamon
1/2 teasp. ground Cloves
1/4 teasp. ginger
1/4 teasp. nutmeg (fresh grated is best)
1 cup of condensed milk.

I just put everything in the food processor and blend it until it's nicely mixed, and pour it into an unbaked pie shell and bake for about 50 minutes at 350 degrees, or until a knife inserted into the middle comes out clean.

If you are planning on canning it, leave out the eggs and milk.

If after you make one, if you don't like a certain spice, either eliminate it next time, or reduce the amount. Play with it until you get what you like.
I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion. - Alexander the Great
Name: Kayleigh
(Zone 5a)
Cat Lover Seed Starter Canning and food preservation Plays in the sandbox Lilies Hummingbirder
Irises Daylilies Cut Flowers Butterflies Region: Indiana Vegetable Grower
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HoosierHarvester
Nov 26, 2015 4:33 PM CST
Thank You! @farmerdill and @tveguy3 ! There is a thread some place about "are you preparing for 2016". I guess if i found it, I would respond yes, I think I'm going to grow squash. That is very interesting about the Libby's product. Sounds odd that they would call it pumpkin. In fact my mom and I were discussing today where would may have to call it squash pie. Smiling But then we do actually have a zucchini squash pie recipe which tastes a lot like sugar creme pie.
[Last edited by HoosierHarvester - Nov 26, 2015 4:34 PM (+)]
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Name: Dillard Haley
Augusta Georgia (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Master Level Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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farmerdill
Nov 26, 2015 5:23 PM CST
Pumpkins are winter squash, mostly the term is associated with shape. Dickenson is pumpkin shaped just tan instead of orange. Exception being the Cushaws which are also usually called pumpkins but are bell or crookneck shaped.
Name: Kayleigh
(Zone 5a)
Cat Lover Seed Starter Canning and food preservation Plays in the sandbox Lilies Hummingbirder
Irises Daylilies Cut Flowers Butterflies Region: Indiana Vegetable Grower
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HoosierHarvester
Nov 26, 2015 5:46 PM CST
Thanks again @farmerdill . I always knew I loved *pumpkins*, I just didn't know there were so many types.

I may change my direction the first year, and try Dickinson pumpkins and just plant two or three plants. I see that they are Heirloom which is an exceptional plus. Two vines would probably be sufficient, but would that be good enough for pollination, or are they self-fertile? Being 40 pounds is much larger than I want, but I suppose it wouldn't hurt to start big and scale down.

Anyone have any Dickinson pumpkin seeds they'd share for postage, or perhaps a trade?
Name: Kayleigh
(Zone 5a)
Cat Lover Seed Starter Canning and food preservation Plays in the sandbox Lilies Hummingbirder
Irises Daylilies Cut Flowers Butterflies Region: Indiana Vegetable Grower
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HoosierHarvester
Nov 26, 2015 5:50 PM CST
I read wrong at BakerCreek Heirloom. They *can be up to* 40 pounds. If I got three or four 20- pounders, out of two vines, I'd be quite happy.

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